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Amateur Media Production on Linux

Amateur Media Production on Linux

Its a common misconception that Linux is not robust enough to be a full fledged media editing machine. I've spent quite a while sifting through the tools and putting together an amateur studio. I'll be sharing my insight into the software, hardware, and services that will expedite your endeavours to be a content creator on the Linux Desktop.

We will be covering audio production, distribution, and the hardware to get you started with your own in-house audio workshop. We will also briefly touch the subject of Video content production, and distribution mediums as well.

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Charles Butler

March 15, 2015
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Transcript

  1. Amateur Media Production On Linux

  2. Charles Butler @lazypower About Me

  3. What I do

  4. What I do

  5. Why? • To prove it could be done • Relatively

    low cost of entry • I like the sound of my voice • Houston TX – 90's Electronic Scene • Blow off steam
  6. None
  7. Understanding from the basement up

  8. Lets talk about Audio Audio tooling has come a LONG

    way on Linux
  9. Audio Subsystems There are many layers to the Linux Audio

    Subsystem with many choices on how they are put together.
  10. Audio Subsystems

  11. Audio Subsystems Alsa • kernel level, provides HW access and

    Software API • Enabler of many sound-bridge/servers • Runs anywhere the linux kernel does • multiplexing out can be difficult
  12. Audio Subsystems Pulse Audio • Layers around Alsa and Port

    Audio and Jack(!) • has many plugins • supports multi-soundcards • corrects clock drift • notoriously a pain in the butt
  13. Audio Subsystems Jackd2 • Best thing since sliced bread •

    not friendly... • like, at all. • Seriously. • realtime priority for flawless audio • Supports virtual audio devices and Studio production
  14. Audio Subsystems • aRts, the KDE 3 soundserver. • Phonon,

    the multimedia framework provided by Qt 4 and used in KDE 4. • EsounD, the Enlightened Sound Daemon. • NAS, the Network Audio System. • NMM, Network-Integrated Multimedia Middleware.
  15. Breakdown • Alsa – its OK for production – Great

    for everyday usage. • Pulse – You might as well forget doing anything advanced, unless bound as a sync input device for jack. • Jack – AMAZING For production – forget having sound in anything else... Studio use only.
  16. Audio Subsystems

  17. Audio looks hard

  18. In most cases, devices will “just work” (tm)

  19. Hardware

  20. DIY Studio You can build your own Audio Studio for

    less than $150 on Amazon.com
  21. Hardware Retails for: $?? on Amazon - RUNS LINUX (bonus

    points for Ubuntu) - ~ 4GB of RAM - 500GB of DISK (I suggest more) A standard desktop computer
  22. Hardware Retails for: $28.16 on Amazon - Stereo Mic support

    - 7.1 Surround Audio - Digital Audio Out - USB 3.0 - ALSA Compliant StarTech 7.1 USB Audio Adapter
  23. Hardware Retails for: $61.00 on Amazon - Plug-and-play - Hypercardioid

    pickup pattern - 16-bit, 48kHz resolution - Smooth, flat frequency response of 20Hz – 18kHz - Warm tones, sometimes booming bass SAMSON C01U Condenser Mic
  24. Auxillary HW Retails for: $15.45 on Amazon - Supports most

    Mics - Recommended to use a shockmount to isolate Noise that originates on the boom arm itself. NEEWER Microphone Suspension Boom
  25. Auxillary HW Retails for: $29.95 on Amazon - Isolates mic

    from physical vibration, floor, and stand noise Samson SP01 Spider Shockmount
  26. Total: $ 134.56 (PC not included)

  27. This will get you through 90% of your AUDIO workstation

    needs. Entry level build, perfect for: - Podcasters - Amateur DJ's - Hobbyists
  28. What about musicians? Multi-Channel audio inputs? DIY home studio enthusiasts?

  29. Hardware Alesis MultiMix 4 USB Four-Channel USB Mixer Retails for:

    $59.99 on Amazon - Plug-and-play - 2 Channels of XLR inputs w/ gains - High impedance guitar input - Main and Headphone outs with independent levels
  30. DJ Gear

  31. DJ Gear Retails for: $125.51 on Amazon - Plug-and-play (mostly)

    - 2 Deck Controller and Mixer Controls - Built in 4 channel playback - Entry Level, but great for cutting teeth. Tiny Jog Wheels kind of suck :( - You wont be scratchmaster skrizzle, but you'll learn to mix like a pro with something like this Hercules DJ Control Instinct
  32. D.A.W. D.igital A.udio W.orkstations

  33. Open Source

  34. LMMS • Fully Open Source • Some DSP Support with

    LV2 • Multi-Track Multi- Channel MIDI / MOD creation • tracker/sequencer/sy nth
  35. Ardour • Fully Open Source • Some DSP Support with

    LV2 • Multi-Track Multi- Channel audio creation • Supports Live Instrument • Kind of unstable (crash happy, crash often)
  36. Proprietary

  37. Renoise • Picture doesn't do it justice • Fully programmable

    API • Supports Tracker style music creation • $89
  38. Tracktion6 • Single Screen • DSP Support • Extremely Light

    Weight • Beginner Friendly • $60
  39. Bitwig Studio • DSP Support • Advanced Sound Panels •

    3 Modes for editing and creation • Virtual and Real instrument • Patch panel, effecting, and advanced sound routing
  40. Bitwig Studio

  41. Bitwig Studio Comprehensive But Expensive $299.99

  42. Audio Tools (Non DAW)

  43. Audacity • Best bang for your buck • Available on

    every platform • Can be finicky • Used in 100% of my post produced files, for cleanup and noise reduction
  44. Ocenaudio • Free but not Libre • All you need

    for basic podcasting • Lightning Fast audio editing / exporting • Cross Platform • VST Plugin support • Powerful, and beginner friendly
  45. Broadcasting (client)

  46. Internet DJ Console • Station Automation • Dead simple to

    use • Supports multiple outputs, inputs, VOIP calling inputs, DJ inputs, Individual level monitoring, soundboards, EQ, Playlists ...
  47. MIXXX • Cross Platform • Live Mixing – DJ's •

    Supports Audio Streaming (picky, unintuitive) • Pro Quality – used by instructors, hobbyists, and some pros
  48. Broadcasting (server)

  49. Shoutcast • Free but not open • D.N.A.S. is the

    most widely used setup • Active Listing @ shoutcast.com w/ registration • Mp3 / aac based
  50. Icecast • FLOSS • Highly customizeable • Supported by most

    broadcasters • OGG/Theora based
  51. Audio Pipeline

  52. Qjackctl

  53. Patchage Patchage Software Mixing Retails for: $0 on all platforms

    that support jack - Supports dry and 'wet' inputs - Patch between soundcards - Patch between applications - Create virtual mix panels to control audio levels (and effects if using a DSP mixer)
  54. None
  55. Audio Sources

  56. Fiverr

  57. CreativeCommons • Freesound.org • Search.creativecommons.org • Ccmixter.com • Soundcloud.com •

    Audionautix • Incompetech • CCTrax • AudioFarm
  58. Free but not CC • BeatProduction.net • AudioBombs.com (DSP Filters

    and Instrument Kits) • Freesamplepacks.net • Freedrumkits.net
  59. PayToPlay • Beatport • Audio Jungle • DJTechTools • LucidSamples

    • Loopmasters.com • Vengeance-sound
  60. Tips and Tricks

  61. Tip 1 Prepare a Script / Setlist

  62. Tip 2 Leave 3 seconds of “silence” at the beginning

    and end of your recording
  63. Tip 3 Dry run with any third party tools/people used

    in the production
  64. Tip 4 Use Creative Commons material where you can.

  65. Tip 5 Consider mobile users when doing live- streaming.

  66. Tip 6 Use caution when changing input pipes on live

    inputs in Jack.
  67. Video

  68. Lightworks • Free to use, Subscription to unlock • Moderate

    learning curve • Hollywood movies have been created with Lightworks
  69. OpenShot • FLOSS • Lightweight, fast, and great for home-

    production • Used by many linux based vodcasts
  70. Blender • FLOSS • Really Powerful, like ZOMG • 3d

    Compositing, and Effects + modelling • Never used it, because blender confuses me
  71. Kdenlive • FLOSS • Has a LiveCD Studio Edition •

    I've never used it
  72. Video (RTMP)

  73. Jitsi • Audio / Video calls • Desktop Streaming •

    Call Recording • Encryption • H.264 Video Encoding • Accountless • Open Source
  74. Red5 • Open Source • Flash Server written in Java

    • Difficult setup, limited client support, relies on FLASH for clients
  75. Wowza • Commercial / Proprietary • Java Based – simple

    setup • Has Flash/HTML5 player components • $65/server/mo
  76. Video (Broadcasting / utility)

  77. Open Broadcaster • FLOSS • Linux is in BETA •

    A bit buggy, but works really well • Stream & Record • Uses Twitch.tv as an RTMP server (or wowza or red5) • Install Instructions
  78. Simple Screen Recorder • FLOSS • Super simple to use,

    noob friendly • Faster than VLC and ffmpeg/avconv • Can do Live Streaming (experimental)
  79. Thats all, Be Creative!

  80. Charles Butler @lazypower About Me Questions / Comments?