Incentivizing and Sustaining Open Source

0e2948f19a7dacdf4085d7d33093f260?s=47 Eric Berry
October 07, 2018

Incentivizing and Sustaining Open Source

0e2948f19a7dacdf4085d7d33093f260?s=128

Eric Berry

October 07, 2018
Tweet

Transcript

  1. this is not a talk about

  2. this is a talk about you

  3. Eric Berry @coderberry

  4. !4

  5. !5

  6. !6

  7. !7

  8. None
  9. Open Source

  10. Open Source Royalty-free redistribution of the program https://www.thesoftwareguild.com/blog/open-source-motivation/

  11. Open Source Royalty-free redistribution of the program https://www.thesoftwareguild.com/blog/open-source-motivation/ Release of

    the source code
  12. Open Source Royalty-free redistribution of the program https://www.thesoftwareguild.com/blog/open-source-motivation/ Release of

    the source code Modifications retain the original software license
  13. Open Source Fix or Improve Code https://www.thesoftwareguild.com/blog/open-source-motivation/

  14. https://www.zdnet.com/article/its-an-open-source-world-78-percent-of-companies-run-open-source-software/ 96% of applications use Open Source

  15. https://www.blackducksoftware.com/download/2018-open-source-security-and-risk-analysis-infographic On average, 57% of the code was from Open

    Source
  16. http://openforumacademy.org/library/ofa-fellows-reference-library/Hosted%20Files/OSS-daffara-notes.pdf/at_download/file

  17. Å https://www.developer-tech.com/news/2015/oct/14/measuring-value-open-source/ $387 billion

  18. Å https://www.developer-tech.com/news/2015/oct/14/measuring-value-open-source/ $387 billion Equivalent to 1.7B ETH or 58.8M

    Bitcoin
  19. Å https://www.developer-tech.com/news/2015/oct/14/measuring-value-open-source/ $387 billion

  20. What motivates us to
 work on Open Source?

  21. None
  22. Intrinsic Extrinsic https://www.thesoftwareguild.com/blog/open-source-motivation/

  23. Intrinsic Extrinsic when you do something because you enjoy it

    or find it interesting when you do something for external rewards or to avoid negative consequences
  24. Intrinsic Extrinsic Personal Hobby

  25. Intrinsic Extrinsic Personal Hobby Enjoy Learning

  26. Intrinsic Extrinsic Personal Hobby Enjoy Learning Fun / Culture

  27. Intrinsic Extrinsic Personal Hobby Enjoy Learning Fun / Culture Altruism

  28. Intrinsic Extrinsic Peer Recognition Personal Hobby Enjoy Learning Fun /

    Culture Altruism
  29. Intrinsic Extrinsic Peer Recognition Career Advancement Personal Hobby Enjoy Learning

    Fun / Culture Altruism
  30. Intrinsic Extrinsic Peer Recognition Career Advancement Self Marketing Personal Hobby

    Enjoy Learning Fun / Culture Altruism
  31. Intrinsic Extrinsic Peer Recognition Career Advancement Self Marketing Financial Rewards

    Personal Hobby Enjoy Learning Fun / Culture Altruism
  32. Contributor Maintainer https://opensource.guide/how-to-contribute/#anatomy-of-an-open-source-project

  33. Contributor Maintainer https://opensource.guide/how-to-contribute/#anatomy-of-an-open-source-project Contributed something back to the project •

    Bug Fixes • Build Features • Enhance Docs • Fix Typos
  34. Contributor Maintainer https://opensource.guide/how-to-contribute/#anatomy-of-an-open-source-project Contributed something back to the project •

    Bug Fixes • Build Features • Enhance Docs • Fix Typos Responsible for driving the vision and managing the organizational aspects of the project. • Bug Triage • PR Review • Directing Project
  35. Maintainer

  36. None
  37. None
  38. None
  39. None
  40. !40

  41. TF ≤ 2 65% of OSS repositories (A Novel Approach

    for Estimating Truck Factors, April 2016) !41
  42. None
  43. None
  44. @jlukic

  45. None
  46. None
  47. None
  48. !48 Is open source really free?

  49. None
  50. TIME : (

  51. TIME : ( BURNOUT

  52. None
  53. None
  54. None
  55. None
  56. On June 19th, 2017, one hundred people gathered in San

    Francisco to create a cultural shift in how we think about the sustainability of open source software.
  57. “Key pieces of OSS, of which many applications depend on,

    are often supported by small groups of individual contributors with no financial support or contractual obligation to do so …
  58. … This has created a landscape in which the goodwill

    of a few can no longer sustain the increasing demands the ecosystem places on them.“
  59. "Use money as an incentive for open source"

  60. #FUNDL

  61. How do I #FUNDL my projects?

  62. None
  63. DONATIONS SUPPORT LICENSE / USAGE

  64. Advertising DONATIONS SUPPORT LICENSE / USAGE Donation Buttons Sponsorships Grants

    Foundations Venture Capital Open Core SaaS Books Paid Training Merchandise Consulting Crowd Funding Bounties Restricted License Copyleft
  65. DONATIONS Donation Buttons Sponsorships Grants Foundations Ask for money from

    others to support the project.
  66. DONATIONS Donation Buttons Sponsorships Grants Foundations Ask for money from

    others to support the project. Low barrier of entry
  67. DONATIONS Donation Buttons Sponsorships Grants Foundations Ask for money from

    others to support the project. Low barrier of entry Allows developer to focus on code
  68. DONATIONS Donation Buttons Sponsorships Grants Foundations Ask for money from

    others to support the project. Low barrier of entry Allows developer to focus on code Little to no payout without fund-raising efforts
  69. DONATIONS Donation Buttons Sponsorships Grants Foundations Ask for money from

    others to support the project. Low barrier of entry Allows developer to focus on code Little to no payout without fund-raising efforts May need a large audience
  70. DONATIONS Donation Buttons Sponsorships Grants Foundations Ask for money from

    others to support the project. Ethereum Foundation Grants
  71. DONATIONS Donation Buttons Sponsorships Grants Foundations Ask for money from

    others to support the project. Potential Funding ($) Time away from code
  72. SUPPORT Sell time, training material and merchandise Merchandise Paid Training

    Books Consulting
  73. SUPPORT Sell time, training material and merchandise Good for marketing

    Merchandise Paid Training Books Consulting
  74. SUPPORT Sell time, training material and merchandise Good for marketing

    Helps keep project aligned with needs Merchandise Paid Training Books Consulting
  75. SUPPORT Sell time, training material and merchandise Good for marketing

    Helps keep project aligned with needs Smaller OSS projects don’t benefit Merchandise Paid Training Books Consulting
  76. SUPPORT Sell time, training material and merchandise Good for marketing

    Helps keep project aligned with needs Smaller OSS projects don’t benefit Paid training is rarely in demand Merchandise Paid Training Books Consulting
  77. SUPPORT Sell time, training material and merchandise Good for marketing

    Helps keep project aligned with needs Smaller OSS projects don’t benefit Paid training is rarely in demand Can distract from core development Merchandise Paid Training Books Consulting
  78. None
  79. None
  80. None
  81. None
  82. SUPPORT Sell time, training material and merchandise Merchandise Paid Training

    Books Consulting Potential Funding ($) Time away from code
  83. LICENSE / USAGE Sell licenses, features, or paid hosting Open

    Core Copyleft Venture Capital SaaS Restricted License
  84. LICENSE / USAGE Sell licenses, features, or paid hosting Open

    Core Copyleft Venture Capital SaaS Restricted License Can scale well if successful
  85. LICENSE / USAGE Sell licenses, features, or paid hosting Open

    Core Copyleft Venture Capital SaaS Restricted License Can scale well if successful Has potential to provide full-time income
  86. LICENSE / USAGE Sell licenses, features, or paid hosting Open

    Core Copyleft Venture Capital SaaS Restricted License Can scale well if successful Has potential to provide full-time income Smaller OSS projects don’t benefit
  87. LICENSE / USAGE Sell licenses, features, or paid hosting Open

    Core Copyleft Venture Capital SaaS Restricted License Can scale well if successful Has potential to provide full-time income Smaller OSS projects don’t benefit Can distract from core development
  88. LICENSE / USAGE Sell licenses, features, or paid hosting Open

    Core Copyleft Venture Capital SaaS Restricted License Can scale well if successful Has potential to provide full-time income Smaller OSS projects don’t benefit Can distract from core development Requires entrepreneur mindset
  89. LICENSE / USAGE Sell licenses, features, or paid hosting Open

    Core Copyleft Venture Capital SaaS Restricted License Potential Funding ($) Time away from code
  90. Advertising Crowd
 Funding Bounties

  91. CROWD FUNDING Ask for one-time or recurring donations

  92. CROWD FUNDING Ask for one-time or recurring donations Few strings

    attached
  93. CROWD FUNDING Ask for one-time or recurring donations Few strings

    attached Can be very easy to manage
 (Patreon, Liberapay, Open Collective, Flattr, etc)
  94. CROWD FUNDING Ask for one-time or recurring donations Few strings

    attached Can be very easy to manage
 (Patreon, Liberapay, Open Collective, Flattr, etc) Hard to get commitments to recurring donations
  95. CROWD FUNDING Ask for one-time or recurring donations Few strings

    attached Can be very easy to manage
 (Patreon, Liberapay, Open Collective, Flattr, etc) Hard to get commitments to recurring donations Usually not very much money ($1-4K/mo)
  96. CROWD FUNDING Ask for one-time or recurring donations Few strings

    attached Can be very easy to manage
 (Patreon, Liberapay, Open Collective, Flattr, etc) Hard to get commitments to recurring donations Usually not very much money ($1-4K/mo) May need a large audience
  97. CROWD FUNDING Ask for one-time or recurring donations Few strings

    attached Can be very easy to manage
 (Patreon, Liberapay, Open Collective, Flattr, etc) Hard to get commitments to recurring donations Usually not very much money ($1-4K/mo) May need a large audience
  98. CROWD FUNDING Ask for one-time or recurring donations

  99. CROWD FUNDING Ask for one-time or recurring donations Potential Funding

    ($) Time away from code
  100. BOUNTIES Earn money for contributing to open source

  101. BOUNTIES Earn money for contributing to open source Anyone can

    participate
  102. BOUNTIES Earn money for contributing to open source Anyone can

    participate Money is tied to doing specific work
  103. BOUNTIES Earn money for contributing to open source Anyone can

    participate Money is tied to doing specific work Can often lead to job placement
  104. BOUNTIES Earn money for contributing to open source Anyone can

    participate Money is tied to doing specific work Usually doesn't pay much per bounty (<$500) Can often lead to job placement
  105. BOUNTIES Earn money for contributing to open source Anyone can

    participate Money is tied to doing specific work Usually doesn't pay much per bounty (<$500) Does not provide recurring revenue Can often lead to job placement
  106. BOUNTIES Earn money for contributing to open source Anyone can

    participate Money is tied to doing specific work Usually doesn't pay much per bounty (<$500) Does not provide recurring revenue Can often lead to job placement May require specialized skills in security
  107. BOUNTIES Earn money for contributing to open source !107

  108. BOUNTIES Earn money for contributing to open source !108 Potential

    Funding ($) Time away from code
  109. ADVERTISING Display ads on your website

  110. ADVERTISING Passive income (set it and forget it) Display ads

    on your website
  111. ADVERTISING Passive income (set it and forget it) Recurring, reliable

    income Display ads on your website
  112. ADVERTISING Passive income (set it and forget it) Recurring, reliable

    income Requires a large enough audience to justify ads Display ads on your website
  113. ADVERTISING Passive income (set it and forget it) Recurring, reliable

    income Requires a large enough audience to justify ads Potential to lose trust with user base Display ads on your website
  114. ADVERTISING Passive income (set it and forget it) Recurring, reliable

    income Requires a large enough audience to justify ads Potential to lose trust with user base Potential ethical concerns about marketing Display ads on your website
  115. ADVERTISING Passive income (set it and forget it) Recurring, reliable

    income Requires a large enough audience to justify ads Potential to lose trust with user base Potential ethical concerns about marketing Possibly introduce conflict of interest Display ads on your website
  116. ADVERTISING Display ads on your website

  117. ADVERTISING Potential Funding ($) Time away from code Display ads

    on your website
  118. None
  119. None
  120. None
  121. Thank You! @coderberry eric@codefund.io medium.com/codefund github.com/coderberry