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Greek Pottery

3700411ae81a5ba151f9946dcb59c386?s=47 nichsara
February 26, 2013
70

Greek Pottery

3700411ae81a5ba151f9946dcb59c386?s=128

nichsara

February 26, 2013
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  1. Introduc)on  of  Greek  Po0ery   Reading:   Stokstad,  117-­‐119,  127-­‐128,

      141-­‐142.     Range:   600-­‐31  BCE   Archaic,  Classical,  Hellenis7c     Terms/Concepts:   black  figure,  red  figure,  white   ground,  kiln,  slip,  oxidiza)on,   reduc)on,  reoxidiza)on,  pinax,  slip,   kylix,  amphora,  lekythos,  alabastron,   krater,  symposium,  liba)ons,   Panathenaic  fes)val,  ko0abos,   hetaira,     Monument  List:     Pg.  119,  Euphronios  (painter)   and  Euxitheos  (po0er),   Euphronios  Krater,  Archaic,  c.   515  BCE.     5-­‐1,  Exekias,  Achilles  and  Ajax   Playing  a  Game,  Black-­‐Figure   Amphora,  Archaic,  540-­‐530  BCE.     5-­‐58,  Priam  Painter,  Women  at   Fountain  House,  Greek,  AXc,   Black-­‐Figure,  ca.  520-­‐510  BCE     Not  in  Book,  Niobid  Painter,   Niobid  Krater,  Early  Classical,   475-­‐450  BCE  
  2. Why  Study  Greek  Vases?   1.  Greek  po0ery  depicts  many

     scenes  from   everyday  life  that  o]en  go  unrecorded.   2.  It  expands  our  understanding  of  pain)ngs  on   a  larger  scale.   3.  It  extensively  explores  mythology/literature   beyond  the  text.   4.  Residue  from  pots  gives  valuable  insight  into   the  Greek  diet.  
  3. Chronology  

  4. “Euphronios  painted  me”   “Euxitheos  made  me”  

  5. Digging  the  Clay  

  6. Se0ling  the  Clay   398 AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ARCHAEOLOGY [AJA

    82 FIG. 6. Modern Greek pottery workshop
  7. Forming  the  Pot  

  8. None
  9. “Pain)ng”  the  Pots  

  10. Black  Figure  

  11. Red  Figure  

  12. White  Ground  

  13. FIG. 7. Munich 1717. Black-figure hydria Dionysos. The mask of

    Dionysos appears on a num- ber of vases, both by itself21 and as part of scenes of open-air location is consistent with the workshop arrangement suggested by the placement of figures Feeding  the  Kiln  
  14. Firing   1.  Oxida)on   2.  Reduc)on   3.  Reoxida)on

      4.  Cooling  
  15. treated raw clay and in the center are two settling

    basins. In the right-hand basin the clay has been cut into slabs for ease of handling. Although both scenes on the Robinson skyphos might be interpreted as showing a simple mass of raw clay, the different types of stippling incision strongly suggest two stages of purification comparable to the effects of the settling basins. Thus the herringbone-hatched mass on side B FIG. 5. Providence 25109. Red-figure lekythos The  Kiln   If  you  will  pay  me  for  my  song,  O  po0ers,   Then  come,  Athena,  and  hold  thy  hand  above  the  kiln!   May  the  kotyloi  and  all  the  kanastra  turn  a  good  black,   May  they  be  well  fired  and  fetch  the  price  asked,   Many  being  sold  in  the  marketplace  and  many  on  the  roads,   And  bring  in  much  money,  and  may  my  song  be  pleasing.   But  if  you  (po0ers)  turn  shameless  and  deceigul,   Then  do  I  summon  the  ravagers  of  kilns,   Both  Syntrips  (Smather)  and  Smaragos  (Crasher)  and              Asbetos  (Unquenchable)  too,  and  Sabaktes  (Shake-­‐to-­‐Pieces)   And  Omodamos  (Conqueror  of  the  Unbaked),  who  makes              much  trouble  for  this  cra].   Stamp  on  stoking  tunnel  and  chambers,  and  may  the  whole  kiln   Be  thrown  into  confusing,  while  the  po0ers  loudly  wail.   As  grinds  a  horse’s  jaw  so  may  the  kiln  grind   To  powder  all  the  pots  within  it.   [Come,  too,  daughter  of  the  Sun,  Circe  of  many  spells,   Cast  cruel  spells,  do  evil  to  them  and  their  handiwork.   Here  too  let  Cheiron  lead  many  Centaurs,   Both  those  that  escaped  the  hands  of  Herakles  and  those  that  perished.   May  they  his  these  pots  hard,  and  may  the  kiln  collapse.   And  may  the  po0ers  wail  as  they  see  the  mischief.   But  I  shall  rejoiced  at  the  sight  of  their  luckless  cra].]   And  if  anyone  bends  over  to  look  into  the  spy-­‐hole,  may  his  whole  face     Be  scorched,  so  that  all  may  learn  to  deal  justly.  
  16. Decora)ve  Mo)fs:  Key  Meander   en though under both handles

    the figure ppears to be the base of the herm behind emphasized in the case of the youth to the B (fig. 2), where the herm base seems over him. mass of material in the center of each sonably be interpreted as clay-but not a parison with classical kilns shows little if nce in shape to the mass here."1 The two d examples for the study of Attic kiln are the seventh century kiln found under uildings at the site of the Tholos in the the fourth century kiln excavated in the 1" Considering the difference in dates, the arkably similar. In both cases, the kiln is in plan and has clay surfacing on the lls. A central column in both examples here was an upper chamber. This could een covered with a dome after the vases cked. The shape is paralleled by the kilns n the Penteskouphia plaquesl4 and on a kythos in Providence'" (fig. 5). The yphos, however, seems to show two some- nt subjects. On both sides the shape of the suggests a truncated cone rather than ristic dome profile of a kiln. Moreover, t of the surface is quite different on the nd in neither case is there any indication e, spyhole or door to the pottery chamber, e of which, from the examples on the uld normally be represented. Neither in surface treatment, then, do these masses ng but the vaguest resemblance to either d or the illustrated kilns. The craftsman- Theseus Painter is too good to allow us his as ineptitude on his part. An alterna- must be sought. ry part of a potter's workshop is a series r the preparation of the raw clay. "This hed . . . by mixing water with the clay he mixture stand in a large settling basin. mpurities fall to the bottom and the upper and water is pumped or bailed into an be seen in the courtyard of a modern Greek pottery workshop17 (fig. 6). At the far left is a mass of un- treated raw clay and in the center are two settling basins. In the right-hand basin the clay has been cut into slabs for ease of handling. Although both scenes on the Robinson skyphos might be interpreted as showing a simple mass of raw clay, the different types of stippling incision strongly suggest two stages of purification comparable to the effects of the settling basins. Thus the herringbone-hatched mass on side B FIG. 5. Providence 25109. Red-figure lekythos
  17. Decora)ve  Mo)fs:  Palme0es  

  18. Decora)ve  Mo)fs:  Ivy  

  19. Decora)ve  Mo)fs:  Egg  and  Dart  

  20. Everyday  Life:  Symposium  

  21. Everyday  Life:  Symposium  

  22. Everyday  Life:  Symposium  

  23. Everyday  Life:  Symposium   Makron  (Painter)  and  Hieron  (Po0er),  Red-­‐Figure

     Kylix   with  Symposium  Scenes,  Greek,  AXc,  c.  480  BCE.  
  24. Everyday  Life:  Fetching  Water  

  25. Everyday  Life:  Fetching  Water   Hydria  with  Fountain  Scene,  Greek,

     AXc,  Black-­‐ Figure,  ca.  510-­‐500  BCE  
  26. Everyday  Life:  Fetching  Water  

  27. Everyday  Life:  The  Toile0e  

  28. Everyday  Life:  The  Toile0e  

  29. Everyday  Life:  The  Toile0e  

  30. Everyday  Life:  The  Toile0e  

  31. Everyday  Life:  Theater  

  32. Everyday  Life:  Theater  

  33. Everyday  Life:  Theater  

  34. Everyday  Life:     Panathenaic  Fes)val  

  35. Everyday  Life:  Panathenaic  Fes)val  

  36. Mythological  Scenes:     Dionysus  and  the  Pirates  

  37. Mythological  Scenes:  Trojan  War  

  38. Mythological  Scenes:  Trojan  War   Ajax  

  39. Mythological  Scenes:  Trojan  War  

  40. Mythological  Scenes  

  41. Mythological  Scenes  

  42. Mythological  Scenes  

  43. Mythological  Scenes  

  44. Cri)cal  Thinking  Ques)ons   1.  Why  are  vases  an  important

     aspect  of  Greek   art  to  study?   2.  How  do  the  form  of  the  pots  correspond  to   their  uses?   3.  How  is  the  painted  decora)on  on  vases   related  to  their  func)ons?   4.  How  are  Greek  vases  a0ributed  to  some   ar)sts?