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Inclusiveness in Open Communities

Inclusiveness in Open Communities

Project Website:
EMBL Bio-IT: https://bio-it.embl.de/

License: GNU Free Documentation License

Abstract:

Bio-IT (https://bio-it.embl.de) at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) (https://embl.org) is a community-driven initiative established in 2010 to support the development and technical capacity of its diverse bio-computational community. There has been a consistent increase in the number of researchers who use computational techniques in their work in the last decade. As of now, ~50% of researchers at EMBL (out of ~600) devote ≥50% of their time to computational work. Several of these members are service staff who dedicate their time to building or maintaining computational infrastructure and providing computational support to others. The Bio-IT community at EMBL has grown organically, aiming to address the various computational needs in research on campus.

As community coordinators of Bio-IT, we provide support to our members by conducting training events on computing skills, developing/maintaining resources for reproducible science, adopting best practices in our workflow, and creating diverse opportunities for open discussions, participation, and networking. EMBL is a member of de.NBI, the German Network for Bioinformatics Infrastructure, which constitutes ELIXIR Germany. This allows Bio-IT to disseminate its resources to different ELIXIR states. Additionally, we collaborate with other Open Science communities such as The Carpentries, Software Sustainability Institute, and Mozilla to exchange expertise, share resources and bring valuable aspects of the larger and more diverse communities into Bio-IT.

In all these efforts, I work at the intersection of community building, bio-computation, and inclusion of underrepresented groups in STEM. In my talk, I will highlight the importance of inclusiveness in open science communities and share some of the lessons learned while adopting them in my work. This talk will benefit other community managers and researchers interested in creating local or virtual sustainable communities and will stimulate discussions around inclusion and representation in technical fields such as computational biology.

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Malvika Sharan

July 25, 2019
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Transcript

  1. Malvika Sharan Computational Biologist & Community Outreach Coordinator Inclusiveness in

    Open Science Communities Bioinformatics Open Source Conference, 25.07.2019 @malvikasharan
  2. About me • Computational biologist in European Molecular Biology Laboratory

    (EMBL)
  3. About me • Computational biologist in European Molecular Biology Laboratory

    (EMBL) • PhD research in bioinformatics (RNA and infection biology), Germany (2016)
  4. About me • Computational biologist in European Molecular Biology Laboratory

    (EMBL) • PhD research in bioinformatics (RNA and infection biology), Germany (2016) • Community outreach and training at European Molecular Biology Laboratory
  5. None
  6. The Global Scientific Communities

  7. Lack of “Global-ness”

  8. “Make research resources available online without price barriers and without

    most permission barriers.” – Suber et. al., 2012 Found a Compromise in Open Science
  9. ‘Open Science is an umbrella term that involves various movements

    to remove barriers from sharing scientific resources at all stages of research’ (FOSTER Project, European Union) Image by @smile_97 on Unsplash
  10. ‘Open Science is an umbrella term that involves various movements

    to remove barriers from sharing scientific resources at all stages of research’ (FOSTER Project, European Union) Open Access Open Source Citizen Science Scientific network Open Educational Open Peer Review Open Notebooks Open Data … Image by @smile_97 on Unsplash
  11. • Research & Engineering is more relevant globally than ever

    • . • . Open Science Communities Related reference: Lars Öhrström, Peter Weiderud, Morsy Abu Youssef, and Omar M. Yaghi, “Global Engagement in Science: The University’s Fourth Mission?” Science & Diplomacy
  12. • Research & Engineering is more relevant globally than ever

    • . • Information sharing (data, code etc.) facilitates advancement of the technologies • . • . Open Science Communities Related reference: Lars Öhrström, Peter Weiderud, Morsy Abu Youssef, and Omar M. Yaghi, “Global Engagement in Science: The University’s Fourth Mission?” Science & Diplomacy
  13. • Research & Engineering is more relevant globally than ever

    • . • Information sharing (data, code etc.) facilitates advancement of the technologies • . • Invite scientific talents to contribute and collaborate Open Science Communities Related reference: Lars Öhrström, Peter Weiderud, Morsy Abu Youssef, and Omar M. Yaghi, “Global Engagement in Science: The University’s Fourth Mission?” Science & Diplomacy
  14. • Research & Engineering is more relevant globally than ever

    • . • Information sharing (data, code etc.) facilitates advancement of the technologies • . • Invite scientific talents to contribute and collaborate • Training facilitates skill transfer and wider use of technologies Open Science Communities Related reference: Lars Öhrström, Peter Weiderud, Morsy Abu Youssef, and Omar M. Yaghi, “Global Engagement in Science: The University’s Fourth Mission?” Science & Diplomacy
  15. • Bioinformatics research • . • Information sharing • .

    • Inclusive efforts • Training. Related reference: Lars Öhrström, Peter Weiderud, Morsy Abu Youssef, and Omar M. Yaghi, “Global Engagement in Science: The University’s Fourth Mission?” Science & Diplomacy Open Science Communities
  16. Lack of “Global-ness” in Open Science Communities • Bioinformatics research

    • . • Information sharing • . • Inclusive efforts • Training. Related reference: Lars Öhrström, Peter Weiderud, Morsy Abu Youssef, and Omar M. Yaghi, “Global Engagement in Science: The University’s Fourth Mission?” Science & Diplomacy
  17. Lack of “Global-ness” in Open Science Communities • Bioinformatics research

    • reproducibility is often not the main concern. • Information sharing • . • Inclusive efforts • Training. • .
  18. Lack of “Global-ness” in Open Science Communities • Bioinformatics research

    • reproducibility is often not the main concern. • Information sharing • not scalable or reusable for those who lack resources. • Inclusive efforts • Training • . • .
  19. Lack of “Global-ness” in Open Science Communities • Bioinformatics research

    • reproducibility is often not the main concern. • Information sharing • not scalable or reusable for those who lack resources. • Inclusive efforts • doesn’t always include/support talents from diverse backgrounds. • Training
  20. Lack of “Global-ness” in Open Science Communities • Bioinformatics research

    • reproducibility is often not the main concern. • Information sharing • not scalable or reusable for those who lack resources. • Inclusive efforts • doesn’t always include/support talents from diverse backgrounds. • Training • not considered a requirement by default.
  21. Moving from Open Science to Inclusive Science https://www.freepik.com/free-photos-vectors/joining-hands

  22. Image by @aaronburden on Unsplash Terminologies: Diversity, Inclusion, Inclusiveness

  23. Image by @huuduong, on Unsplash Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) go

    hand in hand
  24. Image by @huuduong, on Unsplash Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) go

    hand in hand Diversity is the about “attracting different people” of diverse skills, backgrounds, and experiences to work together
  25. Image by @huuduong, on Unsplash Diversity & Inclusion (D&I) go

    hand in hand Diversity is the about “attracting different people” of diverse skills, backgrounds, and experiences to work together Inclusion is about “empowering them” by providing an environment that brings the best of combined skills, backgrounds and experiences
  26. “…inclusion of individuals or groups who were previously excluded” Ref:

    C. Talmage and R. C. Knopf, Springer International Publishing AG 2017, New Dimensions in Community Well-Being Inclusiveness is.. https://www.freepik.com/free-photos-vectors/joining-hands
  27. “…inclusion of individuals or groups who were previously excluded” “...measured

    in terms of eligibility, opportunities, and involvement in decision- making and leadership” Ref: C. Talmage and R. C. Knopf, Springer International Publishing AG 2017, New Dimensions in Community Well-Being Inclusiveness is.. https://www.freepik.com/free-photos-vectors/joining-hands
  28. “…inclusion of individuals or groups who were previously excluded” “...measured

    in terms of eligibility, opportunities, and involvement in decision- making and leadership” “...achieved when members share and not compete for resources or power” Ref: C. Talmage and R. C. Knopf, Springer International Publishing AG 2017, New Dimensions in Community Well-Being Inclusiveness is.. https://www.freepik.com/free-photos-vectors/joining-hands
  29. Inclusion • Process by which a community values, includes and

    involves diversity to improve its well-being Inclusion vs Inclusiveness 8 Ref: C. Talmage and R. C. Knopf, Springer International Publishing AG 2017, New Dimensions in Community Well-Being Inclusiveness • Outcomes of inclusive policies and actions undertaken in a diverse community to improve its well-being Image by @aaronburden on Unsplash
  30. Inclusion • Process by which a community values, includes and

    involves diversity to improve its well-being • Aims towards providing access to community resources to achieve social equality Inclusion vs Inclusiveness 8 Ref: C. Talmage and R. C. Knopf, Springer International Publishing AG 2017, New Dimensions in Community Well-Being Inclusiveness • Outcomes of inclusive policies and actions undertaken in a diverse community to improve its well-being • Aims towards achieving diversity in community leadership and decision makers Image by @aaronburden on Unsplash
  31. https://unsplash.com/photos/IM0GHpsjJic Why is inclusiveness important for Open Communities?

  32. Open Science promotes collaborative work culture It democratizes scientific accessibility

    and engagement
  33. Open Science promotes collaborative work culture It democratizes scientific accessibility

    and engagement Can assure that it will happen
  34. Open Science promotes collaborative work culture It democratizes scientific accessibility

    and engagement Can assure that it will happen
  35. Open Science promotes collaborative work culture It democratizes scientific accessibility

    and engagement Can assure that it will happen • limited funding and infrastructure (economy) • negative encounters based on career stage, culture, language … • from background or identity that is socially stigmatised in past • previously experienced trauma, harassment, or bullying • …
  36. Lack of inclusiveness in Open Science Communities • Bioinformatics research

    • reproducibility is often not the main concern. • Information sharing • not scalable or reusable for those who lack resources. • Inclusive efforts • doesn’t always include/support talents from diverse backgrounds. • Training • not considered a requirement by default. Related reference: Lars Öhrström, Peter Weiderud, Morsy Abu Youssef, and Omar M. Yaghi, “Global Engagement in Science: The University’s Fourth Mission?” Science & Diplomacy
  37. Lack of inclusiveness in Open Science Communities • Bioinformatics research

    • reproducibility is often not the main concern. • Information sharing • not scalable or reusable for those who lack resources. • Inclusive efforts • doesn’t always include/support talents from diverse backgrounds. • Training • not considered a requirement by default. Related reference: Lars Öhrström, Peter Weiderud, Morsy Abu Youssef, and Omar M. Yaghi, “Global Engagement in Science: The University’s Fourth Mission?” Science & Diplomacy Open is not inclusive by default
  38. Promoting inclusiveness in Open Science Communities Open By Design Related

    reference: Lars Öhrström, Peter Weiderud, Morsy Abu Youssef, and Omar M. Yaghi, “Global Engagement in Science: The University’s Fourth Mission?” Science & Diplomacy • Bioinformatics research • should have low barrier for reproducibility. • Information sharing • should be scalable, not limited by resources. • Inclusive efforts • should be welcoming and supportive. • Training • should empower individuals by skill transfer.
  39. Promoting inclusiveness in Open Science Communities Open By Design Related

    reference: Lars Öhrström, Peter Weiderud, Morsy Abu Youssef, and Omar M. Yaghi, “Global Engagement in Science: The University’s Fourth Mission?” Science & Diplomacy • Bioinformatics research • should have low barrier for reproducibility. • Information sharing • should be scalable, not limited by resources. • Inclusive efforts • should be welcoming and supportive. • Training • should empower individuals by skill transfer.
  40. Promoting inclusiveness in Open Science Communities Open By Design Related

    reference: Lars Öhrström, Peter Weiderud, Morsy Abu Youssef, and Omar M. Yaghi, “Global Engagement in Science: The University’s Fourth Mission?” Science & Diplomacy • Bioinformatics research • should have low barrier for reproducibility. • Information sharing • should be scalable, not limited by resources. • Inclusive efforts • should be welcoming and supportive. • Training • should empower individuals by skill transfer.
  41. In addition to scientific methods and techniques, science involves choices

    about what problems and populations to study, and what procedures and measures to use. In making these choices, diverse perspectives and values are important. Presidential column, Diversity Makes Better Science (2012). Association for Psychological Science. Diverse team leads to better outcome
  42. In addition to scientific methods and techniques, science involves choices

    about what problems and populations to study, and what procedures and measures to use. In making these choices, diverse perspectives and values are important. Presidential column, Diversity Makes Better Science (2012). Association for Psychological Science. Diverse team leads to better outcome https://www.visualcapitalist.com/gender-diversity-bottom-line/
  43. A large-scale analysis of bioinformatics code on GitHub Pamela H.

    Russell et. al., 2019, Plos Comp In addition to scientific methods and techniques, science involves choices about what problems and populations to study, and what procedures and measures to use. In making these choices, diverse perspectives and values are important. Presidential column, Diversity Makes Better Science (2012). Association for Psychological Science. Diverse team leads to better outcome but there is a lack of diversity at decision-making level 12.4 % 6.3 % 13.9 % 1708 Bioinformatics GitHub Repos
  44. Katelyn M. Cooper and Sara E. Brownell, Coming Out in

    Class: Challenges and Benefits of Active Learning in a Biology Classroom for LGBTQIA Students. (2016), doi: 10.1187/cbe.16-01-0074. Image: IOP institute of Physics Inclusiveness for well-being of our community members Image on Unsplash by @priscilladupreez
  45. Katelyn M. Cooper and Sara E. Brownell, Coming Out in

    Class: Challenges and Benefits of Active Learning in a Biology Classroom for LGBTQIA Students. (2016), doi: 10.1187/cbe.16-01-0074. Image: IOP institute of Physics Inclusiveness for well-being of our community members Image on Unsplash by @priscilladupreez When the members of the minority groups feel that they need to keep away from specific spaces or interactions to avoid discrimination and maintain professional authority, they also experience isolation that can negatively affect their mental health.
  46. Katelyn M. Cooper and Sara E. Brownell, Coming Out in

    Class: Challenges and Benefits of Active Learning in a Biology Classroom for LGBTQIA Students. (2016), doi: 10.1187/cbe.16-01-0074. Image: IOP institute of Physics Inclusiveness for well-being of our community members When the members of the minority groups feel that they need to keep away from specific spaces or interactions to avoid discrimination and maintain professional authority, they also experience isolation that can negatively affect their mental health. Working for an organization that is more supportive of the LGBTQ+ community is related to higher job satisfaction and lower job anxiety there is still a prevalent view that it is irrelevant to share LGBTQ+ identities in the scientific workplace. Image on Unsplash by @priscilladupreez
  47. Importance of Inclusiveness in my Work

  48. European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) Image copyright: EMBL EMBL is

    a Flagship in Europe that serves as a model for organisational structure in other research institutions
  49. Austria 1974 Denmark 1974 France 1974 Germany 1974 Israel 1974

    Italy 1974 Netherlands 1974 Sweden 1974 Australia 2008 Argentina 2014 India 2018 Switzerland 1974 United Kingdom 1974 Finland 1984 Greece 1984 Norway 1985 Spain 1986 Belgium 1990 Portugal 1998 Member States 24 Associate Member States Ireland 2003 Iceland 2005 Croatia 2006 Luxembourg 2007 Czech Republic 2014 Malta 2016 Hungary 2017 Slovakia 2018 Poland 2014 Lithuania 2015 Prospect Member States EMBL Member States > 1600 people > 80 nationalities
  50. EMBL-EBI Hamburg ~50% of researchers are using bioinformatics tools Percentage

    of bioinformaticians Computation Wet-lab
  51. Bio-IT – Bioinformatics community platform in EMBL Toby Hodges

  52. Bio-IT – EMBL Bioinformatics Capacity Assessment EMBL Bioinformatics Capacity Assessment.

    2009 2012 2015 2019
  53. Bio-IT – EMBL Bioinformatics Capacity Assessment EMBL Bioinformatics Capacity Assessment.

    Average Computational Activities Per year Year % computational activities 2009 2012 2015 2019
  54. Bio-IT – Bioinformatics community platform in EMBL Image by: Toby

    Hodges, Bio-IT, EMBL Training Information sharing Bioinformatics 1. research Inclusive efforts
  55. Community Outreach & Training Deputy Training Coordinator of ELIXIR Germany

    • Provide training in computational skills and bioinformatics • Develop strategies for community engagements and equity • Cooperate with other computational and open source communities
  56. Bio-IT – Training efforts Course Overview • Introductory courses for

    biologists to gain computational skills • Advanced courses for learners to improve skills
  57. Bio-IT – Training efforts Course Overview • Introductory courses for

    biologists to gain computational skills • Advanced courses for learners to improve skills • Including external participants to connect with other researchers
  58. Bio-IT – Training efforts Course Overview • Introductory courses for

    biologists to gain computational skills • Advanced courses for learners to improve skills • Including external participants to connect with other researchers • Teaching in external institutes to improve visibility and exchange values
  59. Bio-IT – Training efforts • Introductory courses for biologists to

    gain computational skills • Advanced courses for learners to improve skills • Including external participants to connect with other researchers • Teaching in external institutes to improve visibility and exchange values • Opportunities for volunteers to teach and gain experience Thea V.R. Wasiu A. Marc G. Florian H. Ivica L. Matt R. Eva-Maria G. Christian T. Jean-Karim H.
  60. Bio-IT – Community assessment EMBL Bio-IT Community Assessment Survey: January

    – March 2019. Total 36 survey respondents Percentage Gender Distribution
  61. Bio-IT – Community assessment EMBL Bio-IT Community Assessment Survey: January

    – March 2019. Total 36 survey respondents Percentage Gender Distribution Current computational activities
  62. Bio-IT – Community assessment EMBL Bio-IT Community Assessment Survey: January

    – March 2019. Total 36 survey respondents Percentage Gender Distribution Current computational activities 70% respondents would like to further increase their computational work Reducing current lab work Increasing PI’s support Consultation by experts Computational collaboration Practice skills with others Get specific training
  63. Bio-IT – Inclusive efforts

  64. • Taskforce meeting with volunteers: involving community members in decision

    making Bio-IT – Inclusive efforts
  65. • Taskforce meeting with volunteers: involving community members in decision

    making • Acknowledging and rewarding volunteers: creating values Bio-IT – Inclusive efforts
  66. • Taskforce meeting with volunteers: involving community members in decision

    making • Acknowledging and rewarding volunteers: creating values • Informal seminars, social events, drop-in sessions: building connections Bio-IT – Inclusive efforts
  67. • Taskforce meeting with volunteers: involving community members in decision

    making • Acknowledging and rewarding volunteers: creating values • Informal seminars, social events, drop-in sessions: building connections • Community capacity and need assessment: feedback to correct our strategies Bio-IT – Inclusive efforts
  68. • Taskforce meeting with volunteers: involving community members in decision

    making • Acknowledging and rewarding volunteers: creating values • Informal seminars, social events, drop-in sessions: building connections • Community capacity and need assessment: feedback to correct our strategies • Annual “Thank you” event: celebrating our contributors and members Bio-IT – Inclusive efforts
  69. Involving Local Community Beyond Bio-IT Informal open events on science

    and related topics
  70. Bringing Global Perspective to Bio-IT Volunteer since 2015 Mozilla Open

    Leader 7 SSI Fellow 2019-20 Supporting since 2012
  71. Join as trainer, mentor, mentee, developer, CoC… https://carpentries.org Co-organized the

    1st CarpentryCon “Feeling of belonging!” The Carpentries courses as official events every year Image Copyright Berenice Batut
  72. Digital Storytelling for Shaping Culture • identifying ways to engage

    • Understanding the reward system • Creating sustainable resources
  73. Digital Storytelling for Shaping Culture • identifying ways to engage

    • Understanding the reward system • Creating sustainable resources 30 stories of 16 women, 11 Men, 3 non-binary • 4 LGBT members, 8 POC, 7 immigrants • 1 teenager
  74. Developing accessible training strategies in smaller communities • Developing central

    learning resources • Reducing dependencies on advanced researchers • Enhancing engagement and sustainability
  75. • Developing central learning resources • Reducing dependencies on advanced

    researchers • Enhancing engagement and sustainability Developing accessible training strategies in smaller communities
  76. plans to develop a community handbook which will be open

    for contributions.
  77. X Image by @dtravisphd on Unsplash My notes on promoting

    inclusiveness
  78. Lead inclusive science by inviting diverse perspectives Image by @ktabori

    on unsplash
  79. Image by @illumire on unsplash Actively share your work with

    others
  80. There are several ways! • Develop sustainable tools • Create

    accessible resources • Create learning materials • Teach a skill • Run a coding club • Learn about policy (specially about the different groups) • Contribute to open movements • …
  81. Image by @clemono2 on Unsplash Shape the culture by engaging

    with your community
  82. Image by @rvignes on Unsplash Support, recommend, acknowledge, advertise, nominate

    and motivate each other. Be an Ally.
  83. Acknowledgements EMBL: Toby Hodges, Toby Gibson, Georg Zeller, Peer Bork,

    Thea van Rossum, Florian Huber, Jean- Karim Herice, Charles Girodot, Jelle Scholtebar, Eva-Maria Geissen, Matt Rogon, Wasiu Akani, Ivica Lahotska, Mattia Forneris, Gregor Moenke, Nicolas Descostes, Michael Hall, Josep Moscardó, Anna Kreshuk, Dominik Kutra, Jurij Pecar, Tom Schwarzl, Mike Smith, Ivan Berest, Christian Tischer … EMBL alumni: Aidan Budd, Marc Gouw, Laura Howes, Bernd Klaus, Holger Dinkel, Frank Thommen, Grischa Tödt, Jonas Hartmann … de.NBI members, Ulrike Trojahn, Daniel Wibberg, Tanja Dammann-Kalinowski ELIXIR EUROPE: Norman Davey, Berenice Batut, Allegra Via, Mateuz Kuzak, Fotis Psaumopoulos. & many collaborators from The Carpentries, Mozilla, Software Sustainability Institute & beyond. Email: sharan@embl.de, malvikasharan@gmail.com. Twitter, GitHub: @malvikasharan