Upgrade to Pro — share decks privately, control downloads, hide ads and more …

Sculpture

3700411ae81a5ba151f9946dcb59c386?s=47 nichsara
February 14, 2013

 Sculpture

3700411ae81a5ba151f9946dcb59c386?s=128

nichsara

February 14, 2013
Tweet

Transcript

  1. Art  in  the  3rd  Dimension:     Sculpture   Reading:

      Ar,orms,  162-­‐188     Terms/Concepts:   relief,  high  relief,  low  relief,   bas  relief,  sunken  relief,   addiAve,  subtracAve,   modeling,  casAng,  carving,   assembled/constructed   sculpture,  assemblage,   kineAc  sculpture,  mixed   media,     installaAon,  site-­‐specific,   ceramics,  poFer,  firing,   earthenware,  porcelain,   stoneware,  throwing,  slip,   glaze  
  2. Media  Lab   •  Friday  February  15  11:00-­‐3:00  Auraria  Library

     206   •  Tuesday  February  19  2:00-­‐5:30  Auraria  Library  205     Materials  available:  oil  pastel,  chalk  pastel,  pen  &  ink,   pencil,  colored  pencil,  charcoal,  watercolor,  oil  paint,   and  acrylic  paint.  
  3. Quiz  #2  is  due  NEXT  TUESDAY  February  19th.    

    Media  ExperimentaAon  is  due  Thursday   February  21st.     Your  Midterm  is  on  Thursday  February  28th.     Study  guide  will  be  released  this  Thursday   Reminders  
  4. Relief  Sculpture  vs.  Sculpture  in  the  Round   Free-­‐Standing  Sculpture

     
  5. Types  of  Relief   Sunken  Relief   High  Relief  

    Low  Relief   or  “Bas”  Relief  
  6. AddiAve  vs.  SubtracAve   AddiAve  Processes    Modeling    CasAng

       ConstrucAng   SubtracAve  Processes    Carving  
  7. Clay   Earthenware   Stoneware   Kaolin/Porcelain   •  Usually

     White   •  Very  Fine   •  Fewest  ImpuriAes   •  Smooth  texture   •  High  Firing  Temperature   •  Translucent  Sheen   •  Colors  range  from  light  to   dark  browns   •  Texture  ranges  from   slightly  course  to   moderately  coarse   •  High  Firing  Temperature   •  Can  be  very  coarse  in   texture   •  Colors  are  shades  of   red  and  brown   •  Very  High  Firing   Temperature  
  8. None
  9. PoFery   Throwing   Slip  CasAng   Coil  Pots  

  10. Firing:  Historical  Kilns  

  11. right-hand clay into slabs for ease of handling. Although both

    scenes on the Robinson skyphos might be interpreted as showing a simple mass of raw clay, the different types of stippling incision strongly suggest two stages of purification comparable to the effects of the settling basins. Thus the herringbone-hatched mass on side B FIG. 5. Providence 25109. Red-figure lekythos illustrations of kilns on the plaques. All of these show the The  Kiln   If  you  will  pay  me  for  my  song,  O  poFers,   Then  come,  Athena,  and  hold  thy  hand  above  the  kiln!   May  the  kotyloi  and  all  the  kanastra  turn  a  good  black,   May  they  be  well  fired  and  fetch  the  price  asked,   Many  being  sold  in  the  marketplace  and  many  on  the  roads,   And  bring  in  much  money,  and  may  my  song  be  pleasing.   But  if  you  (poFers)  turn  shameless  and  deceihul,   Then  do  I  summon  the  ravagers  of  kilns,   Both  Syntrips  (Smasher)  and  Smaragos  (Crasher)  and              Asbetos  (Unquenchable)  too,  and  Sabaktes  (Shake-­‐to-­‐Pieces)   And  Omodamos  (Conqueror  of  the  Unbaked),  who  makes              much  trouble  for  this  craj.   Stamp  on  stoking  tunnel  and  chambers,  and  may  the  whole  kiln   Be  thrown  into  confusing,  while  the  poFers  loudly  wail.   As  grinds  a  horse’s  jaw  so  may  the  kiln  grind   To  powder  all  the  pots  within  it.   [Come,  too,  daughter  of  the  Sun,  Circe  of  many  spells,   Cast  cruel  spells,  do  evil  to  them  and  their  handiwork.   Here  too  let  Cheiron  lead  many  Centaurs,   Both  those  that  escaped  the  hands  of  Herakles  and  those  that  perished.   May  they  his  these  pots  hard,  and  may  the  kiln  collapse.   And  may  the  poFers  wail  as  they  see  the  mischief.   But  I  shall  rejoiced  at  the  sight  of  their  luckless  craj.]   And  if  anyone  bends  over  to  look  into  the  spy-­‐hole,  may  his  whole  face     Be  scorched,  so  that  all  may  learn  to  deal  justly.  
  12. Firing:  Today  

  13. Metal   Bronze   Steel   Gold  

  14. Piece  Mold  CasAng  

  15. Repousse  Phiale,  Gold,  HellenisAc,  c.  2nd  century  BCE  

  16. Stone   Granite   Soapstone   Basalt   Alabaster  

    Limestone   Marble  
  17. None
  18. None
  19. None
  20. Mixed  Media   Pablo  Picasso,  Bull’s  Head,   Seat  and

     handles,  1943   Assemblage   ConstrucAon  
  21. Unexpected  Materials   Janine  Antoni,  Gnaw,  1992.  

  22. Unexpected  Materials   Janine  Antoni,  Lick  &  Lather,  1992.  

  23. Auguste  Rodin,  Burghers  of  Calais,  1889,   Victoria  Tower  Gardens,

     London.    
  24. Space  

  25. Space  

  26. Space  

  27. Space  

  28. Space  

  29. InstallaAon   Fred  Wilson,  Mining  the   Museum,  1992.  

     InstallaAon.   Cigar-­‐Store  Indians  facing   photographs  of  NaAve   American  Marylanders.  
  30. Ai  WeiWei,  Sunflower  Seeds,  Twice-­‐Fired  Porcelain,  Tate  Modern,  2010.  

      Sunflower  Seeds  of  Twice-­‐Fired  Porcelain  
  31. None
  32. Richard  Serra,  Tilted  Arc,  Federal  Plaza,  New  York  City,  1981.

      Site  Specific  
  33.  Danny  Katz:  "Arrogant  posiAon  that  art  jusAfies  interference  with  the

     simple   joys  of  human  acAvity  in  the  plaza.    This  is  not  a  great  plaza  by  internaAonal   standards,  but  a  small  refuge  and  place  of  revival  for  people  who  ride  to  work   in  steel  containers,  work  in  sealed  rooms  (with  no  windows)  and  breathe   recirculated  air  all  day.  Is  the  purpose  of  art  to  stress  the  absence  of  joy  and   hope?  I  can't  believe  this  was  the  arAsAc  intenAon,  yet  sadly  this  has  been  the   dominant  effect  of  the  work  (It  is  arguable  that  "stressing  the  absence  of  joy   and  hope"  was  part  of  Serra's  purpose,  as  interpreted  by  Horowitz  )...I  can   accept  anything  in  art,  but  I  can't  accept  physical  assault  and  complete   destrucAon  of  ordinary  human  acAvity...no  work  of  art  created  with  a   contempt  of  ordinary  humanity  and  w/o  respect  for  the  common  element  of   human  experience  can  be  great...I  suggest  Mr.  Serra  take  advantage  of  this   opportunity  to  walk  away  from  this  fiasco  and  move  the  work  to  a  place  where   it  will  beFer  reveal  its  beauty.”   Richard  Serra,  Tilted  Arc,  Federal  Plaza,  New  York  City,  1981.  
  34. Serra:  To  remove  Tilted  Arc  would  be  to  destroy  it

        •   To  move  it  is  to  destroy  it  as  it  was  designed  for  that  site   •   I  don't  make  portable  objects  that  can  be  relocated   •  Make  works  that  deal  with  env.  components  of  given  places   •  Scale,  size  locaAon  of  site  specific  works  are  determine  by   the  characterisAcs  of  the  site   •  Works  become  part  of  and  built  into  structure  of  site  and   ojen  restructure  it  both  conceptually  and  perceptually   Richard  Serra,  Tilted  Arc,  Federal  Plaza,  New  York  City,  1981.  
  35. 1981   1989   1989   Richard  Serra,  Tilted  Arc,

     Federal  Plaza,  New  York  City,  1981.   1989