Finding Beauty in the Mundane

Finding Beauty in the Mundane

Amongst the exciting challenges of making software, there are some tasks we try to avoid: linting files, updating dependencies, writing docs. In this talk, you’ll learn how to make even the most mundane development tasks exciting in order to improve your applications and become your team’s hero.

Presented at We Rise Conference on June 24th, 2017

817f5f1ada5fdeffcd14668107c08f0a?s=128

Megan Tiu

June 24, 2017
Tweet

Transcript

  1. Finding Beauty in the Mundane Megan Tiu We Rise -

    June 24, 2017
  2. We can’t love every part of our jobs

  3. Some tasks are less fun than others

  4. How can we love our jobs more?

  5. We must understand and change to make good

  6. Empathy

  7. All computer problems are people problems.

  8. None
  9. Hi there Software Engineer at CallRail Communications Coordinator at Rails

    Girls Atlanta @megantiu on Twitter megantiu on GitHub my name is Megan Tiu I am:
  10. Technical debt

  11. None
  12. I know we can do better

  13. – Caitie McCaffrey The Manager’s Path, Camille Fournier “One of

    the first projects I tackled after becoming the tech lead was to stop all feature development and focus on technical debt…the team reduced the number of critical paging alerts by 50%.”
  14. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

  15. – Apprenticeship Patterns, David Hoover and Adewale Oshineye “What’s the

    grungiest task that your team has been putting off for months?”
  16. – Apprenticeship Patterns, David Hoover and Adewale Oshineye “See if

    you can creatively resolve the problem in a way that exceeds people’s expectations and makes it fun for you.”
  17. What we do is so much more than code

  18. What we do is so much more than best practices

  19. What we do is so much more than prestige

  20. It’s about respect for our teammates

  21. It’s about respect for our users

  22. It’s about respect for ourselves

  23. None
  24. How can we change our perspective?

  25. Updating dependencies

  26. None
  27. • more secure applications

  28. • exposure to the open source community

  29. • more debugging experience

  30. • more familiarity with documentation

  31. • use of supported versions

  32. None
  33. None
  34. Writing Documentation

  35. None
  36. Docs help spread knowledge

  37. Docs help prevent silos

  38. Docs help make onboarding easy

  39. Documentation helps:

  40. Documentation helps: • New developers

  41. Documentation helps: • New developers • Current developers

  42. Documentation helps: • New developers • Current developers • Future

    developers
  43. Documentation helps: • New developers • Current developers • Future

    developers • Support team members
  44. Documentation helps: • New developers • Current developers • Future

    developers • Support team members • You, later
  45. Writing documentation is a concrete way to help others

  46. How can you start?

  47. Make a glossary of common terms

  48. Comment your code as you write it

  49. None
  50. Testing

  51. None
  52. None
  53. – The Pragmatic Programmer, Andrew Hunt and Dave Thomas “Just

    because you have finished hacking out a piece of code doesn’t mean that it’s done.”
  54. • more reliable software

  55. • allows refactoring with peace of mind

  56. • an all-green test suite!!!

  57. None
  58. None
  59. Linting

  60. None
  61. None
  62. • opportunity for a quick win

  63. • learn best practices

  64. • more consistent codebase

  65. None
  66. Establish a style guide

  67. None
  68. None
  69. Refactoring

  70. None
  71. Sometimes it’s necessary

  72. We all want readable code

  73. Refactoring is the closest we have to visual art

  74. $==%

  75. None
  76. None
  77. Refactoring is beautiful ✨

  78. None
  79. Code is beautiful

  80. Software is beautiful

  81. Wrapping up

  82. How can we love our jobs more?

  83. • Updating dependencies • Writing documentation • Testing • Linting

    • Refactoring
  84. Change takes time

  85. Empathy

  86. Better software through empathy

  87. Positivity

  88. Through good development practices, we can make good change together

  89. None
  90. Spread this mindset to your team!

  91. None
  92. Thank you! Software Engineer at CallRail Communications Coordinator at Rails

    Girls Atlanta @megantiu on Twitter megantiu on GitHub Again, my name is Megan Tiu I am:
  93. References • Apprenticeship Patterns, David Hoover and Adewale Oshineye •

    The Manager’s Path, Camille Fournier • The Pragmatic Programmer, Andrew Hunt and Dave Thomas
  94. Thank you! Software Engineer at CallRail Communications Coordinator at Rails

    Girls Atlanta @megantiu on Twitter megantiu on GitHub Again, my name is Megan Tiu I am: