150 Years - Sabbatarian Adventism

150 Years - Sabbatarian Adventism

Sabbatarian Adventism (1844 - 1860) was the period between the Millerite Movement and the Seventh-day Adventist church when, led by pioneers such as James and Ellen White and Joseph Bates, a foundation was established for what would become the Seventh-day Adventist church. “Sabbatarian” refers to the belief in the observance of the seventh-day Sabbath, and “Adventism” is the belief in the second coming of Christ.

Transcript

  1. Sabbatarian Adventism

  2. Sabbatarian Adventism (1844 - 1860) was the period between the

    Millerite Movement and the official incorporation of the Seventh-day Adventist church. Through the efforts of pioneers such as James and Ellen White and Joseph Bates, a foundation was established for what would become the Seventh-day Adventist church. lSabbatarianz refers to the belief in the observance of the seventh-day Sabbath, and lAdventismz is the belief in the second coming of Christ.
  3. Annie Smith (1860-1931) Named after her deceased aunt by her

    father Uriah Smith, one of the infants of the early movement.
  4. The Hardys The William and Eliza Hardy family were among

    the first black Sabbatarian Adventists and first Seventh-day Adventists, accepting the message around 1857. Featured is their son Eugene.
  5. David Hewitt (1805-1878) One of the earliest non-Millerites to join

    the Sabbatarian Adventists, as well as being the first Seventh-day Adventist convert in Battle Creek, Michigan. In the 1863 General Conference Hewitt moved that lwe take the name Seventh-day Adventists.z
  6. Hiram Edson (1805-1882) Had a revelation in a cornfield of

    the proper understanding of the 2300 days, that Christ had entered the heavenly sanctuary on October 22, 1844, instead of coming to earth.
  7. Cornfield where Edson had realization concerning the sanctuary.

  8. James (1821-1888) and Ellen White (1827-1915) Earliest image of the

    Whites, taken in 1857. The couple co-founded the Seventh-day Adventist church by their ministering, writing, speaking, traveling, and leadership. Ellen`s visions did much to grow and establish the movement.
  9. James and Ellen White were married on August 30,1846, in

    Portland, Maine. They had four children, and stayed together until James` death in 1881.
  10. Flora Cornell One of the children of early Adventism, her

    parents were Meritt and Angeline Cornell.
  11. Schoolhouse in Lovett`s Grove, Ohio, where Ellen White received the

    Great Controversy vision in 1858.
  12. Rachel Oakes Preston (1809-1868) Seventh-day Baptist who persuaded Frederick Wheeler

    to observe the seventh-day Sabbath in early 1844.
  13. Frederick Wheeler (1811 - 1910) Introduced the seventh-day Sabbath to

    Sabbatarian Adventists after being taught it by Rachel Oakes Preston. Probably the first ordained Adventist minister to preach the seventh-day Sabbath.
  14. Moses Hull (1836-1907) Wrote one of the earliest expositions of

    the church`s teaching on the state of the dead. Early Sabbatarian minister who later defected from Adventism.
  15. Prudy Bates (1793-1870) Married Joseph Bates in 1818, bore him

    five children, and was a diligent companion to her husband and supported him exceptionally in his pioneering work in the Adventist church.
  16. Joseph Bates (1792-1872) Along with the Whites, the founder of

    the Seventh-day Adventist church.
  17. The Church at Washington, New Hampshire Reputed to be the

    first Seventh-day Adventist church. History goes back to 1844 when a group of believers in the second advent and the seventh-day Sabbath worshipped in this building.
  18. Uriah Smith (1832-1903) Pioneering editor, author, and theologian.

  19. Annie Smith (1828-1855) Early Adventist poet, author, musician, and artist.

  20. The Andrews John Nevins (1829-1883), Angeline (1824-1872), Charles (1857-1927), and

    Mary (1861-1878) were an important and pioneering early Adventist family.