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Berlin 2013 - Session - Jarkko Laine

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September 19, 2013
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Berlin 2013 - Session - Jarkko Laine

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Monitorama

September 19, 2013
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Transcript

  1. LET YOUR DATA TELL A STORY Jarkko Laine

  2. @jarkko jlaine.net

  3. None
  4. BEAR METAL bearmetal.eu

  5. BÄR METAL

  6. METAL BÄR

  7. METAL BEER

  8. METAL BEER

  9. BEAR METAL

  10. Tim Lenz, CC http://www.flickr.com/photos/59323989@N00/2851930098/

  11. None
  12. ~100 INFECTED 13 DEAD

  13. DUALITY OF THE MIND a farce in 2 acts

  14. DUALITY OF THE MIND a farce in 2 acts duality

    of the
  15. Act 1 Brain pixels and the human RAM

  16. None
  17. None
  18. DIFFERENT

  19. DIFFERENT Person

  20. DIFFERENT Person Hair color

  21. DIFFERENT Person Hair color Clothing

  22. DIFFERENT Person Hair color Clothing Gender

  23. DIFFERENT Person Hair color Clothing Gender 50% still didn’t notice

  24. OUR ATTENTION CAPABILITY IS HIGHLY LIMITED

  25. COMES DOWN TO TWO THINGS

  26. 1. OUR FOCUS OF VISION IS VERY SMALL

  27. HUMAN CMOS CONSISTS OF BRAIN PIXELS VERY SHARP IN THE

    MIDDLE (FOVEA) TERRIBLE AT THE EDGES
  28. None
  29. 2. OUR WORKING MEMORY IS TINY

  30. SHORT TERM WORKING MEMORY IS A BIT LIKE RAM OR

    CACHE
  31. SHORT TERM WORKING MEMORY IS A BIT LIKE RAM OR

    CACHE IN A PREHISTORICAL COMPUTER
  32. WORKING MEMORY CAN HOLD ONLY 3-4 PIECES OF INFORMATION SIMULTANEOUSLY

  33. DEMO VIDEO

  34. So what? Minimize eye fixations Maximize data-ink ratio

  35. Act 2 Thinking, fast and slow

  36. Give it your best shot

  37. The two minds System 1 & 2

  38. System 1 Fast Intuitive Automatic

  39. System 2 Conscious Rational Slow Laborious Logical

  40. System 2 Conscious Rational Slow Laborious Logical Lazy and trusts

    System 1
  41. Availability bias We prefer wrong information to no information

  42. The plural of “anecdote” is not “data”.

  43. Conjunction Fallacy The more vividly something is presented, the more

    likely it is for us to believe it is true.
  44. “My science is Evan, and he’s at home. That’s my

    science,” – Jenny McCarthy
  45. “To paraphrase George Lucas: So this is how science dies

    — to thunderous applause? In the court of public opinion, data, and statements, and science are no match for an emotional parent and her child.” — Saul Hymes
  46. Story fallacy We want our lives to form a pattern

    that can be easily followed.
  47. Story fallacy If facts don’t match the narrative, we retrofit

    them.
  48. Story fallacy Example: Apple is doomed just like with PCs

    in the 80’s
  49. RESULT: Measles, once eliminated from the US, is on the

    rise again – almost completely in the anti-vaccine communities.
  50. You think you’re immune to these biases?

  51. Overconfidence Effect We systematically overestimate our knowledge and our ability

    to predict
  52. Overconfidence Effect Experts suffer at least as much as laymen

  53. We are all biased

  54. But let’s not be negative

  55. Storytelling is a super- powerful way to get your point

    across
  56. Storytelling is a super- powerful way to get your point

    across WHY?
  57. A story can put your whole brain to work.

  58. "When the woman spoke English, the volunteers understood her story,

    and their brains synchronized. When she had activity in her insula, an emotional brain region, the listeners did too. When her frontal cortex lit up, so did theirs. By simply telling a story, the woman could plant ideas, thoughts and emotions into the listeners' brains." Uri Hasson, Princeton University
  59. We are evolutionary wired to listen to stories.

  60. Things needed in a good story 1. A hero 2.

    A goal 3. An obstacle 4. A mentor 5. A moral
  61. Telling stories with data Much harder than verbally

  62. Telling stories with data Create continuum, narrative, animate

  63. Telling stories with data Integrate information presented

  64. Telling stories with data Create relevant emotions and affect

  65. Telling stories with data Help link to existing knowledge

  66. Telling stories with data Make your message more memorable and

    likely to impact behavior.
  67. source: http://wtfviz.net/post/60861129846/in- the-future

  68. Telling stories with data Rule #1: It has to make

    sense
  69. Telling stories with data See Hans Rosling’s TED talks

  70. In closing...

  71. 2 things to remember 1. Our attention and short term

    memory are limited. Don’t overestimate them. Plan for this and give them a hand with visual cues.
  72. 2 things to remember 2. Storytelling is important because it

    works – it makes people understand and remember things better.
  73. If you’re into data visualizations, you’re not in the data

    business – you’re in the human communications business.
  74. Thank You @jarkko