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UXA2022 Day 2; Kerry Matheson and Catherine Gleeson- Slowing down to speed up: The accidental innovation

UXA2022 Day 2; Kerry Matheson and Catherine Gleeson- Slowing down to speed up: The accidental innovation

In a world where we are striving for increased velocity, greater productivity and better efficiency we talk about the unexpected Value we produced through the process of stretching our design sprint over 5 weeks instead of a single day.

We’ll talk about how we seeded a design thinking model which encouraged a deeper understanding of our most vulnerable members while generating a cultural shift into collegial cross-team collaboration.

You’ll not only get an insight into the value pockets we extracted, but also gain insights into a practical format to run your own design thinking sprint.

We’ll share the insights we gained along the way as well as a practical format to run your own design thinking sprint.

uxaustralia
PRO

August 26, 2022
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  1. Note that this is an unedited transcript of a live event and therefore may contain errors. This transcript
    is the joint property of CaptionsLIVE and the authorised party responsible for payment and may not be
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    www.captionslive.com.au | [email protected] | 0447 904 255
    UX Australia
    UX Australia 2022
    Friday, 26 September 2022
    Captioned by: Carmel Downes & Kasey Allen

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    Page 47
    would like to share yours, we would love to hear them. We are always
    growing as well. Thank you so much, everyone, for having us here today
    and have a wonderful rest of the conference.
    STEVE BATY: Thank you. (APPLAUSE)
    STEVE BATY: There is a big speaker over there and I should not turn my
    microphone on standing in front of it. Apologies. That was super
    interesting, thanks Julie, Jennifer, Rebecca and Nika. That was super
    interesting. Our next talk is from Kerry and Catherine who will be talking
    through a case study of their innovation sprints that they have been
    implementing at their organisation, so without any further ado, I will hand
    over to Kerry and Catherine. Thank you. (APPLAUSE)
    CATHERINE GLEESON: Hi everyone. Kerry, how are you going there?
    KERRY MATHESON: Good. I don't know if you can hear or see me yet?
    CATHERINE GLEESON: I can hear you.
    STEVE BATY: We can hear you but we can't see you yet. I think that
    part is going to get switched over ...now. There we go.
    CATHERINE GLEESON: Oh, I can see me.
    KERRY MATHESON: Let's kick off.
    CATHERINE GLEESON: Today is about slowing down to speed up the
    Accidental Innovation but before we do that I'd just like to acknowledge

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    Page 48
    the traditional owners of country. So I'd like to pay my respects to the
    traditional owners on the land on which Catherine and I are speaking
    today, the Gadigal people of the Eora nation here in Sydney and pay our
    republics to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people here today along
    with elders, past, present and emerging.
    KERRY MATHESON: So today Catherine and I are here, my name is Kerry
    Matheson. I've been in the CX space for about 15 years now working
    across large telcos, financial services and most recently at Rest in super.
    But all of those roles I've had it is really the core is about making sure
    that the member or the customer is at the centre of everything that we
    do. Super excited to be here today presenting with Catherine Gleeson
    who is head of human-centred design at Rest Super. Hey Cath.
    CATHERINE GLEESON: Hey, super stoked to be with you too. I have
    been in this place a bit longer purely because I am a bit older - by no
    means better that is for sure. I have been a designer in digital from the
    90s onwards and did some very early touch screen work, designed
    education, co-funded under graduate program, designed gapes and my
    path has led to super and I have been in the financial insta sector for the
    past few years but the few things that Kez and I have in common is that
    desire to tell stories that advocate the change lives that celebrate that are
    truth telling whether it is a service design or story that is something we
    are incredibly passionate about. We are incredibly fortunate to be able to
    do that in our everyday job. I think Kez will now take you through what
    we did.
    KERRY MATHESON: In the next 20-25 minutes we will take you through
    what we did, how we did it and what we learnt from it.

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    Page 49
    So if we start with what we did, we started off with some very
    functional objectives and that was to teach some of our newer members
    in the team about human centred design and design thinking. We wanted
    to teach them those techniques so they could apply to it be more member
    centric than Rest is today. And to come up with tangible solutions for
    creating value for our members. We have a number of vulnerable
    member groups that we look at within Rest Super but we chose five to
    focus on and these included First Nations people, members suffering from
    mental health issues, members with a disability, members in financial
    distress or non-English speaking members or LOTE speakers in languages
    other than English. We chose those groups to align 50 par as the pans to
    so broke then up into 10 individual Banking Groups to start to build out a
    program where our staff could start to ideate and come up with ideas for
    those members. Catherine will go into - if you want to go into the next
    slide on how we tackled and approached this.
    CATHERINE GLEESON: We thought we have a lot of very busy people,
    they might be super enthusiastic but they are busy. So why don't we do
    a hakathony, one-day immersive workshop, a fantastic idea. I'm sure
    you are familiar with some of these technique, they a human-centred,
    design thinking and based on design print models. The idea is we dive
    deep into empathy and walk a mile or kilometre in the shoes of our
    personas. From that we start to see problems emerge which we convert
    into opportunities from which we ideate, define and by the end of the day
    we update the best once. That was a good idea but our good friend
    COVID came and ruined the party. There were no post-its, Sharpies or
    lollies for us. We were feeling glum about it. The idea of spending eight
    hours in front of a screen is not feasible. This is our second lockdown,
    people are feeling a little bit burnt out already and what we want do is

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    Page 50
    inspire and uplift them so what we did was we actually got the model and
    we extended it out to a five-week model. We had concerns about number
    one this is an opt-in thing, it is not compulsory for people to attend to so
    would they even come back? We have five weeks of it. We are thinking
    we will just run it up the flag pole and see. We stuck with the model. In
    week one we dived deep into empathy. We set up five Slack channels to
    do this and we also used digital white boards, our whiteboards are the
    equivalent for Miro familiar with that real time collaboration space, which
    would be most of you, I imagine. We had a bit of concern of how it would
    work.
    Week one, we empathised - we will go into more detail in following
    slides. Number 2, from that we started to see problems emerge from
    across the five cohorts and some of them actually we had a lot in
    common, they had a lot in common with each other and in week 3 we
    ideated and each of the workshops is about an hour-and-a-half long. It
    was quite rapid ideation which is why we were concerned. Week four we
    sketched those ideas, so really, really big into visual storytelling
    obviously. And then in week five we had a showcase and we've now got
    some of this work implemented and ongoing, which will also go into a
    little bit of detail later on. Okay. So week 1.
    KERRY MATHESON: Week 1 was about empathy mapping. I'm assuming
    you are all familiar with some of the common empathy mapping tools,
    think, feel, see. We had our staff broken up into five of the group, about
    10 in each group, broken out into the breakout groups within Microsoft
    Teams. They were all tasked with starting to empathise about their
    allocated segment that they were looking at and we started to see staff
    using some of their own knowledge and things like that to add to these
    empathy models but it was really just starting to scratch the surface. So

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    Page 51
    it was interesting as we then started to go into week 2 and what we
    started to see in between and we started to see some magic happen and
    what we started to see was something that we didn't realise that would
    happen by stretching out our sprints from being a single day into being
    over five weeks and I'm wondering if you know what that magic was, but
    I will reveal it to you now. Cath, if you go to the next slide, it was
    reflection. What we started to see by having that week in between doing
    the initial empathy mapping through to week two was the ideas and the
    content and the information that was being shared on the Slack channel.
    This whole program was voluntary for people to participate it was over
    and above their day jobs and we wanted to got give them homework to
    do after each session because we knew it was over and above their jobs
    but what we started to see was people sharing all sores of information on
    Slack relating to their segment and calling on all sores of different
    information to start to share and empathise. So after the first week we
    had about 50 articles that had been shared so that is one article per
    person that had been shared on the Slack groups. Here is an example of
    what some of the things were. In the top left-hand corner for example
    someone had popped in a slack chancel that they found this simulator to
    simulate what it would look like for someone with a vision impairment to
    be views content and what that would look like. Underneath that we have
    the we are 15 move. Which started to recognise with Rest's 1.8 million
    members there are a lot of our members who are actually impacted and
    actually probably vulnerable at any one point in time. In the bottom right
    we have played it forward which is a great example of where a very small
    idea had actually started to get some momentum across the community.
    And then in the top right - I love this example because this was really our
    staff putting themselves in the shoes of our non-English speaking
    members and thinking how would they go about accessing information if

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    Page 52
    they didn't speak English, so we put our website through Google's
    itranslate and you can see in Greek what this has come out looking like.
    It was just a great way to go wow, okay, this is the experience that our
    members would be having if we put ourselves in those shoes. Cath, do
    you want to add anything to that?
    CATHERINE GLEESON: I think what was exciting, and I think part of the
    reason they kept coming back is because they started to experience the
    power of building the knowledge base collectively and to actually be doing
    something bigger than themselves and to be part of a potentially seismic
    shift in terms of the way we think about the needs of our members and
    maybe certainly in the way that we work with each other. And in terms of
    that way we work with each other, in addition to that wonderful deep
    empathy that was happening, people weren't just dialling it in, they were
    posting at all hours of the day and night and weekend, were these
    communities that people started sharing not just the stuff they found but
    they started sharing lived experience of themselves, their friends, their
    families, and they got very, very passionate, sometimes really emotional,
    which is just wonderful because how else can we truly, truly be
    committed to changing the lives of people even in a small way unless
    were we are really prepared to feel it. So that was just an amazing,
    yeah, bonus, by-product. It was more than just forming teams but
    making communities. Have you got anything to add to that?
    KERRY MATHESON: Just the reflection, the enablement of time allowed
    that community to start to grow across the team. If you think we started
    off being very functional of being let's upskill them and get outcomes we
    can implement we were starting to see a movement amongst people that
    was far greater than that.

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    Page 53
    CATHERINE GLEESON: Deep thinking, time. By contrast, by the time we
    did week 3 we were ready for rapid ideation. This might seem a real
    contradiction. What happened was - in this instance I have an example
    from crazy 8s. If you haven't experienced or used it before, I would
    highly recommend it. It does seem a bit of a contradiction to do basically
    eight pictures in eight minutes or eight ideas in eight minutes but because
    of the deep thinking time, because of the reflection, there was this
    emergence of many, many strong ideas and it really worked. It was kind
    of like interval training, similar thing, thinking fast and slow, getting the
    heart beat up and then calming down and reflecting, getting the heart
    beat up. That is exactly what happened here. And then in week 4 what
    happened again was that we certainly we were really wanting to
    encourage people to visualise the process and the ideas so we had this
    pool of really, really strong ideas in each of the teams and we started to
    work individually and get teams to think - this again is something we
    hadn't really planned. We thought the ideas are so strong why don't we
    try and do some storytelling, really good storytelling. I come from a film
    education background so I was thinking let's do a classic structure,
    introduce the person, the problem, resolve it for them, happy ending.
    This is something that we had not rehearsed. Where I am thinking of
    themes where we are upvoting our ideas and put it into a structure Kerry
    took it upon herself to do a fantastic sketch in the structure and it was
    just brilliant. If we move on to the final output, which basically here is an
    example of what would become the cornerstone of the showcase for each
    keep, there's not really a huge amount of difference in terms of
    storytelling and content between what Kerry drew in a matter of seconds
    or minute and this thing that I kind of juched up a little bit. Have you got
    anything to add to that?

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    Page 54
    KERRY MATHESON: First of all, I can't draw, that is evidenced by the
    previous slide.
    CATHERINE GLEESON: Not true!
    KERRY MATHESON: So you don't need to draw. Catherine did juche this
    and the provide that came from each of the teams from seeing it in a
    more professional format that was presented to our executive leadership
    team was certainly once again over and above what we expected. I love
    this example that we have got here and this is from a non-English
    speaking stream. So we have an example of Shu who is an international
    student and starts a retail job and she signs up to Rest Super but if we go
    the Google Translate down on the left-hand corner she doesn't know who
    Rest is because she is knew to Australia and in our country she doesn't so
    superannuation. He pops into Google translate what is Rest Super,
    literally it means lying down and super means wonderful, so essentially a
    great lie down. I think this was such a aha moment, such a simple thing,
    because we were like, "Holy cow we need to make sure we are explaining
    what superannuation is and who Rest is in those first piece of
    communication that we give to our members because otherwise they will
    not know who we are." So it was something as simple as that going back
    to the Slack channel where we were sharing the translate and now we've
    actually gone to be the service design that we are just like wow, we need
    to actually add these other components into what we're doing. In we do
    that the ideal model would be that Shu who start a job and sign up to rest
    and tick a box that indicates what her first language is and receive that
    proposition material and explanation in her first piece of communication
    from us and then that could take her through to a translated page, she

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    Page 55
    could choose an Avatar that she felt she aligned to and then she would go
    on to see what is a very simple graph call representation of what the
    super journey is so that she could therefore feel more comfortable. It
    was really an ideal state using and calling on some of that deep empathy
    and sharing that we saw in some of the earlier weeks and then
    throughout all of the five weeks of the program.
    CATHERINE GLEESON: Definitely I think the outcomes were vastly
    different at this end, at this stage, in terms of what we could have
    achieved if we had just done a one-day model. So keeping in mind it is
    virtually the same number of hours face to face. But, I guess, the
    question is we all - I think it is common practice for us to visualise things
    and I'm sure it's more than just a feel-good thing and I'm sure some of
    you are going to be familiar with some of the signs I am going to share in
    the next slide. I will take us through what is the power of visual thinking.
    So basically, here's some fantastically solid science based on
    thousands of studies all around the world. So 90% of the information
    transmitted to our brains is visual versus the 10% but fascinatingly
    basically when we process visual material 60,000 times faster than text
    and we remember at least 80% of what we have seen and done. Here is
    the real clincher, after three days we retain 10% to 20% written or
    spoken versus 65%. It enters the long-term memory and tends to stay
    there whereas written, spoken material tends to evaporate - written in
    particular - and we can recall that from our long-term memory any time
    virtually. It stays there for a very long time, if not forever. The act of
    either receiving or creating visual material means that we remember
    things for much, much longer. Also when you think about the evolution of
    our brains and when you also think about the old slipping culture on the
    earth which is Aboriginal and TI culture in this country there is a reason

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    Page 56
    why culturally there is basically - it's underpinned by a visual culture
    because that's the way our brains work. I am really passionate about this
    and would be happy to talk to anyone about this for any length of time.
    Have you got anything to add to that, Kez?
    KERRY MATHESON: No, just that you have done an amazing job of
    visualising this whole presentation and we have done that so 65% of it
    will be retained in the next three days so we are hoping that ...the fourth
    accidental innovation that we found was less about the outputs of the
    program and more about the workings and the operationalisation of the
    program. So having the five weeks and the time to reflect in between, it
    sounds obvious, but it did allow us time to improve how we were
    delivering each of the sessions. Through a simple surface at the end of
    each session we get feedback from people which was super important
    because they were all participating over and above their day jobs. So we
    will refine with some of the incremental refinements we did was helping
    with better facilitation prior to the session for the team leaders, helping
    with some extra sticky notes pre-populated or pre-placed on the digital
    white board so people didn't have to create them from scratch. So doing
    that process improvement was also another accidental innovation that fell
    out of this program. I'm just looking on the chat, if you go to the next
    slide. What our participants said. So the participants - the questions in
    the chat, the participants were people from the member engagement
    team, so essentially the consumer marketing team of which there were
    50. We allocated them regularly into the sub-segments because if you
    remember back to the start it was going to be quite a functional let's just
    teach them some skills and hopefully we will get some outcomes. I think
    if we were to do it again we would involve more members earlier in the
    process. We did involve some Indigenous and vision-impaired members

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    Page 57
    towards the end so validate some of our thinking but essentially it was
    quite a functional start to the program of let's just like let's just divide
    people up into five groups and allocate a team leader. What we saw - I
    won't go through all the comments here - but even after this finished they
    wanted to keep going and keep doing. Even still today I have some of the
    participants coming up to me and asking to be involved in, for example,
    our Indigenous wrap that we are working on on some of the
    vision-impaired pieces we are doing. It is amazing that this five-week
    one-and-a-half hours per week has created this movement of people just
    wanting to be engaged.
    I am conscious of time so I will flip to the next slide. This is a great
    example of where we had some small innovations that came out and
    some large ones. This is some accessibility features we have just added
    to our website. This is the first version that's just launched last week.
    You will see in the first picture there the little wheelchair symbol and that
    takes you through to a screen where you can then go and start to select
    committee your vision options. So we have ADHD friendly
    vision-impaired profile, cognitive disability et cetera. The ADHD ones
    changes the contrast of the screen so that you're focussed on the right
    things and then you can see the investment screen on the right changing
    some of the colour contrast et cetera. So if you go to the rest.com.au
    website you will see that there and can have a play with some of the
    features this. Is an example of a big one that has fallen out of the
    program.
    CATHERINE GLEESON: Another big one for us is a host of little ones,
    another big one is that we are incredibly proud to have embarked on our
    journey to reconciliation and we are on the journey for our first
    reconciliation action program with reconciliation Australia and partners

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    Page 58
    that we already had but those - these two things were catalysed by these
    workshops. So that is something we're incredibly proud of. We went
    from being, as Kerry said, quite a functional let's train some people up to
    having real results and a whole backlog of work now that the entire
    organisation is committed to, which is just fantastic.
    So just moving on, we only have a couple of minutes left, if we in
    summary look at the things that we achieved, certainly we were hoping
    for some empathy but we had empathy in spades and a much deeper
    connection with our members than we could have anticipated at the start
    of the program, plus this development of communities and the
    relationships across our team, people who had never worked together.
    Because Rest itself is in a process of transformation so to have this
    de-siloing and these cross-functional teams emerging is just fantastic.
    And innovation, we hoped for that but we got a really strong foundation
    for innovation. We also have ways of doing things that we can keep
    recalibrating on but ways of finding things - you know, ways to do better
    things and maybe even new things along with the service model which we
    weren't planning necessarily to do but this culture of visual
    communication, virtual story telling is something that we are trying to roll
    out across the board as well and as Kerry mentioned processing and
    keeping ourselves honest, keeping everybody honest.
    KERRY MATHESON: So I guess our advice is if you are wanting to do this
    yourself, what is our advice. You've noticed the theme here which is
    reflection was the innovation so just keep in mind that innovation is not a
    linear process, don't under estimate the power of time in billing those
    relationships but most importantly pivoting to better outcomes. The fact
    that we injected that element of time meant that we could stop, reflect,

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    Page 59
    pivot, stop, reflect, pivot and we shimmied our way into a really great
    outcome by doing that pivoting along the way. So thank you very much
    for your time and for listening. I can see there are a couple of questions
    in the Q&A, I'm not sure if we answer them now or answer them online.
    Just let us know, I think, Steve.
    STEVE BATY: Thank you both very much. (APPLAUSE) Let me just
    check. We have one minute, do you want to pick a question and answer
    it. I think there is one from Jo there about how to start those
    conversations around burn out, mental health, if you have any advice
    about how to start or make space for those conversations to take place?
    KERRY MATHESON: So in terms of work burn out in the virtual world, I
    don't have any tips on how to do that but I guess in terms of burn out,
    one of the streams that we did have was around mental health and
    looking at how we can do different things for our members there and so
    some of the conversation and some of the finds in there was trying to
    support this holistically with different programs, it is really hard to identify
    who our members are who sometimes have a non-visible disability or
    vulnerability. So how do we start to approach things to be a bit more
    inclusive across everything. The other thing that we noticed was that
    things that came up as opportunities in one stream were often
    opportunities in another stream so trying to see how there were learnings
    for those different things. I don't think I've answered your question
    exactly but...
    CATHERINE GLEESON: I think it all - it depends if you are talking about
    the burn out of members or burn out of ourselves or our vendors.
    Certainly in terms of if we are member focussed in this point in time, if

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    Page 60
    that is where the conversation, is simple things like language, just
    language that's conversational. They are in our brand guidelines anyway
    but constantly doing a sense check and saying if I am a person who is
    experiencing burn out, any kind of distress, what am I going to respond
    to. I am probably going to respond to visuals first of all and then I will
    respond to kind, conversational words on paper. That was a really big
    thing for us too. I'm not sure whether that answers the question but,
    yeah.
    STEVE BATY: We'll accept that as your answers and appreciate it. Thank
    you very much. Please join me in thanks Kerry and Catherine. Have a
    great afternoon. (APPLAUSE)
    Our next talk is going to be here on stage. Rich Brophy will be
    presenting in person. Hi Rich. Make your way up.
    Please join me in welcoming Rich. He is from the NSW Department of
    Customer Service and will talk to us about death is best practice. Take it
    away.
    RICH BROPHY: Do you want to stand up and stretch before we talk about
    this. I don't want to be one of these people that says "Come on, all sing
    together". We could probably dance. It feels like a nightclub that the
    Romans designed. I am Rich, G'day. Talking about "Death to best
    practice". It is pretty cool, pretty edgy, right. When I first submitted the
    talk it was called improving design practice in medium to large
    organisations and I thought I am not going to that. "Death to best
    practice" a bit edgy and kind of fitting that I am dressed like a vicar as
    well. Ready to put this thing in the ground.
    I will start with the story because I have seen too many Ted talks. I
    had a job a couple of years ago, I joined a team whose work was basically

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