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Aquacom: Underwater Visible Light Communication

Aquacom: Underwater Visible Light Communication

This was presented at Indiacom 2018 Conference.
I. Janveja, N. Garg , C. Chawla, J. Parikh, "Aquacom: Underwater Visible Light Communication," The 12th IEEE INDIAcom, 2018

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Chetan Chawla

March 15, 2018
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  1. AQUACOM Underwater Visible Light Communication Presented by Chetan Chawla 1

    Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  2. Table of Contents Visible Light Communication Introduction Applications of VLC

    with special focus on Underwater communication AQUACOM System Design Experimental Results Concluding Remarks 2 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  3. Table of Contents Visible Light Communication Introduction Applications of VLC

    with special focus on Underwater communication AQUACOM System Design Experimental Results Concluding Remarks 3 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  4. Table of Contents Visible Light Communication Introduction Applications of VLC

    with special focus on Underwater communication AQUACOM System Design Experimental Results Concluding Remarks 4 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  5. Visible Light Communication Introduction • Visible Light Communication (VLC) is

    a data communication variant that uses visible light between 400 and 800THz (780-370 nm) • This technology exploits the high switching rates offered by the light emitting diodes. 5 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  6. Introduction • Visible Light Communication (VLC) is a data communication

    variant that uses visible light between 400 and 800THz (780-370 nm) • This technology exploits the high switching rates offered by the light emitting diodes. Visible Light Communication 6 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  7. Applications • Internet anywhere: street lamps, light of vehicles can

    be used to access internet anywhere in footpaths, roads, malls, anywhere where light source is available. • Health sector: Since WIFI is not safe to be used in hospitals and other various health care sectors because it penetrates human body. LIFI can be implemented and well suit in this sector. • Underwater communications: Since radio waves cannot be used under water because these waves are strongly absorbed by sea water within feet of their transmission and this renders it unusable underwater but LIFI is suitable for underwater communication Visible Light Communication 7 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  8. Applications • Internet anywhere: street lamps, light of vehicles can

    be used to access internet anywhere in footpaths, roads, malls, anywhere where light source is available. • Health sector: Since WIFI is not safe to be used in hospitals and other various health care sectors because it penetrates human body. LIFI can be implemented and well suit in this sector. • Underwater communications: Since radio waves cannot be used under water because these waves are strongly absorbed by sea water within feet of their transmission and this renders it unusable underwater but LIFI is suitable for underwater communication Visible Light Communication 8 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  9. Applications • Internet anywhere: street lamps, light of vehicles can

    be used to access internet anywhere in footpaths, roads, malls, anywhere where light source is available. • Health sector: Since WIFI is not safe to be used in hospitals and other various health care sectors because it penetrates human body. LIFI can be implemented and well suit in this sector. • Underwater communications: Since radio waves cannot be used under water because these waves are strongly absorbed by sea water within feet of their transmission and this renders it unusable underwater. Acoustic techniques make a better approach thereby. But they are unstable near the surface where it experiences a gradient. Hence we propose the use of visible light as a means of communication underwater. Visible Light Communication 9 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  10. AQUACOM : Underwater Visible Light Communication Overview • A device

    for establishing wireless communication underwater between divers, explorers, etc. • Near-field communication up-to 2 meters. • Prototyped using Raspberry Pi 3 Model B as the processing unit. • Data rate upto 300bps achieved during experimental tests. 10 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  11. AQUACOM : Underwater Visible Light Communication Overview • A device

    for establishing wireless communication underwater between divers, explorers, etc. • Near-field communication up-to 2 meters. • Prototyped using Raspberry Pi 3 Model B as the processing unit. • Data rate upto 300bps achieved during experimental tests. 11 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  12. AQUACOM : Underwater Visible Light Communication Overview • A device

    for establishing wireless communication underwater between divers, explorers, etc. • Near-field communication up-to 2 meters. • Prototyped using Raspberry Pi 3 Model B as the processing unit. • Data rate upto 300bps achieved during experimental tests. 12 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  13. AQUACOM : Underwater Visible Light Communication Overview • A device

    for establishing wireless communication underwater between divers, explorers, etc. • Near-field communication up-to 2 meters. • Prototyped using Raspberry Pi 3 Model B as the processing unit. • Data rate upto 300bps achieved during experimental tests. 13 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  14. AQUACOM : Underwater Visible Light Communication Overview • A device

    for establishing wireless communication underwater between divers, explorers, etc. • Near-field communication up-to 2 meters. • Prototyped using Raspberry Pi 3 Model B as the processing unit. • Data rate upto 300bps achieved during experimental tests. 14 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  15. System Design AQUACOM : Underwater Visible Light Communication 15 Indiacom’18

    I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  16. System Design The following basic units are packed together as

    a waterproofed device that can be used underwater for communication : • Input Unit : A 4x4 keyboard that takes the message to be transmitted as input. • Transceiver : LEDs for transmitting and photodiode array for receiving data. • Output unit : An LCD screen for displaying or a speaker for sounding the received messages. • Processing Unit : Processes data (transmitted and received) as per the UART protocols and works as a black-box between the other units. AQUACOM : Underwater Visible Light Communication 16 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  17. System Design The following basic units are packed together as

    a waterproofed device that can be used underwater for communication : • Input Unit : A 4x4 keyboard that takes the message to be transmitted as input. • Transceiver : LEDs for transmitting and photodiode array for receiving data. • Output unit : An LCD screen for displaying or a speaker for sounding the received messages. • Processing Unit : Processes data (transmitted and received) as per the UART protocols and works as a black-box between the other units. AQUACOM : Underwater Visible Light Communication 17 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  18. System Design The following basic units are packed together as

    a waterproofed device that can be used underwater for communication : • Input Unit : A 4x4 keyboard that takes the message to be transmitted as input. • Transceiver : LEDs for transmitting and photodiode array for receiving data. • Output unit : An LCD screen for displaying or a speaker for sounding the received messages. • Processing Unit : Processes data (transmitted and received) as per the UART protocols and works as a black-box between the other units. AQUACOM : Underwater Visible Light Communication 18 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  19. System Design The following basic units are packed together as

    a waterproofed device that can be used underwater for communication : • Input Unit : A 4x4 keyboard that takes the message to be transmitted as input. • Transceiver : LEDs for transmitting and photodiode array for receiving data. • Output unit : An LCD screen for displaying or a speaker for sounding the received messages. • Processing Unit : Processes data (transmitted and received) as per the UART protocols and works as a black-box between the other units. AQUACOM : Underwater Visible Light Communication 19 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  20. System Design The following basic units are packed together as

    a waterproofed device that can be used underwater for communication : • Input Unit : A 4x4 keyboard that takes the message to be transmitted as input. • Transceiver : LEDs for transmitting and photodiode array for receiving data. • Output unit : An LCD screen for displaying or a speaker for sounding the received messages. • Processing Unit : Processes data (transmitted and received) as per the UART protocols and works as a black-box between the other units. AQUACOM : Underwater Visible Light Communication 20 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  21. Experimental Results 1. Transmitter - LEDs vs Laser diodes •

    LED : Data Rate = 300bps Distance Range = 1-2 meters • Laser Diode : Data Rate = 400bps Distance Range = 3-4 meters Laser diode transmitter requires precise aligning before the receiver. Therefore, LED transmitter was chosen. AQUACOM : Underwater Visible Light Communication 21 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  22. Experimental Results 1. Transmitter - LEDs vs Laser diodes •

    LED : Data Rate = 300bps Distance Range = 1-2 meters • Laser Diode : Data Rate = 400bps Distance Range = 3-4 meters Laser diode transmitter requires precise aligning before the receiver. Therefore, LED transmitter was chosen. AQUACOM : Underwater Visible Light Communication 22 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  23. Experimental Results 1. Transmitter - LEDs vs Laser diodes •

    LED : Data Rate = 300bps Distance Range = 1-2 meters • Laser Diode : Data Rate = 400bps Distance Range = 3-4 meters Laser diode transmitter requires precise aligning before the receiver. Therefore, LED transmitter was chosen. AQUACOM : Underwater Visible Light Communication 23 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  24. Experimental Results 1. Transmitter - LEDs vs Laser diodes •

    LED : Data Rate = 300bps Distance Range = 1-2 meters • Laser Diode : Data Rate = 400bps Distance Range = 3-4 meters Laser diode transmitter requires precise aligning before the receiver. Therefore, LED transmitter was chosen. AQUACOM : Underwater Visible Light Communication 24 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  25. Experimental Results 2. Receiver - Photodiodes vs Photo-resistors (LDR) AQUACOM

    : Underwater Visible Light Communication Property under observantion PHOTODIODES PHOTO-RESISTORS Response Time High Low Maximum achievable Baud Rate High Low 25 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  26. Experimental Results 2. Receiver - Photodiodes vs Photo-resistors (LDR) AQUACOM

    : Underwater Visible Light Communication Property under observantion PHOTODIODES PHOTO-RESISTORS Response Time High Low Maximum achievable Baud Rate High Low 26 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  27. Experimental Results 2. Receiver - Photodiodes vs Photo-resistors (LDR) AQUACOM

    : Underwater Visible Light Communication Property under observantion PHOTODIODES PHOTO-RESISTORS Response Time High Low Maximum achievable Baud Rate High Low 27 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  28. Experimental Results 2. Receiver - Photodiodes vs Photo-resistors (LDR) AQUACOM

    : Underwater Visible Light Communication Property under observantion PHOTODIODES PHOTO-RESISTORS Response Time High Low Maximum achievable Baud Rate High Low 28 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  29. Experimental Results 2. Receiver - Photodiodes vs Photo-resistors (LDR) AQUACOM

    : Underwater Visible Light Communication Property under observantion PHOTODIODES PHOTO-RESISTORS Response Time High Low Maximum achievable Baud Rate High Low 29 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  30. Concluding Remarks With the recent uproar in the field of

    communication about LiFi, the area has been leveraged with significant research being done in the area. It might not be a feasible idea to replace the entire existent infrastructure to incorporate light as a medium of communication by replacing existent wireless RF systems. However, visible light communication can establish itself as a standard where the standard RF systems fail. This is what we aimed to do with AQUACOM for underwater communication. 30 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  31. Future Scope Aquacom can be used as a framework for

    a number of applications for underwater communication. In addition to the communication application for divers, it can be used as a form of communication in various underwater vehicles. Visible light has benefits over both RF communication (Strong absorption) and Acoustic techniques. They also have application to replace the existing light house technology. 31 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  32. References 32 [1] Griffiths, H., Cohen, L., Watts, S., Mokole,

    E., Baker, C., Wicks, M. and Blunt, S., 2015. Radar spectrum engineering and management: Technical and regulatory issues. Proceedings of the IEEE, 103(1), pp.85-102. [2] VK5BR, L.B., 1987. Underwater radio communication. Originally published in Amateur Radio. [3] Lanbo, L., Shengli, Z. and Jun Hong, C., 2008. P r o s p e c t s a n d p r o b l e m s o f w i r e l e s s communication for underwater sensor networks. Wireless Communications and Mobile Computing, 8(8), pp.977-994. [4] Garcia, M.; Sendra, S.; Atenas, M.; Lloret, J. Underwater wireless adhoc networks: A survey. In Mobile Ad hoc Networks: Current Status and Future Trends; CRC Press: Boca Raton, FL, USA, 2011; pp. 379– 411. [5] Stojanovic, M.,“Underwater acoustic communication”, in Wiley Encyclopedia of Electrical and Electronics Engineering; John Wiley & Sons: New York, NY, USA, 1998; pp. 688–698. [6] Jaime Lloret , Sandra Sendra , Miguel Ardid and Joel J. P. C. Rodrigues, “Underwater Wireless SensorCommunications in the 2.4 GHz ISM Frequency Band”, Sensors 2012, 12, 4237-4264; doi:10.3390/s120404237. [7] R. Somaraju and J. Trumpf, “Frequency, temperature and salinity variation of the permittivity of seawater,” IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag., vol. 54, no. 11, pp. 3441–3448, 2006. [8] Giovanni Giuliano, Lionel W. J. Kent, Leslie Andrew J. Williams, Leslie L. Laycock, Michael S. Griffith, Andrew G. McCarthy, Duncan P. Rowe, "Acquisition and tracking for underwater optical communications," Proc. SPIE 10437, Advanced Free-Space Optical Communication Techniques and Applications III, 1043707 (6 October 2017) [9] C. Laycock, "Underwater Wireless Acousto- Optic Waveguide (UWAOW)," Proc. SPIE 10437, Advanced Free-Space Optical Communication Techniques and Applications III, 1043708 (6 October 2017) Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla, J Parikh
  33. References 33 [10] Giuliano, G., Viola, S., Watson, S., Laycock,

    L., Rowe, D., and Kelly, A. E., “Laser based underwater communication systems,” in [Transparent Optical Networks (ICTON), 2016 8th International Conference on], 1–4, IEEE (2016). [11]F.Akhoundi, J.A.Salehi,Tashakori,“Cellular u n d e r w a t e r w i r e l e s s o p t i c a l C D M A network:Performance analysis and implementation concepts,”IEEE transaction and communciation, vol. 63, no. 3, pp. 882–891, Mar. 2015. [12] S. J. Tang, Y. H. Dong, and X. D. Zhang, “Impulse response modeling for underwater wireless optical communication links,” I E EETr a n s . C o m m u n . , vol. 62, no. 1, pp. 882–891, Jan. 2014. [13] Chao Wang, Hong-Yi Yu, and Yi-Jun Zhu, “A Long Distance Underwater Visible Light Communication System With Single Photon Avalanche Diode”, IEEE photonics journal, Volume 8, Number 5, October 2016. [14] W. C. Cox, “Simulation, modeling, and design of underwater optical communication systems,” Ph.D. dissertation, Elect. Eng. Dept., North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA, 2012. [15] J. W. Giles and I. N. Bankman, ‘‘Underwater optical communications systems. part 2: Basic design considerations,’’ in Proc. IEEE Military Commun. Conf. vol. 3. 2005, pp. 1700–1705. [16] T. Petzold, “Volume scattering functions for selected ocean waters,” Scripps Institution of Oceanography, visibility Laboratory, San Diego, CA, USA, Oct. 1972. [17] Wang, W.C., 2011. Optical Detectors. Seattle: Department of Mechanical Engineering-University of Washington. [18] "Universal asynchronous receiver-transmitter", En.wikipedia.org. [Online].Available:https:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_asynchron ous_receiver-transmitter. [19] N. Garg, J.Parikh. ``Wireless transceiver design for visible light communication", ICICI, India, 2017. [20] Y. G Wang, X. X Huang, L. Tao, and N. Chi, “1.8-Gb/s WDM visible light communication over 50-meter outdoor free space transmission employing CAP modulation and receiver diversity technology,” in proceedings of Optical Fiber Communication conference, 2015, pp. 1– 4. [21] M. L Zhang, P. Zhao, and Y. J Jia , “A 5.7 Km visible light communications experiment demonstration,” in proceedings of 7th International Conference on Ubiquitious Future Networks, 2015, pp. 1–3.
  34. Thank You. 34 Indiacom’18 I Janveja, N Garg, C Chawla,

    J Parikh chchawla@yahoo.co.in