Vague But Exciting (v3)

0988796fb50136535a69cea314396cfa?s=47 Dave Rupert
November 14, 2017

Vague But Exciting (v3)

A continuation of my talk on prototyping. Looking to industries outside web and app development for inspiration on how to build digital products.

This version of the talk was originally given at Beyond Tellerand. A video is available here: https://beyondtellerrand.com/events/berlin-2017/speakers/dave-rupert

It was also reprised and slightly extended at Refresh Austin the next week.

0988796fb50136535a69cea314396cfa?s=128

Dave Rupert

November 14, 2017
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Transcript

  1. VAGUE BUT EXCITING Dave Rupert @davatron5000

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  3. HOW THE F#$% DID THEY MAKE THIS?

  4. HOW DO LARGE CREATIVE PROJECTS SUCCEED?

  5. WHY DO LARGE CREATIVE PROJECTS FAIL?

  6. SPOILER ALERT: THE ANSWER IS PROTOTYPES

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  9. Making a Movie Plan Edit Capture

  10. Making an Animated Film Animate Plan

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  14. Introducing a revolutionary new Design Thinking Thought Technology…

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  16. Think through problems before getting to the expensive part.

  17. Find (or make) technology that allows you to prototype quickly.

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  21. A combination of cobbled together parts. But it was instantly

    fun. And that's how we knew... – Jeff Kaplan, Game Director of Overwatch
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  24. Quickly create Minimum Viable Products.

  25. Quickly create Minimum Viable Products.

  26. “Find out if it’s a dumb idea as soon as

    possible.” - Dave Rupert, Startup Guru
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  30. There was a room made of simple Lego-like blocks, and

    Mario and Luigi could run around in there, climb slopes, jump around, etc. We were trying to get the controls right with an analogue 3D stick, and once that felt smooth, we knew we were halfway there. As for the courses and enemies, those actually came at the very end. They were done in a single burst of energy, just thrown together, almost.
  31. We get the fundamentals solid first, then do as much

    with that core concept as our time and ambition will allow. – Shigeru Miyamoto
  32. 「手応え」 Hand Response or “Game Feel”

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  36. The way that Miyamoto-san [makes] games, the idea comes not

    from the design, but from the function. The design comes after. – Satoru Iwata
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  38. Prove ideas before committing to them.

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  44. 60 PROTOTYPES IN 30 WEEKS

  45. MON TUE WED THU FRI

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  48. “80% IS BETTER THAN 90%”

  49. You build the tip of the iceberg and people will

    come to you and describe the rest. – Manuel Clément, Google
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  51. Bring people in to test.

  52. A short timeframe forces quick thinking.

  53. Less polished gets better feedback.

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  59. That experiment showed us how great the title could be,

    but also the amount of work required to make it. – Hidemaro Fujibayashi
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  61. Build a prototype to validate ideas.

  62. Experiment to get better estimates of the work required.

  63. NO DATABASE!!

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  69. “Prescribe to an iterative development process, and use prototypes as

    a method of proving features and concepts before committing them to your design.”
  70. VALUE PROTOTYPES

  71. PROTOTYPES ARE FOR EVERYONE

  72. THANKS! Dave Rupert @davatron5000 Illustration by Kyle Ferrin @d20plusmodifier