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Style Guides Are The New Photoshop (Smashing Conference 2012)

36857c1095dccf2f2c5ea470dc791530?s=47 Stephen Hay
September 17, 2012

Style Guides Are The New Photoshop (Smashing Conference 2012)

This talk was first presented at Smashing Conference (http://smashingconf.com/).

Use of image editors for creating web design mockups has worked until now, but responsive design is forcing us to find alternatives, as we can't simply create more mockups as we design for more screens. Have no fear, there is at least one method of replacing Photoshop for web design. Let's take a look at one of the most important aspects of this method: the creation of clear, semi-automated, self-updating style guides.

36857c1095dccf2f2c5ea470dc791530?s=128

Stephen Hay

September 17, 2012
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Transcript

  1. STYLE GUIDES ARE THE NEW PHOTOSHOP STEPHEN HAY @ SMASHINGCONF

    2012
  2. DESIGNING IN THE BROWSER Demonstrating our designs to clients as

    XHTML/CSS pages rather than as static Photoshop or Fireworks has streamlined our workflow and helped us to set and manage a client’s expectations better than ever before. Andy Clarke, “Time to stop showing clients static design visuals” (2008)
  3. WALLS COME TUMBLING DOWN (2009) Coming up with new and

    better workflows Designing in the browser Learning to live with constraints Designing systems, rather than sites
  4. PHOTOSHOP IS IMPRACTICAL FOR RESPONSIVE DESIGN MOCKUPS

  5. PROBLEMS WITH “PHOTOSHOP” COMPS Design changes are time-consuming Too much

    manual work The image editor is a dependency Responsive design implies multiple and flexible layouts
  6. REALITY (Screenshots by Adobe Shadow)

  7. WEB TECH IS VERY PRACTICAL FOR RESPONSIVE DESIGN MOCKUPS

  8. WEB-BASED COMPS: THE GOOD Doesn’t need to take much longer

    than Photoshop Automate trivial tasks Realistic presentation / real-life rendering State changes are easily visualized Free and open: everyone has a browser & editor No negative surprises for the client Possible prep for development They can be responsive
  9. WE NEED TWO THINGS TO REPLACE PHOTOSHOP FOR COMPS

  10. 1. Static Web-based Comps 2. Style Guides

  11. STYLE GUIDES

  12. STYLE GUIDES: THE GOOD No measuring State and breakpoint changes

    can be included Useful for future designers, devs & others Design consistency and maintainability
  13. STYLE GUIDES IN THE WILD Apple Identity Guidelines

  14. STYLE GUIDES IN THE WILD BBC GEL

  15. ANNA DEBENHAM’S COLLECTION STYLE GUIDES, PATTERN LIBRARIES & TOOLS TO

    CREATE THEM http://gim.ie/fZyK
  16. MY WEB STYLE GUIDE WISHLIST

  17. Free-form writable

  18. Taking screenshots should be automated

  19. Update code snippets automatically when mockup code changes

  20. Update screenshots automatically when something changes

  21. Elements/modules should not have to be physically split into separate

    files
  22. Syntax highlighting for code

  23. AM I TOO DEMANDING? Free-form writable Automated screenshot-taking Update code

    snippets automatically Update screenshots automatically No separate files for code snippets Syntax highlighting
  24. I COULD NOT FIND A SINGLE TOOL TO DO THIS

  25. Free-form writing DEXY + PANDOC (OR MARKDOWN) FILTER http://www.dexy.it/

  26. Taking screenshots PHANTOM.JS + CASPER.JS http://phantomjs.org/ http://casperjs.org/

  27. Code & screenshot updating JINJA TEMPLATES + DEXY’S IDIOPIDAE FILTER

  28. Syntax highlighting DEXY’S PYGMENTS FILTER

  29. THE COMMAND LINE http://www.flickr.com/photos/evdaimon/337754011/

  30. None
  31. None
  32. None
  33. hi.

  34. Web-based mockup Style guide Style guide content in Markdown HTML

    CSS SCREEN CODE screenshots taken, code snippets extracted How this works
  35. STEPS

  36. 1 Create a web-based mockup Use HTML, CSS & when

    necessary, JavaScript Your goal is to represent the design in the browser Your goal is not to create production code Your CSS should be modular (it will end up in your style guide!)
  37. SMACSS MAKE CSS MORE MODULAR WITH… A LUMBERJACK.

  38. 2 Install Dexy & any dependencies If you’re a designer

    and can’t do it alone, ask a developer’s help. Before you ask for help, try going to the sites and following the instructions as best you can.
  39. 2 Install PhantomJS & CasperJS If you’re a designer and

    can’t do it alone, ask a developer’s help. Before you ask for help, try going to the sites and following the instructions as best you can.
  40. 3 Write your guide and use Jinja templates Use simple

    Markdown links to screenshots. Note the filenames you use.
  41. 4 Script your screenshots with CasperJS Keep things easy by

    adding a new casper.then() for each screenshot. Code brevity is not the goal.
  42. 5 Mark the CSS you want to export An export

    ends when another starts, or with @end.
  43. 6 Run Dexy Wow, that command line stuff is hard.

  44. DONE

  45. Changes in design? Run dexy again. Well, okay. In some

    cases you might want to do dexy cleanup followed by dexy setup and then dexy.
  46. This is not without a learning curve. But what is?

  47. Choose what works for you. Hopefully something here will inspire

    you to find your own way. Experiment!
  48. These are new times. The problems we have with responsive

    workflow should encourage us to examine and evaluate our processes and tools.
  49. OPEN DEVICE LABS http://klick-ass.com/awesomeness/avoid-the-tamagotchis-a-list-of-open-device-labs/

  50. Have fun. Make great stuff. KEEP LEARNING. Thanks! @stephenhay Special

    thanks to Ana Nelson