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Pre-Roman Italy

3700411ae81a5ba151f9946dcb59c386?s=47 nichsara
February 26, 2013
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Pre-Roman Italy

3700411ae81a5ba151f9946dcb59c386?s=128

nichsara

February 26, 2013
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  1. Pre-­‐Roman  Italy   Reading:   Stokstad,  160-­‐168.     Range:

      1000-­‐200  BCE   Villanovan,  La4n,  Etruscan     Terms/Concepts:   cinerary  urn,  sarcophagus,   fibula,  symposium,  Fufluns,   tumulus    (tumuli),       Monument  List:    6-­‐9,  Husband  and  Wife  on   Dining  Couch,   Sarcophagus,  Cerveteri,   Etruscan,  520  BCE    6-­‐4,  Master  Sculptor   Vulca  (?),  Apollo  (Apulu),   Temple  of  Minerva,  Veii,   Etruscan,  c.  510-­‐500  BCE.    6-­‐7,  Tomb  of  the   Triclinium,  Tarquinia,   Italy,  Etruscan,  c.   480-­‐470.    
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  4. “Tuscan  Order”  

  5. Pronaos   Pronaos   Cella  or  Naos   Cella  or

     Naos   Statue   Statue   Statue   Statue  
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  19. The  “Flo[lla  Fresco,”  Room  5  West  House,  Akro[ri,   Thera,

     1650  BCE.  
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  23. Reclining Couple on a Sarcophagus from Cerveteri. c.520 BCE. Terracotta,

    length 6`7z. Museo Nazionale di Villa Giulia, Rome. (Stokstad 6-9)
  24. Reclining Couple on a Sarcophagus from Cerveteri. c.520 BCE. Terracotta,

    length 6`7z. Museo Nazionale di Villa Giulia, Rome. (Stokstad 6-9)
  25. Sharing  wives  is  an  established  Etruscan  custom.   Etruscan  women

     take  par4cular  care  of  their  bodies   and  exercise  oEen,  some4mes  along  with  the  men,   and  some4mes  by  themselves.  It  is  not  a  disgrace   for  them  to  be  seen  naked.  Further,  they  dine,  not   with  their  own  husbands,  but  with  any  men  who   happen  to  be  present,  and  they  pledge  with  wine   any  whom  they  wish.  They  are  also  expert  drinkers   and  are  very  good  looking.        Theopompus  of  Chios,  Histories,  43    
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  30. Cri[cal  Thinking  Ques[ons   1.  What  are  some  of  the

     major  obstacles  to   interpre[ng  Etruscan  materials?   2.  What  is  the  rela[onship  between  Etruscan   and  Greek  art  and  culture?   3.  How  are  the  roles  of  Etruscan  women  in  art   and  life  different  the  roles  of  Greek  women?   4.  How  do  Etruscan  tombs  incorporate  the   tradi[on  of  the  Greek  symposium?