Design Thinking for Client Engagement

A605a94f062c006921a31b945cbc44d6?s=47 Megan Erin Miller
September 04, 2013

Design Thinking for Client Engagement

Presented through CASCADE SF at Runway SF on September 4, 2013.

"Design thinking is a human-centered approach to innovation that draws from the designer's toolkit to integrate the needs of people, the possibilities of technology, and the requirements for business success."
—Tim Brown, president and CEO of IDEO

In this talk, we will explore how to apply a design thinking mindset to your discovery and design process. You will walk away with new strategies for:

* Building client trust
* Facilitating client communication and collaboration
* Establishing a common design language
* Reducing time and controlling scope
* Guiding clients to solutions you know will work

We will look at how using physical tools and time-bound workshops can encourage client creativity and engagement, and how setting a tone of openness, compassion, and play can transform your client’s experience in your next project. You'll walk away with a deeper understanding of the design thinking mindset, and tips and tricks for crafting your own arsenal of physical artifacts to aid you in your design process.

Video of this talk available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tPXgFBzLRs

A605a94f062c006921a31b945cbc44d6?s=128

Megan Erin Miller

September 04, 2013
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Transcript

  1. Design Thinking for Client Engagement SEPTEMBER 4, 2013 • CASCADE

    SF Megan Erin Miller @meganerinmiller
  2. Design thinking is a human-centered approach to innovation that draws

    from the designer’s toolkit to integrate the needs of people, the possibilities of technology, and the requirements for business success. Tim Brown, President and CEO of IDEO “ ”
  3. LET’S INNOVATE

  4. Traditional design process discovery   wireframes   design   comps

     
  5. Artifacts of design process User Personas Task Flows Site Maps

    Wireframes Style Tiles Design Comps
  6. Clients don’t understand wireframes

  7. None
  8. Lost in translation Clients don’t speak “designer” Our artifacts are

    not self-apparent
  9. What we’re really a"er Their priorities Their goals Their aesthetic

    preferences Editorial direction Decision making
  10. It’s a problem of communication We are balancing technical and

    design considerations They don’t know how to give us the information we need
  11. There’s a better way Apply design thinking to the way

    we work with our clients
  12. Design thinking is a human-centered approach to innovation that draws

    from the designer’s toolkit to integrate the needs of people, the possibilities of technology, and the requirements for business success. Tim Brown, President and CEO of IDEO “ ”
  13. “ ” Design thinking is a human-centered approach to innovation

    that draws from the designer’s toolkit to integrate the needs of people, the possibilities of technology, and the requirements for business success. Tim Brown, President and CEO of IDEO
  14. “ ” Design thinking is a human-centered approach to innovation

    that draws from the designer’s toolkit to integrate the needs of people, the possibilities of technology, and the requirements for business success. Tim Brown, President and CEO of IDEO
  15. “ ” Design thinking is a human-centered approach to innovation

    that draws from the designer’s toolkit to integrate the needs of people, the possibilities of technology, and the requirements for business success. Tim Brown, President and CEO of IDEO
  16. “ ” Design thinking is a human-centered approach to innovation

    that draws from the designer’s toolkit to integrate the needs of people, the possibilities of technology, and the requirements for business success. Tim Brown, President and CEO of IDEO
  17. Design thinking is a human-centered approach to innovation that draws

    from the designer’s toolkit to integrate the needs of people, the possibilities of technology, and the requirements for business success. Tim Brown, President and CEO of IDEO “ ”
  18. Design an experience for our clients

  19. Our goals go beyond design Build trust Establish common language

    Collaborate Inspire ownership Reduce time, control scope
  20. Create a structure for conversation

  21. Create an environment for play Photo  from  h5p://flickr.com/photos/stria;c/470233447/  

  22. LET’S PLAY

  23. Why do we want to play? Build trust Establish common

    language Collaborate Inspire ownership Reduce time, control scope
  24. Structured limitations Photo  from  h5p://flickr.com/photos/19565307@N00/86557617/  

  25. Game mechanics: “Quests”

  26. Celebrate milestones and successes Photo  from  h5p://www.flickr.com/photos/23864499@N00/2621532544/  

  27. Game mechanics: “Progression”

  28. Clear goals and roadmap to success

  29. Game mechanics: “Appointment Dynamics”

  30. Time-bound Workshops and activities Photo  from  h5p://www.flickr.com/photos/43917849@N08/8086959997/  

  31. For each goal, create a tool Photo  from  h5p://www.flickr.com/photos/24183489@N00/132914327  

  32. MAKE IT PHYSICAL

  33. Physical interaction builds fundamental concepts

  34. Fundamental corporeal concepts such as near and far, hard and

    so", jagged and pointed, weak and strong, open and closed, and so on are rooted in animate movement. Dr. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone, Movement as a way of knowing “ ”
  35. We naturally speak the language of the physical Photo  from

     h5p://www.flickr.com/photos/40645538@N00/4269396864/  
  36. Physical artifacts can act as translators

  37. How can we harness the power of physical experiences?

  38. We do this already Sketching Diagrams

  39. Drawing your idea helps you address its structure with a

    different part of your brain, and see it from a new angle. Joe Ringenberg, How Diagrams Solve Problems “ ”
  40. Give them something to react to Photo  from  h5p://flickr.com/photos/7471115@N08/4766284256/  

  41. Facilitate communication and collaboration

  42. Externalizing ideas allows for closer collaboration, earlier input, and deeper

    thought partnership. Stefan Klocek Better together; the practice of successful creative collaboration “ ”
  43. Build trust

  44. Sharing the journey with the client and being transparent is

    key to establishing trust. By involving the client from the early stages they become more invested. Anthony Lui, Live Wireframing “ ”
  45. Just enough space for creativity Photo  from  h5p://www.flickr.com/photos/34016005@N04/3484003209  

  46. Inspire ownership

  47. Guide them to solutions you know will work Photo  from

     h5p://www.games-­‐sun.com/files/file/The-­‐Dinosaur_coloring_by_numbers_pictures_for_kids_girls_boys_children5.jpg  
  48. Photo  from  h5p://www.games-­‐sun.com/files/file/The-­‐Dinosaur_coloring_by_numbers_pictures_for_kids_girls_boys_children5.jpg  

  49. A NEW DESIGN TOOLKIT

  50. Design artifacts User Personas Task Flows Site Maps Wireframes Style

    Tiles Design Comps
  51. What we’re really a"er Their priorities Their goals Their aesthetic

    preferences Editorial direction Decision making
  52. A Tactile Design Kit http://www.TactileDesignKit.com

  53. A Tactile Design Kit Persona template Website design review worksheet

    Site descriptors worksheet Visual vocabulary reference Navigation worksheets Wireframe toolkit Idea cards
  54. A SAMPLE PROCESS

  55. 1. Kickoff meeting Introduce project process roadmap High-level discovery with

    the client Establish governance and roles
  56. None
  57. 2. Define user personas Summarize user research (if available) Create

    user personas Prioritize personas
  58. None
  59. None
  60. None
  61. 2. Determine aesthetic preferences Review example sites Establish shared aesthetic

    vocabulary Narrow in on client’s aesthetic
  62. None
  63. None
  64. None
  65. None
  66. 3. Navigation and layout Define primary and footer navigation Cra"

    three ideas for wireframes
  67. None
  68. None
  69. None
  70. None
  71. None
  72. None
  73. Managing scope creep

  74. None
  75. Get what you need to make: User Personas Task Flows

    Site Maps Wireframes Style Tiles Design Comps
  76. Other workshops you might need to run: Card sorting Client

    interviews and focus groups
  77. RULES FOR GOOD TOOLS

  78. Cra" the right structure to get the right input

  79. None
  80. None
  81. None
  82. None
  83. None
  84. None
  85. Your technology can drive the structure of your tools

  86. None
  87. None
  88. None
  89. None
  90. A layout library

  91. A Drupal features library

  92. None
  93. None
  94. Facilitate discussion through thoughtfully cra"ed tools

  95. “Yes, and…”

  96. None
  97. Sometimes one tool isn’t enough

  98. Complimentary tools nav layout

  99. Give an example

  100. Labeling matters

  101. But don’t over-label

  102. None
  103. Test your assumptions

  104. None
  105. None
  106. Set expectations and mindset

  107. Set a tone of compassion and fun Photo  from  h5p://www.flickr.com/photos/97831130@N00/1066368855

     
  108. Prepare the environment

  109. Set rules for collaboration Photo  from  h5p://www.flickr.com/photos/8411599@N05/8899378827  

  110. Be agile

  111. Iterate, test, get feedback, iterate…

  112. IMAGINE

  113. Photo  from  h5p://flickr.com/photos/19565307@N00/86557617/   Reduce time, control scope

  114. Let your tools work for you

  115. Create a repeatable process

  116. Forge meaningful relationships Photo  from  h5p://www.flickr.com/photos/92694860@N00/4164759025  

  117. Design is about relationships. Josh Brewer, Principal Designer at Twitter

    “ ”
  118. Empathy is the key to success Photo  from  h5p://www.flickr.com/photos/52798669@N00/3277839203  

  119. LINKS & RESOURCES

  120. Gamestorming (website and book) http://www.gogamestorm.com Introduction to Design Studio Methodology

    http://uxmag.com/articles/introduction-to-design- studio-methodology Design is a Job, by Mike Monteiro http://abookapart.com/products/design-is-a-job
  121. Tactile Design Kit http://www.TactileDesignKit.com Slides are online http://www.MeganErinMiller.com Connect with

    me on Twitter @meganerinmiller
  122. Megan Erin Miller @meganerinmiller THANK YOU!