Upgrade to Pro — share decks privately, control downloads, hide ads and more …

Art and World War I

3700411ae81a5ba151f9946dcb59c386?s=47 nichsara
May 02, 2013
77

Art and World War I

3700411ae81a5ba151f9946dcb59c386?s=128

nichsara

May 02, 2013
Tweet

Transcript

  1. Art  and  the  World  Wars:   Futurism,  Dada,  and  Surrealism

      Reading:   Ar,orms,  369-­‐383     Range:   c.  1908-­‐1940   Futurism,  Dada,  and  Surrealism     Terms/Concepts:   fascism,  bourgeois,  trench  warfare,  anD-­‐ art,  readymade,  dematerializaDon,   Freudian  Psychoanalysis,  Id,  Ego,   Superego,  conscious,  subconscious,  free   associaDon,  automaDsm,  naturalisDc   surrealism,  biomorphic  abstracDon,   froKage,  graKage,  decalcomania,   paranoic-­‐criDcal  method.   Key  Monuments:     Umberto  Boccioni,  Unique  Forms   of  ConBnuity  in  Space,  1913.     Gino  Severini,  The  Armored  Train   in  AcBon,  1915.     22.1  Marcel  Duchamp,   L.H.O.O.Q.,  1919.     22.4  Hannah  Hoch,  The  MulB-­‐ Millionaire,  1923.     22.6  Salvador  Dali,  The   Persistence  of  Memory,  1931.     22.8  Rene  MagriKe,  Portrait,   1935.  
  2. Reminders…   Responses  Due:  Thursday  May  9th     Final

     Exam:  Thursday  May  16th  12:30-­‐2:30  PM    
  3. Pablo  Picasso,  Les  Demoiselles  d’Avignon,  1907.  

  4. Man  Ray,  Portrait  of  Georges  Braque,  Austria,  1922.   Portrait

     of  Pablo  Picasso,  Montmartre,   Paris,  c.  1904.   Picasso  and  Braque  met  in  1907,  but  their  collaboraDon   really  did  not  began  unDl  1908.  
  5. Paul  Cezanne,  Mont  Sainte-­‐Victoire,  1902-­‐1904.  

  6. Paul  Cezanne,  Mont  Sainte-­‐Victoire,  1902-­‐1904.  

  7. Paul  Cezanne,  Mont  Sainte-­‐ Victoire,  1902-­‐1904.   Paul  Cezanne,  The

     Sea   at  L'Estaque,  1885  
  8. Paul  Cezanne,  The  Sea  at  L’Estaque  ,  1885.  

  9. Georges  Braque,   Houses  at  l’Estaque,   1908.  

  10. Georges  Braque,  Houses   at  l’Estaque,  1908.   Paul  Cezanne,

     The  Sea   at  L’Estaque,  1885.  
  11. Pablo  Picasso,  Ma  Jolie,   1911-­‐1912.    

  12. Pablo  Picasso,  Ma  Jolie,  1911-­‐1912.    

  13. Pablo  Picasso,  Ma  Jolie,  1911-­‐1912.    

  14. Georges  Braque,  The   Portuguese,  1911.   Pablo  Picasso,  Ma

      Jolie,  1911-­‐1912.     AnalyDc  Cubism  
  15. Italy:     Futurism   Russia:   Suprema2sm/ Construc2vism  

    Modern  AbstracDon  a[er  Cubism   France:   Purism  
  16. Italy:     Futurism   Russia:   Suprema2sm/ Construc2vism  

    Modern  AbstracDon  a[er  Cubism   France:   Purism  
  17. None
  18. F.C.  Cole\,  Photo  of   F.T.  MarineQ,  c.  1911.  

     
  19. Giacomo  Balla,  Abstract  Speed—The  Car  Has   Passed,  1913.  

    We  declare…that  all  forms  of  imitaDon  must   be  despised,  all  forms  of  originality  glorified… that  all  subject  previously  used  must  be  swept   aside  in  order  to  express  our  whirling  life  of   steel,  of  pride,  of  fever,  and  of  speed…that   movement  and  light  destroy  the  material   bodies.”  
  20. Umberto  Boccioni,  Unique   Forms  of  ConBnuity  in   Space,

     1913.   “a  translaDon,  in  plaster,  bronze,  glass,   wood,  or  any  other  material,  of  those   atmospheric  planes  which  bind  and   intersect  things…Let’s  proclaim  the  absolute   and  complete  aboliDon  of  finite  lines  and   the  contained  statue.    Let’s  split  open  our   figures  and  place  environment  inside  them.     We  declare  that  environment  must  form   part  of  the  plasDc  whole.”  
  21. None
  22. Umberto  Boccioni,  Unique  Forms  of   ConBnuity  in  Space,  1913.

      Nike  (“Victory”)  of  Samothrace,  c.   190  BCE.   Marine\:  “automobile  adorned  with  great  pipes   like  serpents  with  explosive  breath…is  more   beauDful  than  the  Victory  of  Samothrace.”  
  23. Gino  Severini,   Armored  Train  in   AcBon,  1915.  

  24. Gino  Severini,  Armored  Train  in   AcBon,  1915.   Pablo

     Picasso,  Ma   Jolie,  1911-­‐1912.    
  25. World  War  I  broke  out  in  1914.   Allie  =

     England,  France,  Italy,  Russia,  Portugal   Central  Powers:  Germany,  Austria-­‐Hungary,  Turkey  
  26. None
  27. Trench  Warfare,  c.  1914  

  28. BriDsh  Soldiers  OperaDng  a  Vickers  Machine  Gun,  BaKle  of  

    the  Somme,  July  1916.     Gas  Masks   Machine  Gun  
  29. World  War  I  CasualDes  on  the  BaKlefield,  France,  1914.  

    On  the  1916  Front  alone…   850,000  Germans   700,000  French   400,000  BriDsh  
  30. Photographs  and  reconstrucDon  drawings   of  war  injuries,  c.  1917

     
  31. Figure 2. Moulage (painted plaster), Mus:e du Val-de-GrAce, Paris. Photo

    courtesy of Musce du service de sant6 des Arm6es, Val-de-GrAce, Paris. I C . . ALL L.. ? ? .bO'/zLLECIN'N"O Wax  casts  of  war  injuries,  Val-­‐de-­‐Grace   Museum,  c.  1917  
  32. it visible. In its formation of an aesthetic practice aimed

    at critiquing ...... ..... ',? ,% Figure 3. Pair of moulages (painted wax), Musee du Val-de-Grace, Paris. Photo courtesy of Musee du service de sante des Armees, Val-de-Grace, Paris. Wax  casts  of  war  injuries,  Val-­‐de-­‐Grace   Museum,  c.  1917  
  33. BriDsh  soldier  suffering  from  “shell  shock”,  c.  1917.    

    Over  80,000  BriDsh  soldiers  suffered   from  “shell  shock.”  
  34. Zürich:  Key  ArDsts   •  Tristan  Tzara   •  Hugo

     Ball   •  Emmy  Hennings   •  Jean  Arp   •  Marcel  Janco   •  Richard   Huelsenbeck  
  35. A  typical  evening  at  the  Cabaret  Voltaire:  “Tzara  is  

    wiggling  his  behind  like  the  belly  of  an  Oriental  dancer.       Janco  is  playing  an  invisible  violin  and  bowing  and   scraping.    Madame  Hennings,  with  a  Madonna  face,  is   doing  the  splits.    Huelsenbeck  is  banging  away  nonstop   on  the  great  drum,  with  Ball  accompanying  him  on  the   piano,  pal  as  a  chalky  ghost.    We  were  given  the  honorary   Dtle  of  Nihilists.     Cabaret  Voltaire,  Zurich,  c.   1916   Dadaist  Gathering,  Cabaret   Voltaire,  Zurich,  c.  1916  
  36. Hugo  Ball,  Karawane  (Caravan),  1916.  

  37. Zürich:  Key  ArDsts   •  Tristan  Tzara   •  Hugo

     Ball   •  Emmy  Hennings   •  Jean  Arp   •  Marcel  Janco   •  Richard   Huelsenbeck   Berlin:  Key  ArDsts   •  Hannah  Höch   •  Raoul  Hausmann   •  John  Hearpield   •  George  Grosz  
  38. 22.4  Hannah  Hoch,  The  MulB-­‐Millionaire,  1923.   Dada  

  39. To  New  York   Paris:  Key  ArDsts   •  Pablo

     Picasso   •  Jean  Cocteau     •  Erik  SaDe     Marcel  Duchamp   Zürich:  Key  ArDsts   •  Tristan  Tzara   •  Hugo  Ball   •  Emmy  Hennings   •  Jean  Arp   •  Marcel  Janco   •  Richard   Huelsenbeck   Berlin:  Key  ArDsts   •  Hannah  Höch   •  Raoul  Hausmann   •  John  Hearpield   •  George  Grosz     Duchamp  is  consider  an  unaffiliated  arDst  
  40. Man  Ray,  Marcel  Duchamp  as  Rrose   Selavy,  c.  1923.

      Man  Ray,  Marcel  Duchamp,  c.   1921.  
  41. Marcel  Duchamp,  Fountain,  1917.   Readymade  was  the  term  Marcel

     Duchamp  used  to  describe  works  consisDng  of  liKle   more  than  household  items.    Because  they  required  liKle  or  no  arDsDc  manipulaDon   the  were  “readymade.”  
  42. Marcel  Duchamp,  In   Advance  of  the   Broken  Arm,

     1915.   DematerializaDon  of  the  Art  Object  
  43. 22.1  Marcel  Duchamp,   L.H.O.O.Q.,  1919.   Elle  a  chaud

     au  cul     She’s  got  a  hot  ass   L—H—O—O—Q     EL—Ash—Oh—Oh—Kiu      
  44. Psychoanalysis         “To  be  sure,  the  ancient

     belief   that  the  dream  reveals  the   future  is  not  enDrely  devoid  of   truth.  By  represenDng  to  us  a   wish  as  fulfilled  the  dream   certainly  leads  us  into  the   future;  but  this  future,  taken   by  the  dreamer  as  present,  has   been  formed  into  the  likeness   of  that  past  by  the   indestrucDble  wish.”   -­‐-­‐The  InterpretaBon  of  Dreams   1900.   Sigmund  Freud  
  45. Conscious   Subconscious   Logic  &   Reasoning   Higher-­‐

    Consciousness   or  Conscience   Base  Fears  &   Desires   “The  mind  is  like  an  iceberg,  it  floats  with   one-­‐seventh  of  its  bulk  above  water.”   -­‐-­‐Sigmund  Freud  
  46. Sigmund  Freud’s  Sofa,  Freud  Museum,  London.   Rorschach  or  “Inkblot”

     Test   “Free-­‐AssociaDon”  
  47. Surrealism   “SURREALISM,  noun,  masc.,  pure   psychic  automaDsm  by

     which  it  is   intended  to  express,  either  verbally   or  in  wriDng  the  true  funcDon  of   thought.    Though  dictated  in  the   absence  of  all  control  exerted  by   reason,  and  outside  all  aestheDc  or   moral  preoccupaDons,  ENCYL.  Philos.   Surrealism  is  based  on  the  belief  in   the  superior  reality  of  omnipotence   of  the  dream,  an  in  the  disinterested   play  of  though.    It  leads  to  the   permanent  destrucDon  of  all  other   psychic  mechanism  and  to  its   subsDtuDon  for  them  in  the  soluDon   of  the  principal  problems  of  life.”     -­‐-­‐Manifesto  of  Surrealism,  1924.   Andre  Breton  
  48. The  Surrealist  Group,  Paris,  c.  1929.  

  49. Andre  Masson,   AutomaBc   Drawing,  1924.   AutomaDsm:  “the

     true   process  of  thought,   free  from  the  exercise   of  reason  and  from  any   aestheDc  or  moral   purpose.”   -­‐Andre  Breton  
  50. Andre  Breton,  Man  Ray,   Max  Morise,  Yves  Tanguy,  

    Exquisite  Corpse,  1928.  
  51. Max  Ernst,  The  Hoarde,  1927.   FroKage  =  “Rubbing”  

    GraKage=  “Scraping”   “In  striving  more  and  more  to  restrain  my  own  acDve  parDcipaDon   in  the  unfolding  of  the  picture  and  finally,  by  widening  in  this  way   the  acDve  part  of  the  mind’s  hallucinatory  faculDes  I  cam  to  assist  as   a  spectator  at  the  birth  of  all  my  works.”  
  52. Max  Ernst,  Europe  A[er  the  Rain,  c.  1940.   Decalcomania

     =  the  impressions  of  painted  glass.  
  53. Two  Approaches   NaturalisDc  Surrealism   Biomorphic  AbstracDon  

  54. Rene  MagriKe,  The  Treachery  (or  Perfidy),  of  Images,  1928-­‐1929.  

  55. Rene  MagriKe,  Portrait,  1933.   Rene  MagriKe,  Time  Transfixed,  

    1933.  
  56. Rene  MagriKe,  The   Human  CondiBon,  1933.   Rene  MagriKe,

     The   Human  CondiBon,  1933.  
  57. Salvador  Dali,  The  Persistence  of  Memory,  1931.   MelDng  Camembert

      “to  materialize  the  images  to  concrete  irraDonality  with  the  most   imperialisDc  fury  of  precision…in  order  that  the  world  of   imaginaDon  and  of  concrete  irraDonality  may  be  as  objecDvely   evident…as  that  of  the  exterior  world  of  phenomenal  reality.”     paranoic-­‐criDcal  method  
  58. Salvador  Dali,  AccommodaBons  of  Desire,   1929.  

  59. Salvador  Dali,  AccommodaBons  of  Desire,  1929.  

  60. Salvador  Dali,  AccommodaBons  of  Desire,   1929.  

  61. Salvador  Dali,  AccommodaBons  of  Desire,  1929.  

  62. The  ArDst  as  Eccentric   Portrait  of  Salvador  Dali,  c.

     1922   "Take  me,  I  am  the  drug;  take  me,  I   am  hallucinogenic.”   -­‐-­‐Salvador  Dali   "The  only  difference  between  a  crazy   person  and  myself,  is  that  the  crazy   person  believes  they  are  sane.  I  know   that  I'm  crazy.”   -­‐-­‐Salvador  Dali   “SomeDmes,  I  spit  for  fun  on  my   mother’s  portrait”     -­‐-­‐Inscribed  on  one  of  works