Web Design | Tech Talk

1fdb10955c973b8925d5c1430d1b3abe?s=47 FVCproductions
August 05, 2015

Web Design | Tech Talk

We explore simplicity.

Tech Talk presented at Fullstack Academy on August 5th.

FVCproductions

1fdb10955c973b8925d5c1430d1b3abe?s=128

FVCproductions

August 05, 2015
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Transcript

  1. Web Design We explore simplicity. FVCproductions

  2. Overview Why should I care? What is it anyways? Up

    and Coming Good Practices Bad Practices No, seriously — why should you care?
  3. Overview Why should I care? What is it anyways? Up

    and Coming Good Practices Bad Practices No, seriously — why should you care?
  4. GITHUB REPO WITH THE MOST ̣s???

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  8. Overview Why should I care? What is it anyways? Up

    and Coming Good Practices Bad Practices No, seriously — why should you care?
  9. Generally speaking…

  10. User Interface UI UX User Experience

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  12. Repeat Uses Complex Interactions Task Completion Designing Software vs Designing

    Websites
  13. Overview Why should I care? What is it anyways? Up

    and Coming Good Practices Bad Practices No, seriously — why should you care?
  14. Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook, and the Google. They all love their

    cards. Cards Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook and the Google. They all love their cards. Cards terest, Twitter, Facebook, d the Google. Cards terest, Twitter, Facebook, d the Google. all love their cards. Cards Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook and the Google. Cards
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  18. Overview Why should I care? What is it anyways? Up

    and Coming Good Practices Bad Practices No, seriously — why should you care?
  19. GOOD UX GOOD UI

  20. Header 1 Header 2 Header 3 Body Quote Style Guide

  21. Break It Down

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  23. Planning

  24. Overview Why should I care? What is it anyways? Up

    and Coming Good Practices Bad Practices No, seriously — why should you care?
  25. consider yourself creative, but think of what you’re capable of

    producing: beautiful websites, complex gaming worlds, smartphone apps-- the list is seemingly endless. Here’s a good analogy: Think of code like music. Both require knowledge of a specific language: Java for coders and musical notes for musicians. Creativity comes into play when that knowledge is applied -- when you’re able to string together notes or pieces of code to create something complex, intriguing and beautiful, like Beethoven’s 5th Symphony… or Grand Theft Auto V. In that same vein, approaching creativity through coding may help you relate to the designers that you work with. • (3) Send hiring managers a message. Even if employers are not specifically seeking a coder who understands the design process, the fact that you can speak the language tells them that you’re versatile and willing to learn new things. • (4) Be an invaluable liaison. Knowing how to code and understanding the design process puts you in the unique position of translating between two languages – design-speak and code-talk. If you’ve ever worked with designers, sometimes the jargon they use makes absolutely no sense to you. Knowing a bit of their lingo can also help fill the gap. • (5) Contribute to the design process. When you understand a thing or two about design, you can provide valuable feedback to the designer, particularly from a coder’s perspective. • (6) Feel the designer’s pain. Despite your sincerest efforts, you’ve come to realize that design just isn’t your thing. But having gone
  26. consider yourself creative, but think of what you’re capable of

    producing: beautiful websites, complex gaming worlds, smartphone apps-- the list is seemingly endless. Here’s a good analogy: Think of code like music. Both require knowledge of a specific language: Java for coders and musical notes for musicians. Creativity comes into play when that knowledge is applied -- when you’re able to string together notes or pieces of code to create something complex, intriguing and beautiful, like Beethoven’s 5th Symphony… or Grand Theft Auto V. In that same vein, approaching creativity through coding may help you relate to the designers that you work with. • (3) Send hiring managers a message. Even if employers are not specifically seeking a coder who understands the design process, the fact that you can speak the language tells them that you’re versatile and willing to learn new things. • (4) Be an invaluable liaison. Knowing how to code and understanding the design process puts you in the unique position of translating between two languages – design-speak and code-talk. If you’ve ever worked with designers, sometimes the jargon they use makes absolutely no sense to you. Knowing a bit of their lingo can also help fill the gap. • (5) Contribute to the design process. When you understand a thing or two about design, you can provide valuable feedback to the designer, particularly from a coder’s perspective. • (6) Feel the designer’s pain. Despite your sincerest efforts, you’ve come to realize that design just isn’t your thing. But having gone
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  28. Big Changes

  29. Big Changes

  30. BAD UX BAD UI

  31. BAD UX GOOD UI

  32. Overview Why should I care? What is it anyways? Up

    and Coming Good Practices Bad Practices No, seriously — why should you care?
  33. “The other overlooked aspect of winning a hackathon is design.”

    - M R . YA N G
  34. “Most contestants don’t go past the default designs—how many times

    have we all seen that default black navbar from the Twitter’s Bootstrap CSS Framework in hackathon presentations? If you do this, you’re leaving a huge amount of points on the table.” M R . YA N G
  35. If all else fails… Avoid Unnecessary Work

  36. Design Resources

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  38. References

  39. Thanks. We just explored simplicity. FVCproductions