Expressive Design Systems

Expressive Design Systems

Good design systems can help you create digital products with efficiency and consistency. But great design systems will support and strengthen your team’s creativity at the same time. In this talk, Yesenia will discuss how to communicate your brand ethos through a design system and how to collaborate across teams to create harmonious, branded experiences.

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Yesenia Perez-Cruz

October 17, 2019
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Transcript

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    What they say: “This is the best I could do,

    given the constraints of the system.”
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    Purpose-built: Help commuters find their way Range of expression: Station

    flashcards Inspires use: Guidelines, not rules
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    Shared foundation Room for 
 variation + Experience principles Station

    flashcards Time periods Materials Neighborhoods
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    We don’t always know how these pieces are going to

    be put together, but we do want the pieces to fit.
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    First, the design prioritizes legibility and conveying information as clearly

    as possible. “ —Mark Wilson, Fast Company Starbucks just publicly deconstructed its brand—here’s why
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    The other half is about expressivity, emotion, and all the

    other intangibles Starbucks wants to spark in the consumer. “ —Mark Wilson, Fast Company Starbucks just publicly deconstructed its brand—here’s why
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    Depending on the context, the brand system allows designers to

    dial up either trait as needed. “ —Mark Wilson, Fast Company Starbucks just publicly deconstructed its brand—here’s why
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    What contexts are your teams solving for? Environments: In store

    On-the-go Platforms: iOS Android Social Web Formats: Digital Physical products
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    Always design a thing by considering it in its next

    larger context—a chair in a room, a room in a house, a house in an environment, an environment in a city plan. —Eliel Saarinen “
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    I began to realize that if you made everything the

    same, it was boring after the first year. If you changed it individually for each play, the theater lost recognizability. “ —Paula Scher
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    Good Variation • If there’s a specific problem that we

    need a new pattern to solve • Determined by user scenarios and content needs • Strengthens brand voice in a way that serves our audience
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    Bad Variation • Visual variation on components that serve the

    same function across brands, • Don’t do much to strengthen brand voice
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    A cook knows what to do to create an enjoyable

    dish, then they use that knowledge and repeat what works to create a consistent experience. A chef not only knows what to do, but why it’s done. “ —Stephanie Poce
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    Shared foundation Room for 
 variation + High bedrest Generous

    seat Polished or powder-coated Leather or fabric
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    Shared foundation Room for 
 variation + High bedrest Generous

    seat Polished or powder-coated Leather or fabric Corporate Public Private
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    Patterns stay alive because the people who are using them

    are also testing them. “ —Christopher Alexander, A Pattern Language
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    Contribution • Why should you contribute? • How you should

    contribute? • Celebrate contributions
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    We want to tap into a designer’s inherent desire to

    evolve or even completely rethink parts of our system. “ —Josh Mateo and Brendon Manwaring
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    We want to create a paradigm shift wherein our designers

    no longer view themselves as users of the system, but instead see their role as core contributor and co-author of a shared system - one that they have ownership of. “ —Josh Mateo and Brendon Manwaring
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