Exploration and the power of nature for cognitive growth

Cdb758075f7b54ea4ef646898497ecf3?s=47 cjlortie
April 21, 2019
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Exploration and the power of nature for cognitive growth

Positive psychology and numerous other disciplines of research have examined the capacity for nature to enhance cognitive growth and promote higher levels of mental well being. This is a brief deck summarizing the research to date and was inspired by the work of Richard Louv.

YouTube chat for a brief explanation of deck: https://youtu.be/MTMDvIkh3Dg

Resources
Louv R (2016) Vitamin N. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: Algonquin Books.
Louv R (2008) Last child in the woods. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: Algonquin Books.
Sarathy V (2018) Real World Problem-Solving. Frontiers in human neuroscience 12: 261-261.
McMahan EA and Estes D (2015) The effect of contact with natural environments on positive and negative affect: A meta-analysis. The Journal of Positive Psychology 10: 507-519.
Berman MG, Jonides J and Kaplan S (2008) The Cognitive Benefits of Interacting With Nature. Psychological Science 19: 1207-1212.
Kuo M, Barnes M and Jordan C (2019) Do Experiences With Nature Promote Learning? Converging Evidence of a Cause-and-Effect Relationship. Frontiers in Psychology 10: 305.
Miles JNV, Parast L, Babey SH, Griffin BA and Saunders JM (2017) A Propensity-Score-Weighted Population-Based Study of the Health Benefits of Dogs and Cats for Children. Anthrozoös 30: 429-440.
Brussoni M, Gibbons R, Gray C, Ishikawa T, Sandseter BE, et al. (2015) What is the Relationship between Risky Outdoor Play and Health in Children? A Systematic Review. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 12.
Becker C, Lauterbach G, Spengler S, Dettweiler U and Mess F (2017) Effects of Regular Classes in Outdoor Education Settings: A Systematic Review on Students’ Learning, Social and Health Dimensions. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 14.
Xiong S, Sankaridurg P, Naduvilath T, Zang J, Zou H, et al. (2017) Time spent in outdoor activities in relation to myopia prevention and control: a meta-analysis and systematic review. Acta Ophthalmologica 95: 551-566.
Gascon M, Zijlema W, Vert C, White MP and Nieuwenhuijsen MJ (2017) Outdoor blue spaces, human health and well-being: A systematic review of quantitative studies. International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health 220: 1207-1221.
Xiong S, Sankaridurg P, Naduvilath T, Zang J, Zou H, et al. (2017) Time spent in outdoor activities in relation to myopia prevention and control: a meta-analysis and systematic review. Acta Ophthalmologica 95: 551-566.
Capaldi CA, Dopko RL and Zelenski JM (2014) The relationship between nature connectedness and happiness: a meta-analysis. Frontiers in Psychology 5: 976.
Plambech T and Konijnendijk van den Bosch CC (2015) The impact of nature on creativity – A study among Danish creative professionals. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening 14: 255-263.
Howell AJ, Dopko RL, Passmore H-A and Buro K (2011) Nature connectedness: Associations with well-being and mindfulness. Personality and Individual Differences 51: 166-171.
Studente S, Seppala N and Sadowska N (2016) Facilitating creative thinking in the classroom: Investigating the effects of plants and the colour green on visual and verbal creativity. Thinking Skills and Creativity 19: 1-8.
Leong LYC, Fischer R and McClure J (2014) Are nature lovers more innovative? The relationship between connectedness with nature and cognitive styles. Journal of Environmental Psychology 40: 57-63.
Leong LYC, Fischer R and McClure J (2014) Are nature lovers more innovative? The relationship between connectedness with nature and cognitive styles. Journal of Environmental Psychology 40: 57-63.
Schutte NS and Malouff JM (2018) Mindfulness and connectedness to nature: A meta-analytic investigation. Personality and Individual Differences 127: 10-14.
Balundė A, Jovarauskaitė L and Poškus MS (2019) Exploring the Relationship Between Connectedness With Nature, Environmental Identity, and Environmental Self-Identity: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. SAGE Open 9: 2158244019841925.
Williams KJH, Lee KE, Hartig T, Sargent LD, Williams NSG, et al. (2018) Conceptualising creativity benefits of nature experience: Attention restoration and mind wandering as complementary processes. Journal of Environmental Psychology 59: 36-45.

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cjlortie

April 21, 2019
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Transcript

  1. vitamin N & cognitive growth @cjlortie

  2. debate about (N)atural

  3. None
  4. None
  5. None
  6. None
  7. None
  8. less native, somewhat natural

  9. different species & different complexity

  10. 11 million bits of information per second in cities Plambech

    et al. 2015
  11. people are animals too

  12. ecology is always about interactions (with one another, other species,

    and the environment)
  13. the promise of environmental neuroscience Berman et al. 2019

  14. explore this interaction set

  15. as an antidote to this interaction set screen time

  16. ART attention restoration theory Berman et al. 2008 & Bratman

    et al. 2015
  17. BET biophilia effect Kellert & Wilson 1993 evolutionary history &

    connectedness
  18. SRT stress-reduction theory Ulrich et al. 1991

  19. None
  20. cognition

  21. knowledge, processing, experience, perception, learning, reasoning

  22. None
  23. 0, 5, 3, 2, 7

  24. None
  25. 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5

  26. Berman et al. 2008 50 individuals tested all typically showed

    modest increases from a walk outside or imagery
  27. ~250 people test to date show mean change at +20%

    with a short walk (15-50mins) Bratman et al. 2015
  28. stress

  29. McMahan & Estes 2015 2356 people tested 20-40% of variation

    explained by experiencing nature
 (viewing or outside) stress
  30. McMahan & Estes 2015 lab < outside manicured nature =

    wild nature Sweden < Canada < USA < Japan
  31. Capaldi et al. 2014 8523 people happier with nature

  32. creativity

  33. 104 people tested for verbal & visual creativity with &

    without natural views/plants Studente et al. 2016
  34. None
  35. visual creativity (judged by others) increased by nearly 20% but

    not all measures universally increased
  36. problem solving

  37. RWPS real world problem-solving Sarathy 2018

  38. Sarathy 2018

  39. Williams et al. 2018

  40. less-demanding complexity on cognition reductions in top-down attentional control evolutionary

    history & refuge effects autonomic nervous system tuning implications bonus items mitigate onset of short-sightedness increased fertility
  41. how low can you go? vegging out sufficiency

  42. tools get outside develop an environmental identity photos, windows, views

    use active interactions with nature explore whatever natural elements are immediately present walk and walking meetings change your ‘learning’ environment challenge or risk or play outside
  43. 25,782 participants benefitted from risky outdoor play Brussoni et al.

    2015
  44. None
  45. None
  46. take the green pill

  47. side effects

  48. additional info