People, Process, & Patterns

7559f6cff1f5efc2d210965febd4d71c?s=47 Bermon Painter
September 25, 2017

People, Process, & Patterns

Overview
Somewhere, a project is failing. More than likely the project isn’t failing because it’s difficult, or the budget ran out, or because there wasn’t a market fit. The project is failing because of people. People introduce communication problems, staffing problems, politics, disenchantment with the client or stakeholders, and often result in lack of motivation. It doesn’t matter what methodology you use to scope, design, and implement a project if you’re unable to deal with the underlying people issues because people are hard and people are what cause project failures.

Objective
In this session Bermon will discuss both the technical problems of project implementation and the sociological nature of the work we do and how to overcome them.

Five Things Audience Members Will Learn
1. What about people makes projects hard
2. How to overcome communication styles, engage in successful conflict, overcome politics, and set correct expectations
3. Tips and tricks to effectively negotiate conversations
4. Communication techniques needed to successfully build complex systems
5. How to successfully scope projects and reduce risk

7559f6cff1f5efc2d210965febd4d71c?s=128

Bermon Painter

September 25, 2017
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Transcript

  1. #WEBU17 | @bermonpainter PEOPLE, PROCESS, & PATTERNS

  2. PEOPLE, PROCESS, & PATTERNS What about people makes projects hard

    How to overcome communication styles & engage in successful conflict Tips and tricks to effectively negotiate conversations How to successfully scope projects and reduce risk Ways patterns can be a central talking point to build consensus 1 2 3 4 5 WEB UNLEASHED
  3. PEOPLE

  4. WHY ARE PEOPLE IRRATIONAL?

  5. “It is self-evident that people are neither fully rational nor

    completely selfish, and that their tastes are anything but stable.” - Daniel Kahneman
  6. None
  7. None
  8. ACTIVE LISTENING

  9. SLOW. IT. DOWN.

  10. TONE

  11. POSITIVE & PLAYFUL 1 SLOW & MEASURED 2 ASSERTIVE 3

  12. POSITIVE & PLAYFUL 1 SLOW & MEASURED 2 ASSERTIVE 3

  13. POSITIVE & PLAYFUL 1 SLOW & MEASURED 2 ASSERTIVE 3

  14. MIRRORING

  15. LABELING

  16. PARAPHRASING

  17. “The single biggest problem in communication is the allusion that

    is has taken place.” – George Bernard Shaw
  18. RESOURCES

  19. PROCESS

  20. None
  21. Product Backlog SPRINT Scoped User Stories Releasable Software Scoped User

    Stories Releasable Software Scoped User Stories Releasable Software Scoped User Stories Releasable Software Priority L H SPRINT SPRINT SPRINT TRADITIONAL AGILE PROCESS
  22. t APPEALING t FUNCTIONAL t VALUABLE DESIGN DEVELOPMENT USABILITY RESEARCH

    & VALIDATION USEFUL BUILDING GREAT PRODUCTS A great product decreases customer frustration, increases their productivity, lessens the need for training, provides consistent and predictable interactions, and increases user satisfaction and loyalty.
  23. t APPEALING t FUNCTIONAL t VALUABLE DESIGN DEVELOPMENT USABILITY RESEARCH

    & VALIDATION USEFUL BUILDING GREAT PRODUCTS A great product decreases customer frustration, increases their productivity, lessens the need for training, provides consistent and predictable interactions, and increases user satisfaction and loyalty.
  24. t APPEALING t FUNCTIONAL t VALUABLE DESIGN DEVELOPMENT USABILITY RESEARCH

    & VALIDATION USEFUL BUILDING GREAT PRODUCTS A great product decreases customer frustration, increases their productivity, lessens the need for training, provides consistent and predictable interactions, and increases user satisfaction and loyalty.
  25. t APPEALING t FUNCTIONAL t VALUABLE DESIGN DEVELOPMENT USABILITY RESEARCH

    & VALIDATION USEFUL BUILDING GREAT PRODUCTS A great product decreases customer frustration, increases their productivity, lessens the need for training, provides consistent and predictable interactions, and increases user satisfaction and loyalty.
  26. LIFECYCLE OF A REQUIREMENT REQUIREMENTS

  27. LIFECYCLE OF A REQUIREMENT ASSUMPTIONS

  28. LIFECYCLE OF A REQUIREMENT RISK

  29. LIFECYCLE OF A REQUIREMENT IDEAS

  30. LIFECYCLE OF A REQUIREMENT IDEAS IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA

    IDEA DELIVERY BACKLOG
  31. LIFECYCLE OF A REQUIREMENT DELIVERY BACKLOG IDEA IDEA IDEA IDEA

    IDEA IDEA IDEA
  32. LIFECYCLE OF A REQUIREMENT EA EA FRAME ASSUMPTIONS MAKE SENSE

    OF THE PROBLEMS BRAINSTORM SOLUTIONS DETERMINE FOCUS AREAS DISCOVERY CYCLE VALIDATION CYCLE LEARN BUILD 1 2 3 4 7 6 5 MEASURE IDEA
  33. LIFECYCLE OF A REQUIREMENT FRAME ASSUMPTIONS MAKE SENSE OF THE

    PROBLEMS BRAINSTORM SOLUTIONS DETERMINE FOCUS AREAS DISCOVERY CYCLE VALIDATION CYCLE LEARN BUILD 1 2 3 4 7 6 5 MEASURE VALIDATED IDEAS A
  34. LIFECYCLE OF A REQUIREMENT ME ON BRAINSTORM SOLUTIONS DETERMINE FOCUS

    AREAS DISCOVERY CYCLE VALIDATION CYCLE LEARN BUILD 1 3 4 7 6 5 MEASURE VALIDATED IDEAS DELIVERY BACKLOG
  35. LIFECYCLE OF A REQUIREMENT VALIDATED IDEAS DELIVERY BACKLOG SCOPED ITERATION

  36. LIFECYCLE OF A REQUIREMENT DELIVERY BACKLOG SCOPED ITERATION WORKING SOFTWARE

  37. DUAL TRACK DISCOVERY / DELIVERY DISCOVERY DELIVERY DISCOVERY CYCLE VALIDATION

    CYCLE DISCOVERY CYCLE VALIDATION CYCLE SPRINT SPRINT DISCOVERY CYCLE VALIDATION CYCLE IDEAS IDEAS IDEAS
  38. DUAL TRACK DISCOVERY / DELIVERY Discovery Backlog Priority L H

    FRAME ASSUMPTION MAKE SENSE OF THE PROBLEMS BRAINSTORM SOLUTIONS DETERMINE FOCUS DISCOVERY CYCLE VALIDATION CYCLE LEARN BUILD 1 2 3 4 7 6 5 MEASURE Discovery / Validation Cycle Validated Ideas
  39. Discovery Backlog Priority L H Kanban Validated Ideas Ready In

    Progress Review Done DUAL TRACK DISCOVERY / DELIVERY
  40. DUAL TRACK DISCOVERY / DELIVERY Delivery Backlog Priority L H

    Discovery / Validation Cycle Releasable Software SPRINT
  41. t APPEALING t FUNCTIONAL t VALUABLE DESIGN DEVELOPMENT USABILITY RESEARCH

    & VALIDATION USEFUL CHANGING THE DEFINITION OF DONE A great product decreases customer frustration, increases their productivity, lessens the need for training, provides consistent and predictable interactions, and increases user satisfaction and loyalty.
  42. RESOURCES

  43. PATTERNS

  44. WHAT IS A PATTERN LIBRARY? A collection of user interface

    design patterns that appear multiple times across a website or application. The pattern library documents each patterns and defines: 1. what they look like 2. how they behave 3. how to code them
  45. WHAT IS A PATTERN LIBRARY? CORE COMPONENTS PATTERNS TEMPLATES PAGES

  46. WHAT IS A PATTERN LIBRARY? CORE COMPONENTS PATTERNS TEMPLATES PAGES

    Aa Transport New Medium ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 0123456789 Grid Baseline
  47. WHAT IS A PATTERN LIBRARY? CORE COMPONENTS PATTERNS TEMPLATES PAGES

  48. WHAT IS A PATTERN LIBRARY? CORE COMPONENTS PATTERNS TEMPLATES PAGES

  49. WHAT IS A PATTERN LIBRARY? CORE COMPONENTS PATTERNS TEMPLATES PAGES

  50. WHAT IS A PATTERN LIBRARY? CORE COMPONENTS PATTERNS TEMPLATES PAGES

  51. WHY ARE PATTERN LIBRARIES USEFUL? CONSISTENCY Large projects are developed

    by different people over a long period of time which leads to fragmentation. A pattern library provides central documentation for all patterns across multiple projects or teams and make it easy to quickly duplicate existing patterns when creating a new page. 1 REUSABILITY Large teams typically work in isolation and reinvent the wheel at a considerable cost. A pattern library, developed in collaboration between relevant teams, make sure patterns can be reused. When a new pattern is created, it is permanently available for the whole team to use on current and future projects. 2 MAINTAINABILITY Inconsistencies and reinventing the wheel decrease maintainability. In a pattern library each pattern is tested across multiple browsers and complies with existing brand standards. This reduces the number of bugs reported, and allows the teams to focus on creating new features. 3
  52. WHO ARE THE DECISION MAKERS? MARKETING Typically an easier conversation.

    They tend to focus a lot on brand consistency and customer engagement / satisfaction. 1 IT / DEVELOPMENT They tend care about implementation details, how to reduce development costs, improve test coverage, and in some cases how to avoid writing front-end code. 2 FORWARD THINKING C-LEVEL (CMO, CTO, CIO) They may have attended a conference or latched on to some buzzwords & want to help their organization be more effective and increase time-to-market on new features. 3
  53. MATURITY MODEL INCONSISTENT The team has no pattern library and

    may be missing core capabilities to build one. Their output is inconsistent. STATIC They may have a designer that’s produced a static document to detail branding guidelines. MANUAL A pattern library exists and has some code, but it has to be manually updated and isn’t fully integrated with their development. AUTOMATIC A pattern library exists and is fully integrated in to the development build process. GOVERENED The pattern library is built into the core of how the organization builds applications and websites.
  54. SOLITARY CENTRALIZED FEDERATED MATURITY MODEL

  55. PROJECTS ARE EASY. PEOPLE ARE HARD.

  56. ACTIVELY LISTEN 1 CHOOSE YOUR TONE 2 MIRROR 3 LABEL

    4 PARAPHRASE 5
  57. RESOURCES NATHAN CURTIS https://medium.com/@nathanacurtis 1 https://www.smashingmagazine.com/design-systems-book/ 2 ALLA KHOLMATOVA

  58. FIN OPEN OFFICE HOURS Friday mornings: 7am-9am officehours.io/people/bermonpainter TWITTER/SKYPE/EMAIL @bermonpainter

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