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NDGIS 2013 - How to Remain Relevant in the Age of Change or What GIS Pros Can Do to Keep their Skills in Demand

1e1293843b57cc564b268f36f729a771?s=47 James Fee
September 25, 2013

NDGIS 2013 - How to Remain Relevant in the Age of Change or What GIS Pros Can Do to Keep their Skills in Demand

1e1293843b57cc564b268f36f729a771?s=128

James Fee

September 25, 2013
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  1. How to Remain Relevant in the Age of Change James

    Fee Founder – Spatially Adjusted or What GIS Pros Can Do to Keep their Skills in Demand
  2. What is GIS?

  3. What is GIS? Who Cares?

  4. What are GIS Professionals?

  5. What are GIS Professionals? Programmers!

  6. Say
 Wut?

  7. Programmer 
 /= 
 Developer Photo by Joachim S. Müller

    - http://flic.kr/p/egrei2
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  10. James’ Definition of a GIS Professional Someone digitally creates and

    "manipulates" spatial areas that may be jurisdictional, purpose, or application-oriented.
  11. attribution: ESRI International User Conference - 2011 - San Diego,

    California by Kris Krüg http://flic.kr/p/a2rdhq CC BY-NC-SA 2.0
  12. Embrace the Tools of Programmers

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  14. GIS

  15. Esri in the 70’s

  16. ArcInfo

  17. ARC/INFO Required Prime Computer

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  25. ArcGIS Desktop

  26. ArcGIS Desktop

  27. ArcGIS Desktop

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  31. Why The History Lesson?

  32. Photo by dullhunk - http://flic.kr/p/zDLZm

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  34. A Simpler Time

  35. A Simpler Time

  36. 
 Problems with Wizards • Wizards cause us to conform

    • Options are either preset or confusing • Lack of documenting the process
  37. Familiarity is a Tough Nut to Crack Most GIS Professionals

    only know ArcToolbox
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  41. With the Command Line • Freedom to work with the

    data as you want • Better understanding of the commands • Combined with scripting you have a recipe for future work. AKA documentation!
  42. Programming GIS 1999-2004

  43. Programming GIS 1999-2004 • Start up ArcCatalog (wait 2-4 min

    while it loads)
  44. Programming GIS 1999-2004 • Start up ArcCatalog (wait 2-4 min

    while it loads) • Browse for toolbox (clicking through the endless tree)
  45. Programming GIS 1999-2004 • Start up ArcCatalog (wait 2-4 min

    while it loads) • Browse for toolbox (clicking through the endless tree) • Open tool dialog
  46. Programming GIS 1999-2004 • Start up ArcCatalog (wait 2-4 min

    while it loads) • Browse for toolbox (clicking through the endless tree) • Open tool dialog • Browse for input dataset
  47. Programming GIS 1999-2004 • Start up ArcCatalog (wait 2-4 min

    while it loads) • Browse for toolbox (clicking through the endless tree) • Open tool dialog • Browse for input dataset • Browse for any optional data for analysis
  48. Programming GIS 1999-2004 • Start up ArcCatalog (wait 2-4 min

    while it loads) • Browse for toolbox (clicking through the endless tree) • Open tool dialog • Browse for input dataset • Browse for any optional data for analysis • Browse for an output location
  49. Programming GIS 1999-2004 • Start up ArcCatalog (wait 2-4 min

    while it loads) • Browse for toolbox (clicking through the endless tree) • Open tool dialog • Browse for input dataset • Browse for any optional data for analysis • Browse for an output location • Fill out options
  50. Programming GIS 1999-2004 • Start up ArcCatalog (wait 2-4 min

    while it loads) • Browse for toolbox (clicking through the endless tree) • Open tool dialog • Browse for input dataset • Browse for any optional data for analysis • Browse for an output location • Fill out options • Click OK and pray it doesn’t crash
  51. Programming GIS the ArcINFO Way

  52. Programming GIS the ArcINFO Way • Start up Command Prompt

    (about a second)
  53. Programming GIS the ArcINFO Way • Start up Command Prompt

    (about a second) • Type simple command (BUILD, CLIP, etc)
  54. Programming GIS the ArcINFO Way • Start up Command Prompt

    (about a second) • Type simple command (BUILD, CLIP, etc) • Hit Enter
  55. Programming GIS the ArcINFO Way • Start up Command Prompt

    (about a second) • Type simple command (BUILD, CLIP, etc) • Hit Enter • Tell everyone how hard it was
  56. AML Scripting
 in ARC/INFO clip soils studbndy stdysoil

  57. Where is Python Used?

  58. Where is Python Used? • GIS Applications (ArcGIS, QGIS, Safe

    FME, Autodesk)
  59. Where is Python Used? • GIS Applications (ArcGIS, QGIS, Safe

    FME, Autodesk) • Web Frameworks (WeoGeo.com, Google)
  60. Where is Python Used? • GIS Applications (ArcGIS, QGIS, Safe

    FME, Autodesk) • Web Frameworks (WeoGeo.com, Google) • Anywhere (Corel, Civilization, Gmail)
  61. Where is Python Used? • GIS Applications (ArcGIS, QGIS, Safe

    FME, Autodesk) • Web Frameworks (WeoGeo.com, Google) • Anywhere (Corel, Civilization, Gmail) • Become the de-facto scripting language
  62. ArcPy, the New Command Line

  63. ArcPy, the New Command Line • Much like the Arc

    prompt and AML, ArcPy and Python give us a powerful analysis and scripting method.
  64. ArcPy, the New Command Line • Much like the Arc

    prompt and AML, ArcPy and Python give us a powerful analysis and scripting method. • ArcPy builds on the commands we learned 15 years ago.
  65. ArcPy, the New Command Line • Much like the Arc

    prompt and AML, ArcPy and Python give us a powerful analysis and scripting method. • ArcPy builds on the commands we learned 15 years ago. • ArcPy is integrated in ArcMap
  66. ArcPy, the New Command Line • Much like the Arc

    prompt and AML, ArcPy and Python give us a powerful analysis and scripting method. • ArcPy builds on the commands we learned 15 years ago. • ArcPy is integrated in ArcMap • Python can be extended to other GIS platforms such as QGIS.
  67. Python Scripting
 in ArcGIS arcpy.Clip_analysis(soils.shp, studbndy.shp, stdysoil) clip soils studbndy

    stdysoil
  68. Python Scripting With ArcPy import  arcpy   from  arcpy  import

     env   env.workspace  =  "c:/workspace"   #  variables
 in_features  =  "soils.shp"   clip_features  =  "study_boundary.shp"   out_feature_class  =  "c:/workspace/output/study_area_soils.shp"   xy_tolerance  =  ""   #  Execute  Clip   arcpy.Clip_analysis(in_features,  clip_features,
 out_feature_class,  xy_tolerance)
  69. Python Scripting With ArcPy import  arcpy   from  arcpy  import

     env   env.workspace  =  "c:/workspace"   #  variables
 in_features  =  "soils.shp"   clip_features  =  "study_boundary.shp"   out_feature_class  =  "c:/workspace/output/study_area_soils.shp"   xy_tolerance  =  ""   #  Execute  Clip   arcpy.Clip_analysis(in_features,  clip_features,
 out_feature_class,  xy_tolerance)
  70. http://www.flickr.com/photos/wwarby/2989238425/ Python

  71. Export to KML import  arcpy   arcpy.CheckOutExtension(“3D”)   env.workspace  =

     "c:/workspace"   #  variables
 in_feature  =  "c:/data/TIGER2009/04/ARIZONA/tl_2009_04_county.lyr"   out_feature  =  "c:/temp/output.kmz"   #  Execute  KML  Export   arcpy.LayerToKML_conversion(in_feature,  out_feature,1)
  72. Export to KML arcpy.LayerToKML_conversion(input.shp, output.kml, scale)

  73. Python Libraries

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  77. If you like GIS, you like statistics

  78. If you like GIS, you like statistics If you like

    statistics, you like baseball
  79. If you like GIS, you like statistics If you like

    statistics, you like baseball If you like baseball, you should root for the 2010 and 2012 World Series Champion San Francisco Giants
  80. Baseball as an Excuse to Program

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  82. NYY 95 67 .586 +136 BAL 93 69 .574 +7

    TAM 90 72 .556 +120 TOR 73 89 .451 -68 BOS 69 93 .426 -72 DET 88 74 .543 +56 CHS 85 77 .525 +72 KAN 72 90 .444 -70 CLE 68 94 .420 -178 MIN 66 96 .407 -131 OAK 94 68 .580 +99 TEX 93 69 .574 +101 LAA 89 73 .549 +68 SEA 75 87 .463 -32 WAS 98 64 .605 +137 ATL 94 68 .580 +100 PHI 81 81 .500 +4 NYM 74 88 .457 -59 MIA 69 93 .426 -115 CIN 97 65 .599 +81 STL 88 74 .543 +117 MIL 83 79 .512 +43 PIT 79 83 .488 -23 CHC 61 101 .377 -146 HOU 55 107 .340 -211 SFG 94 68 .580 +69 LAD 86 76 .531 +40 ARI 81 81 .500 +46 SDP 76 86 .469 -59 COL 64 98 .395 -132
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  84. #!/usr/bin/python   from  scipy  import  stats   from  pylab  import

     *   #  Read  in  the  data.   mlb  =  loadtxt('mlb.txt',  dtype=[('team',  'S3'),  ('w',  'i'),  ('l',  'i'),   ('pct',  'f'),    ('rdiff',  'i')])   #  Plot  the  data  with  invisible  points.   scatter(mlb['rdiff'],  mlb['w'],  s=0)   xlabel('Run  differential')   ylabel('Wins')   #  Put  team  names  at  the  data  points.   for  (t,  w,  rd)  in  zip(mlb['team'],  mlb['w'],  mlb['rdiff']):     text(rd,  w,  t,  size=9,           horizontalalignment='center',  verticalalignment='center')               #  Perform  the  linear  regression   m,  b,  r,  p,  stderr  =  stats.linregress(mlb['rdiff'],  mlb['w'])   #  Get  endpoints  of  regression  line  and  plot  it.   rdMin  =  min(mlb['rdiff'])   wMin  =  m*rdMin  +  b   rdMax  =  max(mlb['rdiff'])   wMax  =  m*rdMax  +  b   plot([rdMin,  rdMax],  [wMin,  wMax])   show()
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  87. Rainbows and Unicorns

  88. PySAL https://geodacenter.asu.edu/pysal

  89. OpenGeoDa • Spatial Data Manipulation • Visualization and Queries •

    Mapping • Exploratory Data Analysis • Spatial Statistics https://geodacenter.asu.edu/
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  91. The Future for GIS Professionals

  92. So You Want to be a
 Word Processor

  93. The Future for
 Word Processors

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  95. If You... • Put points on a map and throw

    up a scale bar • Perform geoprocessing without Python or Model Builder • Have a job description of “Plotter Operator” • Have no idea what “fuzzy tolerance” is
  96. You’ll be out of a job

  97. If You... • Embrace Python as your GIS tool of

    choice. • Use Model Builder to automate your work flows. • Learn new tools such as TileMill/Mapnik/ PostGIS
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  99. History of GIS Professionals Photo by Johnson Cameraface - http://flic.kr/p/dwQdSq

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  102. Rise of the Database

  103. Rise of the Web

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  111. GIS

  112. GIS Professionals Assimilate New Technology

  113. Technology Comes Early to GIS

  114. Don’t Settle Down with GIS

  115. Cutting edge is lots of work.

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  117. Thanks! James Fee james@spatiallyadjusted.net @cageyjames spatiallyadjusted.com

  118. Thanks! James Fee james@spatiallyadjusted.net @cageyjames spatiallyadjusted.com