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How to find a planet?

How to find a planet?

An introductory talk on NASA's Kepler and K2 missions, presented in August 2017.

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Geert Barentsen

August 01, 2017
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  1. How to find
 a planet? (Not what the actual data

    look like) @GeertHub www.geert.io
 github.com/barentsen
 Geert Barentsen
  2. *

  3. Are we alone?

  4. None
  5. Image: NASA

  6. Detecting Planet Transits

  7. Jupiter Earth Small planets are really hard to find

  8. Jupiter Neptune 2 x Earth Earth Small planets are really

    hard to find
  9. * •need to look at the right place • at

    the right time •and measure the brightness of stars • with extreme accuracy
  10. NASA’s Kepler Mission “Are Earth-like planets common?”

  11. * Kepler was launched on 6 March 2009 Attached to

    a big telescope 100 megapixel camera (100 deg2)
 Makes movies of stars! The Kepler Spacecraft
  12. * March 6, 2009

  13. * The Kepler Field of View

  14. • So what does the data look like?

  15. None
  16. Exoplanet Detections, 1989-1995 Radius Relative to Earth Orbital Period in

    days Earth
  17. Radius Relative to Earth Orbital Period in days Earth Jupiter

    Exoplanet Detections, 1989-1995
  18. Radius Relative to Earth Orbital Period in days Exoplanet Detections,

    1995-2009
  19. Radius Relative to Earth Orbital Period in days Earth Exoplanet

    Detections, 1995-2013
  20. Too big! Just right. Too small!

  21. None
  22. None
  23. None
  24. !24

  25. 2009-2013 Kepler observed 200,000 stars over 4 years, finding 4,496

    candidate planets
  26. And then it BROKE

  27. Balancing Solar Pressure

  28. None
  29. None
  30. Kepler now changes its pointing every 3 months ecliptic This

    is called the K2 Mission
  31. The Pleiades

  32. Photometry of the Seven Sisters

  33. 33

  34. None
  35. !35

  36. None
  37. None
  38. *

  39. *

  40. Are we alone?

  41. None