Digital opportunities for writers? 3 projects, 3 lessons

Adc0a450bdb8652577d49d61dffe450e?s=47 Tony White
March 17, 2015
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Digital opportunities for writers? 3 projects, 3 lessons

I was invited to give a brief talk as part of New Writing North’s series of seminars for students at Northumbria University, addressing the question: How are digital developments disrupting traditional publishing and what new opportunities exist for writers in this sphere?

I presented three brief case studies of the following of my digital literature projects:

Ivy4evr — an interactive SMS drama for mobile phones with Blast Theory for Channel 4

Missorts — a permanent GPS-triggered soundwork for the city of Bristol produced by Situations for Bristol City Council.

Shackleton’s Man Goes South — my latest novel, published by the Science Museum, using an innovative online and on-gallery digital publishing model.

I drew out and elaborated the following lessons or opportunities: Lesson 1: Don’t make assumptions about your audience — research them. Lesson 2: Think beyond the digital object itself. Lesson 3: Don’t wait, collaborate!

Tony White, 17 March 2015

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Tony White

March 17, 2015
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Transcript

  1. Q. How are digital developments disrupting traditional publishing and what

    new opportunities exist for writers in this sphere? Northumbria University, 17 March 2015 Three projects, three lessons. Ivy4evr — interactive drama for mobile phones written for Blast Theory and Channel 4 Missorts — permanent GPS-triggered soundwork for the city of Bristol Shackleton’s Man Goes South — my latest novel published by the Science Museum @tony_white_
  2. @tony_white_

  3. www.ivy4evr.co.uk - See also www.blasttheory.co.uk @tony_white_

  4. @tony_white_

  5. @tony_white_

  6. @tony_white_

  7. @tony_white_

  8. @tony_white_ Lesson 1: Don’t make assumptions about your audience —

    research them. What technology do they use or have access to? Are there existing networks on which you can hitch a ride? Are there existing behaviours that you can use or amplify? What can you learn when the work goes live?
  9. © 2012 Max McClure courtesy Situations @tony_white_

  10. @tony_white_

  11. www.missorts.com @tony_white_

  12. Sara Bowler, Holly Corfield-Carr, Thomas Darby, Jack Ewing, Katrina Plumb,

    Jess Rotas, Hannah Still, Helen Thornhill, Isabel de Vasconcellos and Sacha Waldron © 2012 Max McClure, courtesy Situations www.missorts.com @tony_white_
  13. www.missorts.com http://missorts.com/ @tony_white_

  14. www.missorts.com @tony_white_

  15. @tony_white_

  16. Lesson 2: Think beyond the digital object itself. What kinds

    of interaction are possible, and how might interaction design enhance the reader’s or the audience’s experiences. How is the experience of the work affected by the world outside—whether social relations, GPS satellites, noise pollution or the physical landscape—and vice versa? How will the work be marketed and supported throughout its duration? @tony_white_
  17. @tony_white_

  18. @tony_white_

  19. @tony_white_

  20. http://bit.ly/ShMGSth @tony_white_

  21. Lesson 3: Don’t wait, collaborate! Be active and don’t wait

    until your next or first novel is coming out before thinking about digital possibilities. Find ways to create ‘rapid prototypes’. Can you collaborate with people or organisations outside of the traditional booktrade? If so what can they offer: footfall, data? What can you offer them? As the physical square-footage of the book trade diminishes, look for new ways to go where readers are. @tony_white_
  22. Lesson 3: Don’t wait, collaborate! Be active and don’t wait

    until your next or first novel is coming out before thinking about digital possibilities. Find ways to create ‘rapid prototypes’. Can you collaborate with people or organisations outside of the traditional booktrade? If so what can they offer: footfall, data? What can you offer them? As the physical square-footage of the book trade diminishes, look for new ways to go where readers are. Lesson 2: Think beyond the digital object itself. What kinds of interaction are possible, and how might interaction design enhance the reader’s or the audience’s experiences of your work? How is the experience of your work affected by the world outside—whether social relations, GPS satellites, noise pollution or the physical landscape—and vice versa? How will your work be marketed and supported throughout its duration? Lesson 1: Don’t make assumptions about your audience — research them. What technology do they use or have access to? Are there existing networks on which you can hitch a ride? Are there existing behaviours that you can use or amplify? What can you learn when your work goes live? @tony_white_
  23. Thank you http://pieceofpaperpress.com www.missorts.com http://bit.ly/ShMGSth @tony_white_