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Three.ie Materials

Three.ie Materials

6bd3c70e514e71e5bf4591922f3da0f7?s=128

Rowan Manahan

October 03, 2017
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Transcript

  1. I’ll use these little annotation boxes to make sense of

    the more cryptic slides because, as we said in the workshop, slides and handouts are not the same thing and if your slide can ‘stand on its own’ and serves as a good handout, then it is by definition, a crappy slide. RM
  2. Helvetic Neue for sources & charts Font size: 24 Font

    weight: Regular Font weight: Medium Font weight: Bold Arial Black 62 Galaxie Copernicus 40 Helvetica Neue 40 Helvetica Neue 36 This circle
 should be
 circular 1280 x 720 It’s a good idea to have a tester slide like this to check fonts, colours, and that the projector/TV is showing your slides in the right format or shape.
  3. simple ≠ easy

  4. Throughout human history, we have revered the great communicators -

    no matter what their field of expertise, we love people who can really talk.
  5. None
  6. An example of superb brevity and clarity in a pitch

    - this is Herb Kelleher’s vision for SouthWest Airlines, literally written on the back of a napkin.
  7. Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth

    on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate - we cannot consecrate - we cannot hallow - this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us - that from these honoured dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion - that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain - that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom - and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth. Or Abraham Lincoln’s extraordinary Gettysburg Address - setting out in 272 words the essence of what really mattered for his nation.
  8. Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth

    on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate - we cannot consecrate - we cannot hallow - this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us - that from these honoured dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion - that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain - that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom - and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth. The past
  9. Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth

    on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate - we cannot consecrate - we cannot hallow - this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us - that from these honoured dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion - that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain - that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom - and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth. The present
  10. Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth

    on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal. Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. But, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate - we cannot consecrate - we cannot hallow - this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us - that from these honoured dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion - that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain - that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom - and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth. The future
  11. 150 I’ve taken a reductionist approach to Speaking and Presenting

    - and distilled it down to one number and one word. The number is 150 - the rate of words per minute that most native english speakers use when talking to other native english speakers.
  12. And for that reason, you should steer away from PowerPoint,

    Keynote, Prezi, etc. when you are authoring your presentations and instead start with …
  13. … a blank document in your Word processor of choice.

    This allows you track your wordcount, which means you will never …
  14. …run over time for your talk. On a more serious

    note, it also allows you to check the length of each of the sections / points that you are making in your presentation (much as I did with the Gettysburg Address above) to see if your talk is proportionate to the point(s) you are trying to make.
  15. What is written without effort is,
 in general, read without

    pleasure. Samuel Johnson “ ” Most really bad presentations are fundamentally flawed by ill-considered, unfocused writing.
  16. I was fascinated to watch this principle being applied to

    great effect by my teenage daughter and her Debating team. They brought a tremendous degree of precision and discipline to their writing and it immediately showed in their delivery.
  17. A practice card for rehearsals: * Green for tracking time

    * Yellow for pauses * Blue for pronunciation * Red for heavy emphasis
  18. Obama’s victory speech from Chicago, November 2008: “Tonight is your

    answer.”
  19. If there | is anyone out there || who still

    doubts | that America is a place where… all things are possible, | who still wonders ||| if the dream of our founders is alive in our time, who still questions ||| the power of our democracy, tonight || is your answer. The practice card. We produce speeches for clients, written out like this in 16pt - sometimes it looks like poetry. (If only!)
  20. Winston Churchill used the same technique when he had his

    speeches typed up for delivery.
  21. This sentence has five words. Here are five more words.

    Five-word sentences are fine. But several together are monotonous. Listen to what is happening. The writing is getting boring. The sound of it drones. It’s like a stuck record. The ear demands some variety.
  22. Now listen. I vary the sentence length and I create

    music. Music. The writing sings. It has a pleasant rhythm, a lilt, a harmony. I use short sentences. And I use sentences of medium length ...
  23. And sometimes, when I am certain the reader is rested,

    I will engage him with a sentence 
 of considerable length, a sentence that burns with energy and builds with all the impetus 
 of a crescendo, the roll of the drums, the crash of cymbals – sounds that say,
 “Listen to this, it is important.” Gary Provost (100 Ways to Improve Your Writing, 1985)
  24. To go back a bit further, Aristotle wrote of the

    3 Artistic Proofs in order to sway your audience…
  25. LOGOS PATHOS ETHOS Ethos - your credibility as a speaker.

    Logos - pure logic. Pathos - the appeal to emotion.
  26. LOGOS PATHOS ETHOS What proportion are you going to use

    for this presentation to this audience?
  27. LOGOS PATHOS ETHOS Is it all about your personal credibility,

    with a minimal need to get their hearts racing?
  28. LOGOS PATHOS ETHOS Or do they fancy themselves as purists,

    so any appeal outside of “just the facts” will be looked upon with scorn?
  29. LOGOS PATHOS ETHOS Or should it be fairly evenly balanced

    between the 3 Proofs (appeals) but done in such a way that the audience does not necessarily realise that you are stamping your authority, or manipulating their emotions?
  30. For a great example of all of this coming together,

    watch Panti’s Noble Call speech from 2014 (link is in the handout).
  31. Hello. My name is Panti and for the benefit of

    the visually impaired or the incredibly naïve, I am a drag queen, a performer, and an accidental and occasional gay rights activist. And as you may have already gathered, I am also painfully middle-class. My father was a country vet, I went to a nice school, and afterwards to that most middle-class of institutions - art college. And although this may surprise some of you, I have always managed to find gainful employment in my chosen field - gender discombobulation. So the grinding, abject poverty so powerfully displayed in tonight's performance is something I can thankfully say I have no experience of. But oppression is something I can relate to. Oh, I'm not comparing my experience to Dublin workers of 1913, but I do know what it feels like to be put in your place. Have you ever been standing at a pedestrian crossing when a car drives by and in it are a bunch of lads, and they lean out the window and they shout "Fag!" and throw a milk carton at you? Now it doesn't really hurt. It's just a wet carton and anyway they're right – I am a fag. But it feels oppressive. When it really does hurt, is afterwards. Afterwards I wonder and worry and obsess over what was it about me, what was it they saw in me? What was it that gave me away? And I hate myself for wondering that. It feels oppressive and the next time I'm at a pedestrian crossing I check myself to see what is it about me that "gives the gay away" and I check myself to make sure I'm not doing it this time. Have any of you ever come home in the evening and turned on the television and there is a panel of people - nice people, respectable people, smart people, the kind of people who It’s an extraordinary example of the power of rhetoric, using all 3 Proofs, and calling upon rhetorical devices thousands of years old.
  32. Hello. My name is Panti and for the benefit of

    the visually impaired or the incredibly naïve, I am a drag queen, a performer, and an accidental and occasional gay rights activist. And as you may have already gathered, I am also painfully middle-class. My father was a country vet, I went to a nice school, and afterwards to that most middle-class of institutions - art college. And although this may surprise some of you, I have always managed to find gainful employment in my chosen field - gender discombobulation. So the grinding, abject poverty so powerfully displayed in tonight's performance is something I can thankfully say I have no experience of. But oppression is something I can relate to. Oh, I'm not comparing my experience to Dublin workers of 1913, but I do know what it feels like to be put in your place. Have you ever been standing at a pedestrian crossing when a car drives by and in it are a bunch of lads, and they lean out the window and they shout "Fag!" and throw a milk carton at you? Now it doesn't really hurt. It's just a wet carton and anyway they're right – I am a fag. But it feels oppressive. When it really does hurt, is afterwards. Afterwards I wonder and worry and obsess over what was it about me, what was it they saw in me? What was it that gave me away? And I hate myself for wondering that. It feels oppressive and the next time I'm at a pedestrian crossing I check myself to see what is it about me that "gives the gay away" and I check myself to make sure I'm not doing it this time. Have any of you ever come home in the evening and turned on the television and there is a panel of people - nice people, respectable people, smart people, the kind of people who make good neighbourly neighbours and write for newspapers. And they are having a reasoned debate about you. About what kind of a person you are, about whether you are capable of being a good parent, about whether you want to destroy marriage, about whether you are safe around children, about whether God herself thinks you are an abomination, about whether in fact you are "intrinsically disordered". And even the nice TV presenter lady who you feel like you know thinks it's perfectly ok that they are all having this reasonable debate about who you are and what rights you “deserve". And that feels oppressive. Have you ever been on a crowded train with your gay friend and a small part of you is cringing because he is being SO gay and you find yourself trying to compensate by butching up or nudging the conversation onto "straighter" territory? This is you who have spent 35 years trying to be the best gay possible and yet still a small part of you is embarrassed by his gayness. And I hate myself for that. And that feels oppressive. And when I'm standing at the pedestrian lights I am checking myself. Have you ever gone into your favourite neighbourhood café with the paper that you buy every day, and you open it up and inside is a 500-word opinion written by a nice middle-class woman, the kind of woman who probably gives to charity, the kind of woman that you would be happy to leave your children with. And she is arguing so reasonably about whether you should be treated less than everybody else, arguing that you should be given fewer rights than everybody else. And when the woman at the next table gets up and excuses herself to squeeze by you with a smile you wonder, "Does she think that about me too?” And that feels oppressive. And you go outside and you stand at the pedestrian crossing and you check yourself and I hate myself for that. Have you ever turned on the computer and seen videos of people just like you in far away countries, and countries not far away at all, being beaten and imprisoned and tortured and murdered because they are just like you? And that feels oppressive. Three weeks ago I was on the television and I said that I believed that people who actively campaign for gay people to be treated less or differently are, in my gay opinion, homophobic. Some people, people who actively campaign for gay people to be treated less under the law took great exception at this characterisation and threatened legal action against me and RTÉ. RTÉ, in its wisdom, decided incredibly quickly to hand over a huge sum of money to make it go away. I haven't been so lucky. And for the last three weeks I have been lectured by heterosexual people about what homophobia is and who should be allowed identify it. Straight people - ministers, senators, lawyers, journalists - have lined up to tell me what homophobia is and what I am allowed to feel oppressed by. People who have never experienced homophobia in their lives, people who have never checked themselves at a pedestrian crossing, have told me that unless I am being thrown in prison or herded onto a cattle train, then it is not homophobia. And that feels oppressive. So now Irish gay people find ourselves in a ludicrous situation where not only are we not allowed to say publicly what we feel oppressed by, we are not even allowed to think it because our definition has been disallowed by our betters. And for the last three weeks I have been denounced from the floor of parliament to newspaper columns to the seething morass of internet commentary for "hate speech" because I dared to use the word "homophobia". And a jumped-up queer like me should know that the word "homophobia" is no longer available to gay people. Which is a spectacular and neat Orwellian trick because now it turns out that gay people are not the victims of homophobia - homophobes are. But I want to say that it is not true. I don't hate you. I do, it is true, believe that almost all of you are probably homophobes. But I'm a homophobe. It would be incredible if we weren't. To grow up in a society that is overwhelmingly homophobic and to escape unscathed would be miraculous. So I don't hate you because you are homophobic. I actually admire you. I admire you because most of you are only a bit homophobic. Which all things considered is pretty good going. But I do sometimes hate myself. I hate myself because I fucking check myself while standing at pedestrian crossings. And sometimes I hate you for doing that to me. But not right now. Right now, I like you all very much for giving me a few moments of your time. And I thank you for it. Allusion. Rhythm. Analogy. Inarguable logic. Building emotion. Oxymoron. Anaphora … Cicero himself would approve.
  33. How well we communicate
 is determined not by how well

    we say things, but by how well we are understood. “ ” Andy Grove Solid writing - capturing all of your ideas - ensures that you will have impact and be understood, not misunderstood.
  34. “ ” People will forget what you said, they will

    forget what you did, but they will never forget how you made them feel. Maya Angelou It will also forge emotional connections and therefore memorability in your audience’s brains.
  35. My Earth-shattering Presentation • C’mere, this is important • Really

    important • Wait ’til I tell you! • Your eyes will boggle • Your jaw will drop • Your heart will race - really! • So listen up! DRAFT This does not happen when you bash your first-draft ideas down onto a PowerPoint.
  36. 150 So the number is 150 …

  37. RESPECT … the word is RESPECT. Presenters usually don’t show

    this lack of respect overtly - they are rarely aggressive or verbally abusive, but they can demonstrate a lack of respect in a myriad of ways.
  38. Clarity RESPECT Can you capture your presentation in a Tweet?

    What’s the 30-second version?
  39. Newspapers are very good at this sort of headline /

    strapline writing.
  40. Apple reinvents the phone Can you sum up the essence

    of your presentation in such a headline?
  41. Logic is
 not enough Always remembering that facts and logic

    (which should be inarguable) are rarely persuasive by themselves. Humans need more than that.
  42. If logic were enough…

  43. “ ” People will forget what you said, they will

    forget what you did, but they will never forget how you made them feel. Maya Angelou
  44. = Jargon RESPECT Clarity

  45. None
  46. What is written without effort is,
 in general, read without

    pleasure. Samuel Johnson “ ” Anyone can write badly, carelessly, or disrespectfully…
  47. RESPECT Yourself You’re the speaker/presenter - if you want them

    to listen, you need to help them to do that.
  48. Reading the sentence below this one is FORBIDDEN! Well, aren’t

    you a little rebel then? The written word is bizarrely powerful to human beings. If you put something up on the screen, your audience will read it, even if you are talking and explaining it.
  49. This diminishes you in the room - Steve Jobs called

    this moment from a MacWorld conference, “The worst staging mistake of my life.” (Because always remember it is a stage and you are performing.)
  50. Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5

    Step 6 Step 7 Big 8 Step 9 Step 10 While people are reading ahead - because you have splurged all the material up there in front of their eyes - they (a) cannot hear you, because we have such limited cognitive capacity and (b) they are making up their own minds what it all means.
  51. Step 1

  52. Step 1 Step 2 So release the information sequentially -

    in time with your carefully-written script. The slides should change (without jarring the eyes) as you introduce each key piece of information…
  53. Step 1 Step 2 Step 3

  54. Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4

  55. Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 4

    This is different because it blah blah blah and then it goes yadda yadda yadda before moving on the rhubarb rhubarb rhubarb Then, if something has changed that is affecting the usual model (or P&L or whatever) you can expand upon that for a moment to establish the context.
  56. Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Come back

    to your flow…
  57. Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5

    Step 6 Step 7 “No changes in these steps…”
  58. Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5

    Step 6 Step 7 Big 8 “but we see the impact here…”
  59. Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5

    Step 6 Step 7 Big 8 Step 9 “which has changed this…”
  60. Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4 Step 5

    Step 6 Step 7 Big 8 Step 9 Step 10 “with this ultimate outcome.”
  61. My Earth-shattering Presentation • C’mere, this is important • Really

    important • Wait ’til I tell you! • Your eyes will boggle • Your jaw will drop • Your heart will race - really! • So listen up! OR - you can go “Splat” and hope that you are somehow the exception to the rules of human neuroscience.
  62. SPLAT!

  63. SPLAT!

  64. SPLAAAAAAAT!

  65. Good presenters speak, and the PowerPoint follows them. Bad presenters

    follow 
 their PowerPoint. “ Manahan’s Golden Maxim…
  66. RESPECT Yourself - own the room If you want to

    have ‘presence’ when you speak, and demonstrate authority in the space, then you need to know the space.
  67. I had a near-miss in this place just after it

    opened…
  68. In a room with a 6-meter ceiling, this is what

    my test-slide should have looked like…
  69. This is what it actually looked like. It took two

    men, with a huge A-frame scaffold on wheels, 90 minutes to fix the problem.
  70. From Spring 2017 - the Speaker of the House tries

    to sell ‘Trumpcare’…
  71. …and they haven’t even bothered to get the slide size

    right for the TV they are using to display it. Great attention to detail there guys!
  72. RESPECT Messaging Most people gravely overestimate how much an audience

    can take - in terms of time, and in terms of number of ‘this-is- really-important’ concepts.
  73. Whistle Shoe Wedding ring Orange Spectacles Puppy Pencil Frame Headscarf

    Whiskey Whiskey Whiskey Candle Television Mug Window Laptop Software Notepad Diamond When presented with a short list of disconnected concepts. No narrative flow, no connective tissue, no emotional associations being made by the speaker…
  74. The majority of people remember the first thing they heard,

    the last thing they heard and anything that is repeated in the middle.
  75. They will typically also remember some other item from the

    list, the problem being that different people remember different things.
  76. An illustration of this from the USA - these are

    the things that 6,000 people remembered in a survey after Obama’s State of The Union Address a few years ago.
  77. And this is what he actually said - and be

    assured that ‘Salmon’ was not a key point he wanted the audience to take away with them!
  78. In writing, you must kill all of your darlings. William

    Faulkner “ ” So, often, you have to kill off a nice analogy, or an interesting (to you) example, because it distracts from the key point you want your audience to take away
  79. RESPECT Tell stories A vital way to enhance the memorability

    of your points is to string them together with a narrative flow.
  80. Hans Rosling was a genius at doing this.

  81. So this is when I realised there is a need

    to communicate Hans Rosling “ ” Because he was massively respectful of his audience’s time and attention.
  82. Consolidated Y/E P&L (€millions) Year 1 % Year 2 %

    Year 3 % Turnover 9,278 100.0 8,340 100.0 7,688 100.0 Cost of sales 8,757 94.4 8,281 99.3 7,263 94.5 Gross Profit 521 5.6 49 0.7 425 5.5 Op Ex -77 -0.8 -137 -1.6 -140 -1.7 Op Profit 444 4.8 -88 1.1 295 3.8 Oth Costs / Income -68 -0.7 166 2 95 1.2 Profit before I&T 376 4.1 78 0.9 390 5.1 Net Interest receivable (payable) -226 -2.4 -278 -3.3 -255 -3.3 Profit on Ord Act before T 150 1.6 -200 -2.4 135 1.8 Tax on Ord Act Profit -69 0.7 -71 -0.9 -50 0.7 Profit on Ord Act after T 81 0.9 -129 -1.5 85 1.1 You need to find the story in the data - no matter how prosaic it may look.
  83. Consolidated Y/E P&L (€millions) Year 1 % Year 2 %

    Year 3 % Turnover 9,278 100.0 8,340 100.0 7,688 100.0 Cost of sales 8,757 94.4 8,281 99.3 7,263 94.5 Gross Profit 521 5.6 49 0.7 425 5.5 Op Ex -77 -0.8 -137 -1.6 -140 -1.7 Op Profit 444 4.8 -88 1.1 295 3.8 Oth Costs / Income -68 -0.7 166 2 95 1.2 Profit before I&T 376 4.1 78 0.9 390 5.1 Net Interest receivable (payable) -226 -2.4 -278 -3.3 -255 -3.3 Profit on Ord Act before T 150 1.6 -200 -2.4 135 1.8 Tax on Ord Act Profit -69 0.7 -71 -0.9 -50 0.7 Profit on Ord Act after T 81 0.9 -129 -1.5 85 1.1 Declining top line …
  84. Consolidated Y/E P&L (€millions) Year 1 % Year 2 %

    Year 3 % Turnover 9,278 100.0 8,340 100.0 7,688 100.0 Cost of sales 8,757 94.4 8,281 99.3 7,263 94.5 Gross Profit 521 5.6 49 0.7 425 5.5 Op Ex -77 -0.8 -137 -1.6 -140 -1.7 Op Profit 444 4.8 -88 1.1 295 3.8 Oth Costs / Income -68 -0.7 166 2 95 1.2 Profit before I&T 376 4.1 78 0.9 390 5.1 Net Interest receivable (payable) -226 -2.4 -278 -3.3 -255 -3.3 Profit on Ord Act before T 150 1.6 -200 -2.4 135 1.8 Tax on Ord Act Profit -69 0.7 -71 -0.9 -50 0.7 Profit on Ord Act after T 81 0.9 -129 -1.5 85 1.1 (Maybe waiting for new products?)
  85. Consolidated Y/E P&L (€millions) Year 1 % Year 2 %

    Year 3 % Turnover 9,278 100.0 8,340 100.0 7,688 100.0 Cost of sales 8,757 94.4 8,281 99.3 7,263 94.5 Gross Profit 521 5.6 49 0.7 425 5.5 Op Ex -77 -0.8 -137 -1.6 -140 -1.7 Op Profit 444 4.8 -88 1.1 295 3.8 Oth Costs / Income -68 -0.7 166 2 95 1.2 Profit before I&T 376 4.1 78 0.9 390 5.1 Net Interest receivable (payable) -226 -2.4 -278 -3.3 -255 -3.3 Profit on Ord Act before T 150 1.6 -200 -2.4 135 1.8 Tax on Ord Act Profit -69 0.7 -71 -0.9 -50 0.7 Profit on Ord Act after T 81 0.9 -129 -1.5 85 1.1 Bottom line holding its own, and then there’s a major problem in Year 2, but thankfully it recovers in Year 3.
  86. Consolidated Y/E P&L (€millions) Year 1 % Year 2 %

    Year 3 % Turnover 9,278 100.0 8,340 100.0 7,688 100.0 Cost of sales 8,757 94.4 8,281 99.3 7,263 94.5 Gross Profit 521 5.6 49 0.7 425 5.5 Op Ex -77 -0.8 -137 -1.6 -140 -1.7 Op Profit 444 4.8 -88 1.1 295 3.8 Oth Costs / Income -68 -0.7 166 2 95 1.2 Profit before I&T 376 4.1 78 0.9 390 5.1 Net Interest receivable (payable) -226 -2.4 -278 -3.3 -255 -3.3 Profit on Ord Act before T 150 1.6 -200 -2.4 135 1.8 Tax on Ord Act Profit -69 0.7 -71 -0.9 -50 0.7 Profit on Ord Act after T 81 0.9 -129 -1.5 85 1.1 Cause: a 5-point surge in raw material costs. So the Hero is the person in Procurement who sorted out that issue.
  87. Consolidated Y/E P&L (€millions) Year 1 % Year 2 %

    Year 3 % Turnover 9,278 100.0 8,340 100.0 7,688 100.0 Cost of sales 8,757 94.4 8,281 99.3 7,263 94.5 Gross Profit 521 5.6 49 0.7 425 5.5 Op Ex -77 -0.8 -137 -1.6 -140 -1.7 Op Profit 444 4.8 -88 1.1 295 3.8 Oth Costs / Income -68 -0.7 166 2 95 1.2 Profit before I&T 376 4.1 78 0.9 390 5.1 Net Interest receivable (payable) -226 -2.4 -278 -3.3 -255 -3.3 Profit on Ord Act before T 150 1.6 -200 -2.4 135 1.8 Tax on Ord Act Profit -69 0.7 -71 -0.9 -50 0.7 Profit on Ord Act after T 81 0.9 -129 -1.5 85 1.1 Are there any questions?
  88. RESPECT Show, don’t tell Avoid text when you can -

    the whole idea of slides is that they should serve as visual aids for the audience. Speech and written text were very late-stage additions in human evolution…
  89. For hundreds of millions of years, the eye is what

    kept our mammalian ancestors alive. Hence a visual aid is umpteen times more powerful than a text-based aid.
  90. So make sure your slides pass the Glance Test -

    do they make sense in 3 seconds?
  91. Because I think we can all agree that this one

    does not.
  92. Nor does this one. In fact this one is a

    good illustration of a lot of what goes wrong with corporate templates…
  93. Logos - I know that Marketing are in love with

    the company logo, but we absolutely do not need to have it on every slide. The human eye has evolved as a detector of variations in the immediate environment. If the eye is presented with an unvarying stimulus, it cognitively tunes it out…
  94. With the exception of the headline, all of this stuff

    on the slide (repeated on every slide in the deck) is just decoration and serves no purpose. It is literally just taking up room on your slide.
  95. Finally, putting your 4 arguments/points is fine on a handout,

    but is a really bad idea on a slide. One point per slide! (You can always put a summary at the end.)
  96. Where possible, show - don’t tell.

  97. The march of time…

  98. Show me how cool your new product is.

  99. Instantly memorable.

  100. Ironic justice.

  101. An alternative solution!

  102. Vatican conclave 2005…

  103. The march of progress.

  104. Explaining to a foreign visitor that Ireland is a little

    bit less formal than they may be used to…
  105. Avoid death from bullets RESPECT You can use the tech

    to minimise the usual stream of bullet points - drop your script into the Notes Pane and turn on Presenter View.
  106. Great presenters and speakers do this all the time. Obama

    is a great speaker, but …
  107. … he always has his TelePrompter with him when he’s

    delivering a speech.
  108. Same at big conferences. The smart ones have comfort screens

    showing the current slide and the next slide that’s coming up.
  109. Presenter tools These are built in to you Presentation software

    in the form of the Presenter View.
  110. EXAMPLE: If I’m talking about the difference between pitching and

    other competitive events, I use this slide.
  111. Pitching is Binary! •Pitching: •Win or Lose - no middle

    ground •Zero for second place •Pro tennis player: •Big prize money •Sponsorship continues •Next tournament If I put the points I’m making up on the screen (to remind myself what to say) I end up with standard crappy PowerPoint.
  112. If a top-notch tennis player loses a match in a

    grand-slam tournament ... (a) he s9ll gets a sizeable paycheque ... (b) he doesn’t lose his sponsorship deal with Nike So it’s painful, it’s unpleasant, but it’s not the end of the world ... But if I use Presenter View, I can have my script up on my comfort screen, plus an overview of where I am in my preso.
  113. RTFM Well worth knowing - so learn how to do

    this with a split-screen spread over two monitors.
  114. RESPECT No crow’s feet No matter what you’re showing, do

    NOT make them squint!
  115. I realise this is a 
 bit hard to see...

    “ ” How often have you said this?
  116. I realise this is a 
 is a bit crowded...

    “ ” slide Or this?
  117. Why would you make your slides into an impromptu eye

    test for your audience?
  118. This is a fairly lengthy block of text. It has

    lots of words, but not broken out as bullet points, because while I am a decidedly unpleasant and judgemental person, I’m not a complete monster. I am merely using this block of text to illustrate how big the font needs to be in order for people to be able to comfortably read it, without recourse to squinting or opera glasses. Key question - how visible is this from the front of the room, and from the back of the room? Because, if you are giving half of your audience a hard time seeing your material, how on earth do you expect to inform them or persuade them of anything? By the way, this is Helvetica 12 point.
  119. This is a fairly lengthy block of text. It has

    lots of words, but not broken out as bullet points, because while I am a decidedly unpleasant and judgmental person, I’m not a complete monster. I am merely using this block of text to illustrate how big the font needs to be in order for people to be able to comfortably read it, without recourse to squinting or opera glasses. Key question - how visible is this from the front of the room, and from the back of the room? Because, if you are giving half of your audience a hard time seeing your material, how on earth do you expect to inform them or persuade them of anything? By the way, this is Helvetica 24 point.
  120. This is a fairly lengthy block of text. It has

    lots of words, but not broken out as bullet points, because while I am a decidedly unpleasant and judgmental person, I’m not a complete monster. I am merely using this block of text to illustrate how big the font needs to be in order for people to be able to comfortably read it, without recourse to squinting or opera glasses. Key question - how visible is this from the front of the room, and from the back of the room? Because,
  121. This is a fairly lengthy block of text. It has

    lots of words, but not broken out as bullet points, because while I am a decidedly unpleasant and judgemental person, I’m not a complete monster. I am merely using this block of text to illustrate how big the font needs to be in order for people to be able to comfortably read it, without recourse to squinting or opera glasses. Key question - how visible is this from the front of the room, and from the back of the room? Because, if you are giving half of your audience a hard time seeing your material, how on earth do you expect to inform them or persuade them of anything? By the way, this is Helvetica 12 point.
  122. Bill Gates never got the memo…

  123. People do this with screengrabs all the time.

  124. It’s good that you are showing the provenance of the

    article, but pointless if 90% of your audience can’t see it to read it. If I can’t see it, I can’t be persuaded by it.
  125. Instead, do what they do on the TV news every

    night. My protocol is to use a different background colour when I use sourced material…
  126. A nice crispy image of the front cover of the

    relevant magazine (sourced via Google Advanced Image Search)…
  127. Blah blah, yadda yadda, more HR bullshit. Here’s a supposedly

    wise quote from some dilettante who’s never done a real day’s work in his life. It’s incredible that anyone would even read this twaddle, much less take it seriously ... And a pull quote from the article.
  128. Also, if you are going to show screen grabs, make

    sure you capture it on the highest-res screen you have (at least 1440 pixels across) and then…
  129. Crop the image to zoom in on just the bit

    you want to highlight.
  130. And you can use callout boxes around the elements you

    are talking about.
  131. Or, you can use slides that ignore every fundamental rule

    of effective learning.
  132. None
  133. None
  134. RESPECT What matters? The final visual rule that these typical

    slides ignore is the rule of Salience…
  135. What matters on this screen? What’s important? What’s the point

    the presenter is trying to make?
  136. 0 6 12 18 24 30 Minimum Target Actual/Bgt Maximum

    2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Total Plan Comparisons 2002-07 $MM Historical & Projected Bonus Plan Payouts If you want to point out that 2005 was a crunch year, in which no bonuses were paid out - then you need to give that data the appropriate prominence.
  137. We see this lack of salience all around us -

    there’s so many deals and offers in this supermarket that it is overwhelming.
  138. This shop in my local village apparently sells … well,

    everything.
  139. Contrast that with Hermès…

  140. Or Louis Vuitton.

  141. The human eye is easily confused and overwhelmed. Don’t plonk

    a bunch of stuff up on a slide and expect your audience to be able to interpret it. You do the work!
  142. Out of clutter, 
 find simplicity. “ Albert Einstein

  143. Banish Stephen Hawking RESPECT Vocal variation is important - in

    terms of pitch and pace in your voice and in terms of the tone that you adopt.
  144. Monotone A bit self-
 conscious Shortness
 of breath Monotone arises

    from these two factors, couple with a concern for being seen to be authoritative/serious in corporate settings.
  145. Monotone A bit self-
 conscious Shortness
 of breath And it’s

    a very short leap from monotone to monotonous…
  146. 3 Talk rehearsal 24/Sep/17 00:14:47 3 Talk rehearsal 22/Sep/17 00:14:35

    Your new best friend. Record yourself and see how you sound. Boring or interesting? Interested or detached? Declarative or interrogative in your tone?
  147. RESPECT Know your sh*t (The stuff that makes your preso

    look effortless but which takes a hell of a lot of effort)
  148. His set sounds like a ramble but has, in reality,

    been meticulously planned from paper to stage. “ ” Great comedians have the skill of making it look like they are thinking it up as they go along, whereas they are doing anything but. Review of a Dylan Moran performance
  149. Professionals rehearse, whereas amateurs
 hope for the best. “ Manahan’s

    other Golden Maxim.
  150. Prep is proportional to REWARD The amount of effort should

    vary…
  151. PeNN TeLLeR These guys play to 1475 people per performance,

    8 shows a week, with the cheapest ticket being $90. And that’s before they sell any merchandise…
  152. So yes, the amount of effort should vary… And for

    these guys, there’s big $ at stake every time they introduce something new into their show.
  153. Not to mention the physical jeopardy, should something go wrong

    due to under- preparedness…
  154. Not to mention the physical jeopardy, should something go wrong

    due to under- preparedness… Notice the little black screen at the back of the board to provide a consistent, high-contrast backdrop for the nails. The devil is in the details!
  155. You will be fooled by a magic trick if it

    involves more time, money and practice than you (or any other sane onlooker) would be willing to invest. Mr Teller’s secret to great performance.
  156. Prep is proportional to REWARD So yes, the amount of

    effort should vary…
  157. Yeah, I don’t like to
 be over-rehearsed -
 it makes

    me stale. “ ” But this kind of pushback is just a rationalisation for a lazy approach.
  158. We’re so busy, we
 simply don’t have
 time to rehearse.

    “ ” As is this. My translation of this line? “I don’t really care about the outcome of this presentation.”
  159. Try telling these people that they don’t need to rehearse

    all that much.
  160. Or that too much rehearsal will make them sound stale

    to their audience.
  161. None
  162. None
  163. None
  164. None
  165. None
  166. Prep is proportional to REWARD I accept that you lead

    a busy life and that finding time for full-on rehearsals can be very difficult. So how about this…?
  167. Opener X 10 10 run-throughs of your opening 30-60 seconds,

    twice a day, for a week.
  168. Closer
 X 20 20 run-throughs of your call to action,

    once a day at lunchtime, for a week.
  169. Mantra
 X 15 15 run-throughs of your Big Fat Hairy

    Point, scattered through the day, for a week.
  170. Respect
 for your
 audience Respect from 
 your audience You

    want attention, respect, and action from your audience? You’ll have to earn it.
  171. RESPECT 150 One number. One word.

  172. simple ≠ easy As I said at the beginning -

    no great intellectual leap required. Just sweat.
  173. Thagyewverramuch @Rowan_Manahan