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You should contribute to open-source

You should contribute to open-source

From PyCon.sk 2017

Michal Petrucha

March 11, 2017
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  1. You should contribute to
    open-source
    Michal Petrucha
    PyCon.sk
    2017
    1 / 16

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  2. Who am I?
    koniiiik (freenode, twitter, .org, . . . )
    [email protected]
    occasional OSS contributor
    2 / 16

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  3. What is this talk about?
    people who have never contributed to OSS
    people who are familiar with software
    development
    reasons why you should get involved
    how you get started
    3 / 16

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  4. What is open-source software
    software whose source code
    is publicly available under an
    open-source license
    corporate open-source vs.
    open development
    4 / 16

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  5. Personal reasons to get involved
    give back to the community
    get fame and recognition
    get more experience, learn from others
    it’s enjoyable
    5 / 16

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  6. Professional reasons to get involved
    you’re probably already leveraging a lot of
    OSS
    OSS is a part of your product
    it’s your job to make your product better
    if an issue affects you, it’s your job to fix it
    6 / 16

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  7. Ways to contribute
    code
    documentation
    code review
    bug triage
    translations
    help out in support channels (mailing lists,
    IRC, . . . )
    7 / 16

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  8. So you found a bug (1)
    diagnose, find out what’s going on
    track it down to a bug in a library
    develop a workaround
    \o/ problem solved, move on!
    . . . or not.
    8 / 16

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  9. So you found a bug (1)
    diagnose, find out what’s going on
    track it down to a bug in a library
    develop a workaround
    \o/ problem solved, move on!
    . . . or not.
    9 / 16

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  10. So you found a bug (1)
    diagnose, find out what’s going on
    track it down to a bug in a library
    develop a workaround
    \o/ problem solved, move on!
    . . . or not.
    10 / 16

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  11. So you found a bug (2)
    you might be the person who knows the
    most about it
    you might encounter the bug again
    at least report the bug
    maybe describe your workaround
    better – provide a test case
    best – fix it, and submit a patch
    11 / 16

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  12. If you don’t know where to start
    Django has the “easy pickings”
    some projects offer mentoring
    sometimes there’s a roadmap
    Summer of Code programs
    hang out on IRC, mailing lists, try to help
    others
    Don’t be shy! Nobody is perfect.
    12 / 16

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  13. What to do
    read the contribution guidelines
    follow the process for contributions, code
    style
    if anything is unclear, don’t be afraid to ask
    search the bug tracker before reporting a
    bug
    say “thanks”
    13 / 16

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  14. What not to do
    14 / 16

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  15. Don’t hesitate,
    just do it.
    github.com/pkafei/
    OpenSource_Contributor_Guide
    dont-be-afraid-to-commit.rtfd.org
    16 / 16

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