Introduction to Service Design

A605a94f062c006921a31b945cbc44d6?s=47 Megan Erin Miller
February 13, 2018

Introduction to Service Design

At Stanford, we as staff provide many types of "services" to our community, from administrative support to information technology, security, facilities, and much more. Providing quality, consistent services is at the heart of what we do.

Service design is an approach that applies design thinking and human-centered design to services, aiming to create exceptional end-to-end service experiences for our community. Megan Miller will introduce the basics of service design, its core concepts, methods, and principles, sharing how the University IT Service Design team is working to create consistent, quality experiences across the UIT service portfolio.

You will walk away inspired to take a new look at how your organization designs and delivers services to campus!

Presented February 13, 2018 at Turing Auditorium, Stanford University

Watch the recording:
https://uit.stanford.edu/service/techtraining/class/introduction-service-design

A605a94f062c006921a31b945cbc44d6?s=128

Megan Erin Miller

February 13, 2018
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Transcript

  1. 1.

    Introduction to Service Design Megan Erin Miller, Service Design Manager,

    University IT // Stanford Tech Briefing // Feb. 13, 2018
  2. 2.

    W !

  3. 4.

    T … • What is a service? • What is

    design? • What is service design? • Thinking in services • Applying service design • The UIT Service Design team • Going further…
  4. 6.

    A is… … a means of delivering to clients by

    facilitating that clients want to achieve without the of specific and .
  5. 7.

    Services • Hotels • Restaurants • Airports • Taxis •

    Delivery • Dry cleaning • Banking • Hospitals • etc. • Libraries • Government • Police • Fire stations • Parks • Non-profit • Schools • Wellness/Gyms • etc. • Public improvement projects • Community • Infrastructure • Transportation • Healthcare • Bike schemes • Insurance • etc.
  6. 8.

    Example: The value to the customer: • Food I can’t

    cook myself • Quality time with family & friends • A memorable “outing” • “Don’t have to think about dinner tonight” Costs & Risks owned by the service: • Planning menus • Sourcing ingredients • Managing kitchen budget • Mastery of cooking • Preparation of food • Cleaning up
  7. 9.

    Example: The value to the customer: • Convenient access to

    bikes as means of transportation • Healthy, fast, affordable way to get around town Costs & Risks owned by the service: • Bike ownership • Bike maintenance • Payment mechanisms • Potential loss of bikes • Procuring of bike parking spots
  8. 10.

    Example: The value to the student: • Access to world-class

    learning resources (faculty, libraries, classes, facilities) • Structure provided to facilitate learning • Degree granted with authority that certified student accomplishment • Access to reputational benefits Costs & Risks owned by Stanford: • Accreditation • Operations management • Technology support • Facilities upkeep • Salaries for employees • Compliance • etc.
  9. 11.

    S differ from , in that they… • Span a

    “lifecycle” of interaction • Form a relationship over time • “Provide and perform” • Made of people, processes, places, props, and partners (5 P’s)
  10. 23.
  11. 27.

    Two

  12. 29.

    Designing for • Client benefit: seamless, quality, consistent service experiences

    • Organizational benefit: efficiency, integration, automation, process improvement, and also making employee’s lives better!
  13. 30.

    E

  14. 32.

    Libraries as a B Serving: Students, faculty Touchpoints: Searchworks, checkout,

    computer station, stacks Value: Access to hard-to-find content Costs/Risks: Acquisition, systems maintenance, cataloging, archiving
  15. 34.

    Events as a R H Serving: Alumni Touchpoints: Paper invite,

    registration, class tent, schedule Value: Memories, networking Costs/Risks: Liability, food services, waste disposal, event production
  16. 36.

    Research Administration as a Q f Serving: Faculty PI’s Touchpoints:

    QCAP system, email Value: Assures compliance, accurate accounting Costs/Risks: System maintenance, audit compliance, staff assistance
  17. 38.

    Security as a T -f Serving: All SUNet users Touchpoints:

    Weblogin, DUO, SMS Value: Verifies your identity, easy Costs/Risks: Identity management, secure integrations with SU systems
  18. 40.

    Talent management as a M A Serving: Staff managers Touchpoints:

    Calendar invites, workbook, printed certification Value: Time for professional development, learning, networking Costs/Risks: Content, food, space
  19. 42.

    Infrastructur e as a D Serving: Departments, labs Touchpoints: Email,

    data center, remote server Value: Secure, reliable storage Costs/Risks: Cooling, backup power, maintenance, networking
  20. 44.

    Your T ... Who do you serve? What are your

    touchpoints? What value are you providing? What costs and risks do you take on to deliver your service? What is the experience?
  21. 45.
  22. 46.
  23. 49.

    H - design is… About , their pain points and

    needs, and creating solutions tailored to meet those needs. Human Centered
  24. 51.

    Principles of • Involve the user perspective in all phases

    • Define the problem based on data from users • Generate lots of potential solutions • Test solutions with real people using prototypes • Be iterative
  25. 52.
  26. 55.
  27. 63.

    A different kind of “ ” Not just designing touchpoints,

    but partnering to design sustainable service delivery that enables great experiences: • Processes • Systems • Policies • Support models • Business models • Roles • Metrics • Communications • Branding • and more…
  28. 64.

    As a … • Conduct user research to inform service

    strategy and identify service improvements • Design new or improved, end-to-end service experiences • Design touchpoints for those experiences • Test and iterate on designs • Partner to design service delivery to support user experiences
  29. 67.

    Service design Co-creative Do it with others Cross-functional Involve end-users

    Holistic Equal importance on end-user experience and backstage process Value-oriented Align backstage process to deliver frontstage value to end-user Human-validated Validate assumptions Test with real people Data-based decisions 1 2 3 4
  30. 69.

    Service design 1. Understand current state 2. Frame the problem

    3. Imagine future state 4. Prototype and test 5. Partner to implement 6. Measure and assess
  31. 70.

    Service design 1. Understand current state 2. Frame the problem

    3. Imagine future state 4. Prototype and test 5. Partner to implement 6. Measure and assess M : • User research (interviewing, participatory, surveys, etc.) • Analytics • Service Safari • Current-state Journey Mapping • Current-state Service Blueprinting
  32. 71.

    Service design 1. Understand current state 2. Frame the problem

    3. Imagine future state 4. Prototype and test 5. Partner to implement 6. Measure and assess M : • Five Why’s / Abstract Laddering • Problem Statements • Problem Tree Analysis • Jobs To Be Done
  33. 72.

    Service design 1. Understand current state 2. Frame the problem

    3. Imagine future state 4. Prototype and test 5. Partner to implement 6. Measure and assess M : • “How Might We…” statements • Ideation • Storyboarding • Future-state Journey Mapping • Future-state Service Blueprinting
  34. 73.

    Service design 1. Understand current state 2. Frame the problem

    3. Imagine future state 4. Prototype and test 5. Partner to implement 6. Measure and assess M : • Low-fidelity prototyping • Service Simulation • Desktop Walkthrough • User Testing (applies to all)
  35. 74.

    Service design 1. Understand current state 2. Frame the problem

    3. Imagine future state 4. Prototype and test 5. Partner to implement 6. Measure and assess M : • Touchpoint design • Process design • Usability QA during development
  36. 75.

    Service design 1. Understand current state 2. Frame the problem

    3. Imagine future state 4. Prototype and test 5. Partner to implement 6. Measure and assess M : • Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) • NPS rating • Satisfaction surveys • Usability Testing • Service Assessment
  37. 76.

    Service design 1. Understand current state 2. Frame the problem

    3. Imagine future state 4. Prototype and test 5. Partner to implement 6. Measure and assess An process…
  38. 86.
  39. 89.

    Libraries as a B Serving: Students, faculty Touchpoints: Searchworks, checkout,

    computer station, stacks Value: Access to hard-to-find content Costs/Risks: Acquisition, systems maintenance, cataloging, archiving
  40. 90.

    Service design 1. Understand current state 2. Frame the problem

    3. Imagine future state 4. Prototype and test 5. Partner to implement 6. Measure and assess
  41. 92.
  42. 94.

    4. Come up with Brainstorm ideas for solutions with a

    cross-functional team, and end users (ideation, storyboarding)
  43. 95.

    5. Prototype and test the Design a low-fidelity prototype of

    an improved experience to test with students (paper prototype, service simulation, desktop walkthrough)
  44. 97.

    7. Measure your Put in place metrics to measure success

    of new service experience (KPIs, NPS, analytics)
  45. 98.

    Service design 1. Understand current state 2. Frame the problem

    3. Imagine future state 4. Prototype and test 5. Partner to implement 6. Measure and assess
  46. 101.

    University IT S D team O M Design and facilitate

    quality service experiences across the entire University IT service portfolio, and build design capability across the organization.
  47. 102.

    University IT S D team T • Began fall 2015,

    formed team in fall 2016 • 2 Service Designers, 1 Sr. User Experience Designer, + me • Sit in Service Management Office, Shared Services, UIT • Serve all of University IT
  48. 103.

    University IT S D team W • Client insights •

    Design concepts • Concept validation • Implementation partnership • Training and facilitation
  49. 104.

    University IT S D team W • Client insights •

    Design concepts • Concept validation • Implementation partnership • Training and facilitation
  50. 105.

    University IT S D team W • Client insights •

    Design concepts • Concept validation • Implementation partnership • Training and facilitation
  51. 106.

    University IT S D team W • Client insights •

    Design concepts • Concept validation • Implementation partnership • Training and facilitation
  52. 107.

    University IT S D team W • Client insights •

    Design concepts • Concept validation • Implementation partnership • Training and facilitation
  53. 108.

    University IT S D team W • Client insights •

    Design concepts • Concept validation • Implementation partnership • Training and facilitation
  54. 109.
  55. 111.

    Campus IT Plan User Research Goals: Learn about the IT

    experience and needs of students, faculty, staff to inform campus-wide planning What: • Participatory research workshops with staff • 1:1 interviews w/ faculty, grad/postdocs, and undergrads
  56. 113.

    Client Certificates Goals: Design end-to-end user experience for new Client

    Certificate What: • Identify use cases • Service blueprinting • Touchpoint mapping • Usability QA • User testing
  57. 115.

    Video- conferencing panel design Goals: Redesign Cisco panels to improve

    scheduling and room AV experience with videoconferencing What: • User experience survey • Rapid prototyping and testing • UI design and iteration • User testing • Implementation partnership
  58. 117.

    ServiceNow Services Portal Goals: Design user-friendly Services Portal for ServiceNow

    What: • Information architecture • Wireframes/UX design • Rapid prototyping • User testing • Taxonomy testing • Implementation partnership
  59. 119.

    Zoom selection Goals: User testing to inform tool selection as

    Bluejeans replacement What: • Functional evaluation of tools • User experience survey • Field testing, diary studies • Lab testing for 3 tools • Analysis and recommendation
  60. 121.

    “IT of the Future” in support of workforce mobility Goals:

    Understand barriers to becoming a more remote workforce, and identify IT support needs What: • 1:1 interviews • Interactive workshop to imagine future needs
  61. 123.

    Quality Service Training for Operator Services Center Goals: Assist OSC

    team in identifying quality service principles and refining operational best practices What: • Hands-on, small group interactive workshops
  62. 125.

    Cloud Collaboration & Storage User Research Goals: Inform decision on

    primary and secondary tools, identify service improvement opportunities (Box, Drive, OneDrive) What: • 1:1 contextual interviews
  63. 127.

    The for UIT… D • Defined quality standards • Shared

    service principles • Standard design process • Usability assessment metrics
  64. 129.

    Service design Stanford Service Design Community of Practice https://cop.stanford.edu/community/service-designers Global

    Service Design Community of Practice http://www.practicalservicedesign.com/community Introductory reading http://www.practicalservicedesign.com/service-design-101
  65. 130.

    Join the ! Stanford Service Design Community of Practice Reading

    club, every 3rd Wednesday at lunchtime First meeting: → March 21st – 12:00-1:15pm, Polya 170B or Zoom Join the mailing list by emailing service-designers-owner@lists.stanford.edu