Digital = People = Social = Learning

Digital = People = Social = Learning

“Digital” is a core aspect of our modern world, however we must not lose sight of the human-factor when we use digital tools and systems as part of our teaching and learning experiences.

In his keynote presentation, ‘Digital = People = Social = Learning’, Simon will explore three core questions set out by Paul LeBlanc in his article The Human-Technology Intersection: A Framework:

1. What human interactions are most critical for student success?

2. How can technology enable better versions of those interactions?

3. Where can technology replace people so that human resources can be redirected to accomplish more of those interactions?

These questions will be explored in relation to social interaction, framed within the context of social learning theory and the role of “digital” within this complex relationship.

Pre-reading

The keynote session will be “flipped” in the sense that there is a small amount of pre-reading required of Paul LeBlanc’s Educause article. There is also an interactive Padlet space for some initial thoughts and comments relating to question one, which you are invited to contribute to before the conference.

Please bring a web-enabled device with you to the keynote session if you have one.

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Simon Thomson

January 30, 2019
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Transcript

  1. None
  2. 'Digital = People = Social = Learning‘ Simon Thomson Director,

    Centre for Innovation in Education @digisim
  3. Part One: Social (and People)

  4. None
  5. Behaviour Personal Factors Environmental Factors Bandura and Walters 1963 Social

    Learning Theory
  6. “Learning is not purely behavioural; rather, it is a cognitive

    process that takes place in a social context.”
  7. “Humans are highly social beings. We like to be surrounded

    by friends and share our personal experiences with others.” Pascal Vrticka Social neuroscientist
  8. “Society” /səˈsʌɪɪti/ “group of individuals involved in persistent social interaction”

  9. Part One Xtra: Social (Media) (and People)

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  16. Part Two: People (and social)

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  20. Learning is often seen an individual endeavour.

  21. But learning together deepens our understanding.

  22. Universities are places of social connectivity.

  23. Part Three: Digital (and social)

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  26. “The lure of Facebook for university students has grown in

    recent years, with many defecting from institution provided formal online tuition spaces to student-led, study- focused groups on the social media platform.” Coughlan, Tony and Perryman, Leigh-Anne (2015). Are student-led Facebook groups open educational practices? In: OER15, 14-15 Apr 2015, Cardiff. Student Led Groups
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  31. Part Four: Digital (and learning)

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  33. Value of Physical Presence

  34. Benefit of Digital Connection

  35. 1. What human interactions are most critical for student success?

    2. How can technology enable better versions of those interactions? 3. Where can technology replace people so that human resources can be redirected to accomplish more of those interactions? https://padlet.com/digisim/human_interactions
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  37. Part Five: Curriculum Design ('Digital = People = Social =

    Learning)
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  39. 1. What face-to-face interactions are most critical for our on

    campus student learning? 2. How can technology enable / enhance / enrich / support those interactions? 3. Where can technology replace less valued face-to-face interactions to increase engagement? https://padlet.com/digisim/human_interactions
  40. “Human-Factor”

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