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A Day in the Life of a UX Designer - Story Mapping Activity

F4a942838c45c7b2c2872e1953221526?s=47 exploreUX
April 13, 2016

A Day in the Life of a UX Designer - Story Mapping Activity

This month, we explored the role of a UX Designer!

Our guest speaker for this session is Emily Holmes, the Director of UX for R&D at Hobsons, Inc. Emily talked about her role as a UX Designer on an innovation team and walked us through a case study of a project she worked on using Lean UX methodology.

Here’s the slide deck for the accompanying story mapping activity that she led the group through. You can find a recap of the event on exploreUX.org or on the event’s meetup page.

About the A Day in the Life Series
Each month, we'll explore a different role in the UX field. This gives an opportunity for you to learn about what people do in that particular role, ask them questions, and participate in activity to “test drive” what it’s like to be in this role.

This event series is brought to you by exploreUX and Triangle UXPA. For more about this event or exploreUX in general, check out the exploreUX Raleigh Edition meetup page or exploreUX.org.

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exploreUX

April 13, 2016
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Transcript

  1. Jumpr Uber for roadside assistance

  2. Jumpr background background Where  the  idea  came  from

  3. Jumpr background Research • Market  research • User  research •

    Landing  page  or  other  tests
  4. Jumpr background Research Key  findings: • There’s  enough  interest  in

      the  idea  for  us  to  proceed   with  the  discovery  process
  5. Jumpr background Research Key  findings: • People  would  use  the

     service  for: 1. Flat  tire 2. Dead  battery 3. Getting  pulled  out  of  a  ditch  or  off  the  beach 4. Getting  towed  to  a  repair  shop  for  more   serious  problems 5. Other  situations
  6. Jumpr background personas Sue Age  65 Retired Has  a  AAA

     membership Why  would  she  use  Jumpr? She’s  generally  happy  with  AAA,  but  sometimes   she  goes  hiking  in  national  parks  or  areas   without  street  addresses.   She’s  had  a  few   experiences   where  AAA  wasn’t  able  to  assist  her.   She’s  always  been  able  to  find  a  passerby   to   help,  but  would  like  to  have  another  option   available.   We  would  make  her  happy  if: • She  knows  she  has  a  plan  B  when  needed • She  knows  the  people  helping  her  have  been   vetted  somehow,  so  she  doesn’t  have  to  flag   down  a  stranger  for  help
  7. Jumpr background personas Angela Age  18 College  student Parents  pay

     for  AAA Why  would  she  use  Jumpr? One  time  she  stayed  at  the  library  until  midnight   on  a  Friday,  and  came  out  to  her  car  only  to   discover  a  flat  tire.  Because   it  was  late  on  a   weekend  night,  AAA  was  busy  and  took  over  an   hour  to  get  to  her  location.  She  had  to  wait  in  a   dark  parking  lot  and  was  nervous  about  her   safety. We  would  make  her  happy  if: • She  has  an  alternative   to  AAA  that  can  arrive   quickly • She  knows  she  will  be  safe
  8. Jumpr background scenario Jeremy Age  22 Fast  food  worker No

     AAA Why  would  he  use  Jumpr? Jeremy’s  car  breaks  down  a  lot,  and  he  would   like  a  simple,  repeatable   way  to  get  help.  He   can’t  afford  a  AAA  membership   and  doesn’t   usually  plan  ahead.     We  would  make  him  happy  if: • Jumpr is  inexpensive,   simple  and  quick • There  are  no  hidden  or  recurring  costs
  9. Jumpr background SCENARIO Sue  drives  to  a  remote  area  for

     a  Saturday  afternoon   hike. When  she’s  done   hiking,  she  returns  to  her  car  to  head  home,  and  discovers  that  there’s  a  problem   with  her  car. Sue  calls  AAA  and  because  she’s  in  a  remote  location,  they  aren’t  sure  what   address  to  dispatch  a  tow  truck  driver  to.    She  is  transferred   between  multiple   departments   and  realizes  it’s  going  to  take  a  long  time  to  get  assistance.   She   wonders  if  there’s  a  better  way. Using  her  smartphone,   Sue  Googles  for  another  option  and  finds  Jumpr.  She     decides  to  give  it  a  try.  She  specifies   what  problem  she’s  having  and  can  see  that   there’s  someone   10  minutes  away  who  can  help  her.  She  indicates  that  she’d  like   someone  to  come  to  her  location,  and  sees  that  help  is  on  the  way.  The  Jumpr driver  arrives   and  resolves   her  problem.  Sue  pays  and  is  safely  on  her  way  home.
  10. Jumpr Story map Story mapping time!

  11. Jumpr Story map Decides  to   try  Jumpr Specifies  

    the  problem Sees  that  a   driver  is   nearby Driver   arrives;   problem  is   fixed Payment.   Transaction   complete
  12. Jumpr Story map Decides  to   try  Jumpr Specifies  

    the  problem Sees  that  a   driver  is   nearby Driver   arrives;   problem  is   fixed Payment.   Transaction   complete What  does   this  mean? What  does   payment   look  like? Does   anything   need  to   happen  to   confirm  this? What  does   Sue  really   need  to  see   or  know?   What’s  the   simplest   way  to  do   this?
  13. Jumpr Story map Decides  to   try  Jumpr Specifies  

    the  problem Sees  that  a   driver  is   nearby Driver   arrives;   problem  is   fixed Payment.   Transaction   complete Critical   feature Critical   feature Critical   feature Critical   feature Critical   feature Non-­‐critical   feature Non-­‐critical   feature Non-­‐critical   feature Non-­‐critical   feature Non-­‐critical   feature Question Question Question Question Question
  14. Jumpr conclusion Wrap up

  15. Jumpr conclusion