Public Speaking For Engineers

Public Speaking For Engineers

Have you ever wanted to deliver a session or keynote at your favorite conference? Have you ever attended a really boring session and thought, "I could do better than that!" Are you terrified of getting in front of your peers? Have you ever wondered how to effectively use humor to get your point across? In this course, you will learn how to excel at public speaking, technical sessions, Q&A, and stand-up comedy. We'll cover how to make the perfect deck, submitting abstracts, using humor, and how to build your personal confidence. You will laugh, you will grow, and you will leave inspired.

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Robby Millsap

January 10, 2020
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Transcript

  1. Public Speaking for Engineers Robby “Sap” Millsap IAmSap.com

  2. Welcome

  3. What is your greatest passion?

  4. Exercise

  5. Icebreakers šChange the energy of room šBreak the speaker/audience wall

  6. Our roadmap šHow to speak šWhere to speak šWhat you

    should say Signposting
  7. Interactive session Survey Popcorn

  8. Our roadmap šHow to speak šWhere to speak šWhat you

    should say
  9. Giving a speech is no different than making a cheese

    sandwich. Principle #1
  10. Just do it

  11. Unlearn what we learned in cartoons • Head back •

    Shoulders up • Full body
  12. Breathe like a baby • Fill bag with air •

    Exhale the bag contracts
  13. Breathe from your diaphragm You can practice this at home

    by lying flat on your back.
  14. You have two voices šConversational voice šSpeaking voice

  15. Improving speaking voice šLouder than conversational voice šSlower than conversational

    voice šMore emphatic
  16. How to improve your voice šRecord yourself šTake singing lessons

  17. This guy! I took vocal lessons from a guy I

    met on Craigslist! Come on in! I promise not to murder you.
  18. Where to look?

  19. Two schools of thought Just above everyone’s heads One person,

    one point
  20. Two schools of thought Just above everyone’s heads One person,

    one point 1 2 3 4
  21. Where not to look šFloor šCeiling šExits šWatch šBoss šSlides

  22. Building compelling decks

  23. Three kinds of talks šInformative šPersuasive šEntertaining

  24. Decks vs. Visual aids (slides) Decks (Informative) šContent stands on

    its own šCan be shared šGood for informative šData heavy šMay stop listening Visual aids (Persuasive, Entertaining) šVery few slides (10 or less) šBullets and imagery šNot shareable š“You had to be there”
  25. Decks vs. Visual aids (slides) Decks (Informative) šContent stands on

    its own šCan be shared šGood for informative šData heavy šMay stop listening Visual aids (Persuasive, Entertaining) šVery few slides (10 or less) šBullets and imagery šNot shareable š“You had to be there”
  26. What font size should I use?

  27. Guy Kawasaki rule “Take the age of the oldest person

    in the room and divide in half.”
  28. Too much noise š Microsoft is an American multinational corporation

    š Headquartered in Redmond, WA š Manufactures and sells computer software š World’s largest software maker by revenue š Founded by Bill Gates and Paul Allen in 1975 š Launch their IPO in 1986 š Azure is their cloud platform š Visual Studio is a popular IDE š Steve Ballmer replaced gates in 2000 š Being is their search engine, but you probably don’t use it. š MS-DOS helped solidify the company's dominance References š https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft š https://www.biography.com/business-figure/bill-gates š https://slate.com/technology/2012/10/microsoft- zune-how-one-of-the-biggest-flops-in-tech-history- helped-revive-a-great-american-tech-company.html
  29. None
  30. Lecterns, podiums & pulpits

  31. Live coding (bad)

  32. None
  33. Live coding (better)

  34. None
  35. Remove distractions šFancy lasers, pointers šLoud/ironic/hilarious(!) attire šPlug-ins, extensions

  36. Filler šSo-called “crutch words” (uh, um) šLike, sort of

  37. Lazy descriptors šTry not to describe something as “cool”, “awesome

    sauce”, “sweet” or ”totally rad”
  38. None
  39. Humor šIndicator of intelligence and likeability šMaking people laugh is

    fun šComedy is an ingredient, not the base
  40. Getting laughs šDon’t be self-deprecating šLearn what makes people laugh

  41. Take a comedy class

  42. Story theme ideas (be specific) šDisaster stories (server crashes, malware,

    DDoS et al. ) šGood intentions gone wrong šBoss/client learns the hard way šA dormant bug in the code (w/snippets) šDeath marches, war stories
  43. Play with your pitch and pattern

  44. Use your hands

  45. Co-speaking

  46. Speaking on a panel šTell a story from your experience

  47. Our roadmap šHow to speak šWhere to speak šWhat you

    should say
  48. Live speaking opportunities šUser groups šToastmasters šOpen mics šOpen spaces

  49. Teaching šYouTube šPodcast šLinkedIn, others

  50. Conferences šCompetitive šCall for speakers šDon’t get blacklisted šPositive reviews

    get invited back
  51. Product demos šNever count on wifi šBring your own cables

    šLive demo, local demo, slides šShould be able to do presentation without projector if you have to
  52. Our roadmap šHow to speak šWhere to speak šWhat you

    should say
  53. Be authentic šBe truly yourself, not a character šSpeak from

    experience
  54. Be (a little) controversial

  55. In conclusion šHow to speak – Be prepared šWhere to

    speak – Be ready šWhat you should say – Be authentic