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Developing a Plan for Digital Literacy

3b0d781c8d60e579f9d4d531bd2044cd?s=47 Tracy Parish
October 25, 2012

Developing a Plan for Digital Literacy

In a world where there is an estimated 5 trillion megabytes of data on the internet, it is important as elearning professionals to know how to traverse this ever-expanding information. We may each think we are digitally literate, but are we truly at the level we need to be? What about our learners and our employees? Have we considered yet how to help and ensure our learners and/or employee are just as confident in using the internet to explore and extract the information they are seeking? This course will help participants to understand what digital literacy is and what is required to be capable and proficient in seeking, surfing, analyzing and creating data on the internet.

3b0d781c8d60e579f9d4d531bd2044cd?s=128

Tracy Parish

October 25, 2012
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  1. DEVELOPING DIGITAL LITERACY TRACYPARISH.CA @TRACY_PARISH

  2. Tracy Parish Education Technology Specialist Southlake Regional Health Centre Newmarket,

    Ontario  @tracy_parish  http://tracyparish.ca
  3. What Who Where How

  4. How to get them up to speed? Where did this

    begin for me?
  5. Where did this begin for me?  Emerging technologies /practice

     Impacting teaching, learning, & creative inquiry  On the horizon  1 year or less  2 to 3 years  4 to 5 years www.nmc.org/pdf/2011-Horizon-Reprot.pdf
  6. What struck me? “Digital media literacy continues its rise in

    importance as a key skill in every discipline and profession. This challenge, first noted in 2008, reflects universal agreement among those on the Horizon Project Advisory Board. Although there is broad consensus that digital media literacy is vitally important for today’s students, what skills constitute digital literacy are still not well-defined nor universally taught. Teacher preparation programs are beginning to include courses related to digital media literacy, and universities are beginning to fold these literacy skills into coursework for students, but progress continues to be slow. The challenge is exacerbated by the fact that digital technologies morph and change quickly at a rate that generally outpaces curriculum development.” Johnson, L., Smith, R., Willis, H., Levine, A., and Haywood, K., (2011). The 2011 Horizon Report. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium (p.3-4)
  7. What struck me? “Digital media literacy continues its rise in

    importance as a key skill in every discipline and profession. This challenge, first noted in 2008, reflects universal agreement among those on the Horizon Project Advisory Board. Although there is broad consensus that digital media literacy is vitally important for today’s students, what skills constitute digital literacy are still not well-defined nor universally taught. Teacher preparation programs are beginning to include courses related to digital media literacy, and universities are beginning to fold these literacy skills into coursework for students, but progress continues to be slow. The challenge is exacerbated by the fact that digital technologies morph and change quickly at a rate that generally outpaces curriculum development.” Johnson, L., Smith, R., Willis, H., Levine, A., and Haywood, K., (2011). The 2011 Horizon Report. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium (p.3-4) Johnson, L., Smith, R., Willis, H., Levine, A., and Haywood, K., (2011). The 2011 Horizon Report. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium (p.3-4)
  8. What struck me? “Digital media literacy continues its rise in

    importance as a key skill in every discipline and profession. This challenge, first noted in 2008, reflects universal agreement among those on the Horizon Project Advisory Board. Although there is broad consensus that digital media literacy is vitally important for today’s students, what skills constitute digital literacy are still not well-defined nor universally taught. Teacher preparation programs are beginning to include courses related to digital media literacy, and universities are beginning to fold these literacy skills into coursework for students, but progress continues to be slow. The challenge is exacerbated by the fact that digital technologies morph and change quickly at a rate that generally outpaces curriculum development.” Johnson, L., Smith, R., Willis, H., Levine, A., and Haywood, K., (2011). The 2011 Horizon Report. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium (p.3-4) Johnson, L., Smith, R., Willis, H., Levine, A., and Haywood, K., (2011). The 2011 Horizon Report. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium (p.3-4)
  9. What struck me? “Digital media literacy continues its rise in

    importance as a key skill in every discipline and profession. This challenge, first noted in 2008, reflects universal agreement among those on the Horizon Project Advisory Board. Although there is broad consensus that digital media literacy is vitally important for today’s students, what skills constitute digital literacy are still not well-defined nor universally taught. Teacher preparation programs are beginning to include courses related to digital media literacy, and universities are beginning to fold these literacy skills into coursework for students, but progress continues to be slow. The challenge is exacerbated by the fact that digital technologies morph and change quickly at a rate that generally outpaces curriculum development.” Johnson, L., Smith, R., Willis, H., Levine, A., and Haywood, K., (2011). The 2011 Horizon Report. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium (p.3-4) Johnson, L., Smith, R., Willis, H., Levine, A., and Haywood, K., (2011). The 2011 Horizon Report. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium (p.3-4)
  10. What struck me? “Digital media literacy continues its rise in

    importance as a key skill in every discipline and profession. This challenge, first noted in 2008, reflects universal agreement among those on the Horizon Project Advisory Board. Although there is broad consensus that digital media literacy is vitally important for today’s students, what skills constitute digital literacy are still not well-defined nor universally taught. Teacher preparation programs are beginning to include courses related to digital media literacy, and universities are beginning to fold these literacy skills into coursework for students, but progress continues to be slow. The challenge is exacerbated by the fact that digital technologies morph and change quickly at a rate that generally outpaces curriculum development.” Johnson, L., Smith, R., Willis, H., Levine, A., and Haywood, K., (2011). The 2011 Horizon Report. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium (p.3-4)
  11. How do you view new tools?

  12. When a new online tool or app comes out that

    is all the buzz how are you most likely to react to it? 1. I have enough already that meet my needs. 2. I at least have a look at it. 3. I test it out - and drop it when friends drop it. 4. I test it out - only dropping it if it does nothing for me. 5. I become the Jedi master of it and share it with everyone...I collect tools/apps.
  13. How do you view new tools? Observers and Uncommitals Testers

    and Keepers of “useful apps” Masters and Collectors of tools and apps
  14. How do you view new tools?

  15. So if it’s so important what is it? Photo by:

    Jonny Wikins http://www.flickr.com/photos/photojonny/2268845904/ CC: BY-NC-SA
  16. History Photo by: Paul Townsend http://www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/4933754453/ CC: BY-SA Photo by:

    cod_gabriel http://www.flickr.com/photos/cod_gabriel/2766913805/ CC: BY Photo by: Nathan Rupert http://www.flickr.com/photos/nathaninsandiego/3976667480/ CC: BY-NC-ND
  17. Photo by: Abel Cheung http://www.flickr.com/photos/abelcheung/3410819084/ CC: BY-SA

  18. “Using digital technology, communications tools, and/or networks to access, manage,

    integrate, evaluate, and create information in order to function in a knowledge society.” (EST ICT Literacy Panel, 2002, p.2)
  19. None
  20. Digital Literacy • Starts the conversation • 11 attempts to

    define “mastering ideas, not keystrokes” (Gislter, 1997, p.15)
  21. This left me with… … “Digital media literacy continues its

    rise in importance as a key skill in every discipline and profession. This challenge, first noted in 2008, reflects universal agreement among those on the Horizon Project Advisory Board. Although there is broad consensus that digital media literacy is vitally important for today’s students, what skills constitute digital literacy are still not well-defined nor universally taught. Teacher preparation programs are beginning to include courses related to digital media literacy, and universities are beginning to fold these literacy skills into coursework for students, but progress continues to be slow. The challenge is exacerbated by the fact that digital technologies morph and change quickly at a rate that generally outpaces curriculum development.” Johnson, L., Smith, R., Willis, H., Levine, A., and Haywood, K., (2011). The 2011 Horizon Report. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium (p.3-4) Johnson, L., Smith, R., Willis, H., Levine, A., and Haywood, K., (2011). The 2011 Horizon Report. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium (p.3-4)
  22. Simple Definition “Digital literacy is the ability to locate, organize,

    understand, evaluate, and create information using digital technology.” – C. Vincent Vincent, Claire. "Reframing Digital Literacy « Standard X-change." Standard X-change. Web. 23 Oct. 2011. <http://xdmo.wordpress.com/2011/10/17/reframing-digital-literacy/>.
  23. Digitally Literate Society “Knows how to leverage information technology to

    apply knowledge, share knowledge, and attain goals and objectives.” – C. Vincent Vincent, Claire. "Reframing Digital Literacy « Standard X-change." Standard X-change. Web. 23 Oct. 2011. <http://xdmo.wordpress.com/2011/10/17/reframing-digital-literacy/>.
  24. play Vartabedian, Vanessa. "New Media Literacies." New Media Literacies. N.p.,

    n.d. Web. 23 Oct. 2011. <http://www.newmedialiteracies.org/the-literacies.php>. What skills are needed? – New Media Literacies
  25. “Just try. Be adventurous.”

  26. play performance Vartabedian, Vanessa. "New Media Literacies." New Media Literacies.

    N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Oct. 2011. <http://www.newmedialiteracies.org/the-literacies.php>. What skills are needed? – New Media Literacies
  27. None
  28. play performance simulation Vartabedian, Vanessa. "New Media Literacies." New Media

    Literacies. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Oct. 2011. <http://www.newmedialiteracies.org/the-literacies.php>. What skills are needed? – New Media Literacies
  29. None
  30. play performance simulation appropriation Vartabedian, Vanessa. "New Media Literacies." New

    Media Literacies. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Oct. 2011. <http://www.newmedialiteracies.org/the-literacies.php>. What skills are needed? – New Media Literacies
  31. None
  32. play performance simulation appropriation multitasking distributed cognition Vartabedian, Vanessa. "New

    Media Literacies." New Media Literacies. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Oct. 2011. <http://www.newmedialiteracies.org/the-literacies.php>. What skills are needed? – New Media Literacies
  33. None
  34. play performance simulation appropriation multitasking distributed cognition collective intelligence Vartabedian,

    Vanessa. "New Media Literacies." New Media Literacies. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Oct. 2011. <http://www.newmedialiteracies.org/the-literacies.php>. What skills are needed? – New Media Literacies
  35. None
  36. play performance simulation appropriation multitasking distributed cognition collective intelligence judgement

    Vartabedian, Vanessa. "New Media Literacies." New Media Literacies. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Oct. 2011. <http://www.newmedialiteracies.org/the-literacies.php>. What skills are needed? – New Media Literacies
  37. None
  38. What skills are needed? – New Media Literacies play performance

    simulation appropriation multitasking distributed cognition collective intelligence judgement transmedia navigation networking Vartabedian, Vanessa. "New Media Literacies." New Media Literacies. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Oct. 2011. <http://www.newmedialiteracies.org/the-literacies.php>.
  39. None
  40. What skills are needed? – New Media Literacies play performance

    simulation appropriation multitasking distributed cognition collective intelligence judgement transmedia navigation networking negotiation visualization Vartabedian, Vanessa. "New Media Literacies." New Media Literacies. N.p., n.d. Web. 23 Oct. 2011. <http://www.newmedialiteracies.org/the-literacies.php>.
  41. Savino, Lindsey. "School Food vs Prison Food [infographic]." Daily Infographic.

    N.p., 8 June 2011. Web. 23 Oct. 2011. <dailyinfographic.com/school-food-vs-prison-food-infographic>.
  42. Improving Digital Literacy

  43. Who’s Doing What & Resources

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  48. Daniel Kent

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  65. Prezi - 4500

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  70. SlideShare- 27,877

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  74. 12 Million people 41 languages 148 countries 24,000 test centers

  75. None
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  81. Ideas and Resources  Mount Vernon Schools – Digital Literacy

    Workshop
  82. None
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  86. What are your thoughts? What challenges will we face?

  87. No fear. Just play. Just explore.

  88. Ongoing Resources

  89. Tool & Resource Links Everything seen here and more 

    http://evernote.com/pub/hamtra/digitalliteracy
  90. Tracy Parish Education Technology Specialist Southlake Regional Health Centre Newmarket,

    Ontario  @tracy_parish  http://tracyparish.ca  >FREEBIES>RESOURCES