Don't touch the monolith; or, How lateral architecture design can satisfy your users

Don't touch the monolith; or, How lateral architecture design can satisfy your users

Research shows that prisoners’ reoffending rates are significantly lowered if they have frequent contact with friends and family on the outside. Booking social visits with prisoners used to involve mailing a paper form to the visitor, who would then have to phone the prison—and could spend two hours or more on hold. In September 2014, the Ministry of Justice Digital launched Prison Visit Booking, which allows visits with prisoners to be booked online through GOV.UK.

How can you integrate with an unchangeable monolith that thousands of prison staff use every day to run the UK’s prisons, while rapidly iterating on a citizen-facing visit booking service?

Steve Marshall shows how a combination of some decades-old technologies, a carefully crafted user interface, and staff in prisons made it possible to build a visit-booking service with 90% user satisfaction, all without changing the backend system. Steve also explores how to architect systems to chip away at legacy monoliths while improving your users’ experience and discusses what all of this means for how you architect your systems.

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Steve Marshall

October 21, 2016
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