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Integrating Learning Portfolios in Foundation Curricula

Integrating Learning Portfolios in Foundation Curricula

Presented at the 2018 UT Dallas Office of Information Technology Summit. Details our first year of using learning portfolios in the classroom.

Cassini Nazir

May 16, 2018
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  1. Integrating
    Learning Portfolios
    in Foundation Curricula
    Cassini Nazir
    Clinical Associate Professor, 

    Director of Design, ArtSciLab
    Roxanne Minnish
    Clinical Assistant Professor
    Donna Aldridge
    Clinical Assistant Professor
    UT Dallas 

    Office of Information Technology Summit
    May 16, 2018

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  2. CHANGE DESIGN LEARNING
    Contextualizing the
    many curricular
    changes at UT Dallas
    Exploring the field of
    design as well as the
    design of curriculum
    Examining the
    portfolio and its
    relationship to actors
    TODAY’S TALK TAKES THREE SHAPES

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  3. CHANGE
    Contextualizing the
    many curricular
    changes at UT Dallas

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  4. 1600
    Students in ATEC
    foundation courses
    Fall 2017
    Undergraduate
    Pathways
    Students
    BA • MA • MFA • PhD
    4
    Student
    capstones
    Spring 2018
    200
    Undergraduate
    courses offered
    Fall 2017 to Spring 2018
    238
    Bachelors
    degrees awarded
    May 2018 graduation
    339
    647

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  5. Of the 122 undergraduate classes listed in the 2017 undergraduate catalog …
    Advanced Emerging Media
    Production
    Animation Studio I
    Animation Studio II
    Animation for Games
    Audience Analysis
    Audio Productions Lab I
    Audio Productions Lab II
    Audio Technologies
    Capstone Project
    Character Design
    Children and Media
    Code and Culture
    Communicating Social Science
    Communication and Social Science
    Theories
    Communication, Media, and
    Information Technology
    Computer Animation I
    Computer Animation II
    Computer Animation III
    Computer Animation Processes
    Computer Imaging
    Computer Modeling for Digital
    Fabrication
    Critical Making
    Design I
    Design II
    Design Research Methods
    Digital Activism
    Digital Audio Processing
    Digital Content Design
    Digital Fabrication Studio I
    Digital Fabrication Studio II
    Digital Inequalities
    Digital Sculpting
    Digital Video Production I
    Digital Video Production II
    Digital Writing
    Disability, Technology, and Media
    Emerging Media Production
    Emerging Media and the Digital
    Economy
    Ethics in New Media, Technology,
    and Communication
    Exploration of Arts and Technology
    Feminism, Technology, and Media
    Freshman Seminar
    Game Design Fundamentals
    Game Design I
    Game Design II
    Game Design III
    Game Production Lab I
    Game Production Lab II
    Game Studies I
    Game Systems Design
    Games and Narrative I
    Games and Narrative II
    Historical Perspectives on Emerging
    Media
    History of Games
    Human Communication Online
    Independent Study in Arts and
    Technology
    Interaction Design I
    Interaction Design II
    Internet Studio I
    Internet Studio II
    Intervention Design and Testing
    Introduction to Technoculture
    Journalism in the Networked Age
    Level Design I
    Level Design II
    Lighting and Composition I
    Lighting and Composition II
    Media Archeology
    Media Psychology
    Media Structures, Regulations, and
    Policies
    Media and Communication Research
    Theories I
    Media and Communication Research
    Theories II
    Message Effects Research Design
    Modeling and Texturing I
    Modeling and Texturing II
    Motion Capture Animation
    Motion Graphics
    Motion Graphics II
    Networked Identities
    News and Public Opinion
    Persuasion and Digital Media
    Political Communication
    Pre-Production Design I
    Pre-Production Design II
    Privacy and Surveillance
    Procedural Animation
    Project Management for Arts and
    Technology I
    Project Management for Arts and
    Technology II
    Projection Mapping Studio
    Qualitative Communication Research
    Methods
    Queer Technology and Media
    Race, Technology, and Media
    Reading Media Critically
    Reading in a Networked Era
    Rigging I
    Rigging II
    Scripting for Games I
    Scripting for Games II
    Senior Honors in ATEC
    Senior Seminar
    Social Networks
    Sound Design
    Sound Design for Games and
    Interactive Media
    Special Effects
    Special Topics in Arts and
    Technology
    Storytelling for New Media I
    Storytelling for New Media II
    Strategic Design
    Survey of Digital Fabrication
    Theories EMAC
    Tools Development for Arts and
    Technology
    Topics in Animation
    Topics in Art and Technology
    Topics in Emerging Media and
    Communications
    Topics in Game Development
    Topics in Mediated Communication
    Topics in Sound Design
    User Experience Design for Games I
    Virtual Environments
    Virtual Environments II
    World Building
    Writing and Research EMAC

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  6. Advanced Emerging Media
    Production
    Animation Studio I
    Animation Studio II
    Animation for Games
    Audience Analysis
    Audio Productions Lab I
    Audio Productions Lab II
    Audio Technologies
    Capstone Project
    Character Design
    Children and Media
    Code and Culture
    Communicating Social Science
    Communication and Social Science
    Theories
    Communication, Media, and
    Information Technology
    Computer Animation I
    Computer Animation II
    Computer Animation III
    Computer Animation Processes
    Computer Imaging
    Computer Modeling for Digital
    Fabrication
    Critical Making
    Design I
    Design II
    Design Research Methods
    Digital Activism
    Digital Audio Processing
    Digital Content Design
    Digital Fabrication Studio I
    Digital Fabrication Studio II
    Digital Inequalities
    Digital Sculpting
    Digital Video Production I
    Digital Video Production II
    Digital Writing
    Disability, Technology, and Media
    Emerging Media Production
    Emerging Media and the Digital
    Economy
    Ethics in New Media, Technology,
    and Communication
    Exploration of Arts and Technology
    Feminism, Technology, and Media
    Freshman Seminar
    Game Design Fundamentals
    Game Design I
    Game Design II
    Game Design III
    Game Production Lab I
    Game Production Lab II
    Game Studies I
    Game Systems Design
    Games and Narrative I
    Games and Narrative II
    Historical Perspectives on Emerging
    Media
    History of Games
    Human Communication Online
    Independent Study in Arts and
    Technology
    Interaction Design I
    Interaction Design II
    Internet Studio I
    Internet Studio II
    Intervention Design and Testing
    Introduction to Technoculture
    Journalism in the Networked Age
    Level Design I
    Level Design II
    Lighting and Composition I
    Lighting and Composition II
    Media Archeology
    Media Psychology
    Media Structures, Regulations, and
    Policies
    Media and Communication Research
    Theories I
    Media and Communication Research
    Theories II
    Message Effects Research Design
    Modeling and Texturing I
    Modeling and Texturing II
    Motion Capture Animation
    Motion Graphics
    Motion Graphics II
    Networked Identities
    News and Public Opinion
    Persuasion and Digital Media
    Political Communication
    Pre-Production Design I
    Pre-Production Design II
    Privacy and Surveillance
    Procedural Animation
    Project Management for Arts and
    Technology I
    Project Management for Arts and
    Technology II
    Projection Mapping Studio
    Qualitative Communication Research
    Methods
    Queer Technology and Media
    Race, Technology, and Media
    Reading Media Critically
    Reading in a Networked Era
    Rigging I
    Rigging II
    Scripting for Games I
    Scripting for Games II
    Senior Honors in ATEC
    Senior Seminar
    Social Networks
    Sound Design
    Sound Design for Games and
    Interactive Media
    Special Effects
    Special Topics in Arts and
    Technology
    Storytelling for New Media I
    Storytelling for New Media II
    Strategic Design
    Survey of Digital Fabrication
    Theories EMAC
    Tools Development for Arts and
    Technology
    Topics in Animation
    Topics in Art and Technology
    Topics in Emerging Media and
    Communications
    Topics in Game Development
    Topics in Mediated Communication
    Topics in Sound Design
    User Experience Design for Games I
    Virtual Environments
    Virtual Environments II
    World Building
    Writing and Research EMAC
    Of the 122 undergraduate classes listed in the 2017 undergraduate catalog,

    almost a third are new courses.

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  7. ATCM 2302
    Design I
    Provides foundational knowledge of visual structure
    and problem solving in two- and three-dimensional
    design. Students will be introduced to design
    methodology and design processes with emphasis
    on the formal principles of composition and
    organization.
    PREREQ —
    ATCM 3365
    Game Design I
    This course presents principles and techniques of
    interactive game design, including but not limited
    to game mechanics, player dynamics, social and
    multiplayer structures, statistics and game theory,
    and systems analysis. Students will work individually
    and in teams to create original interactive games as
    well as learn fundamentals of focus testing, usability
    testing, and critique. Course focuses on both analog
    and digital games.
    PREREQ —
    ATCM 2365 Game Design Fundamentals
    ATCM 3305
    Computer Animation I
    This course presents the concepts, tools and
    techniques used in 3D key frame animation. Topics
    will include squash and stretch, anticipation,
    overlapping motion and timing. Students will learn to
    animate using pre-existing rigs and set-ups.
    PREREQ —
    ATCM 2305 Computer Animation Processes
    ATCM 2365 Game Design Fundamentals
    A summer workshop helped faculty better understand the curriculum changes.

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  8. Faculty mapped the student journey from start to finish.

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  9. By the time they entered school, laptops were outselling desktops.
    They have always been searching for Pokemon.
    As toddlers they may have dined on some of that canned food hoarded in case of Y2K.
    Wikipedia has steadily gained acceptance by their teachers.
    First generation for whom a “phone” has been primarily a video game, direction finder, electronic telegraph, and research library.
    Electronic signatures have always been as legally binding as the pen-on-paper kind.
    2017 marks the last freshman class born in the 1990s.
    From https://www.beloit.edu/mindset/2021

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  10. HIGH
    LOW
    ARTIFACTS TRANSFORMATIONS
    COMPLEXITY
    EXPERIENCES
    THOUGHTS
    ACTION
    THINGS
    SYMBOLS
    Logos, signs Tools, objects Interactions, services Ecosystems, platforms
    Buchanan, R. (2001) Design research and the new learning. Design Issues, 17(4), 3–23
    The field of design is changing.
    Buchanan’s four orders of design (2001) demonstrates the field’s past and possible futures.

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  11. 20th century design
    FROM
    Making the complex manageable;
    Rendering the complicated meaningful.
    Simplicity of form, function,
    materials, and manner.
    TO
    21st century design
    THOUGHTS
    ACTION
    THINGS
    SYMBOLS
    Logos, signs Tools, objects Interactions, services Ecosystems, platforms
    Buchanan, R. (2001) Design research and the new learning. Design Issues, 17(4), 3–23
    Design of systems

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  12. 20th century design
    FROM
    Making the complex manageable;
    Rendering the complicated meaningful.
    Simplicity of form, function,
    materials, and manner.
    TO
    21st century design
    Design a vase. Design a way for people to enjoy
    flowers inside their home.
    Design a way for people
    to connect with nature.

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  13. DESIGN
    Exploring the field of
    design as well as the
    design of curriculum

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  14. 1 FOUNDATIONS
    3 SIGNATURE WORK
    Based on National Association of Schools of Art and Design Creative Multidisciplinary Converge and Technologies, see https://nasad.arts-accredit.org
    Based on Association of American College’s & Universities publications on Signature Work, see https://www.aacu.org/signaturework
    2 PATHWAY
    Capstone
    Internship
    Field work
    Research
    Community-based projects
    Pathway foundations
    Thematic clusters
    Three or more courses
    across multiple
    disciplines, including
    the major field.
    A student examines
    questions important to
    him/her and to society.
    Studio Practice
    History Theory
    Technology
    Synthesis
    The undergraduate student journey is a process of guided exploration and refinement.
    Four possible in ATEC:
    Animation, game design,
    design and production and
    mediated communication.

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  15. 1 FOUNDATIONS
    2 PATHWAY
    3 SIGNATURE WORK
    Capstone
    Internship
    Field work
    Research
    Community-based projects
    Pathway foundations
    Thematic clusters
    Three or more courses
    across multiple
    disciplines, including
    the major field.
    A student examines
    questions important to
    him/her and to society.
    messy
    <
    Studio Practice
    History Theory
    Technology
    Synthesis
    Based on National Association of Schools of Art and Design Creative Multidisciplinary Converge and Technologies, see https://nasad.arts-accredit.org
    Based on Association of American College’s & Universities publications on Signature Work, see https://www.aacu.org/signaturework
    The undergraduate student journey is a process of guided exploration and refinement.
    Learning portfolios can weave the thread of reflection through their experience.
    Four possible in ATEC:
    Animation, game design,
    design and production and
    mediated communication.

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  16. ATCM 2300 

    Introduction to Technoculture
    ATCM 2301 

    Computer Imaging
    ATCM 2302 

    Design I
    CE 1335

    Computer Science I
    for non-majors
    1 FOUNDATIONS
    a ATEC B PATHWAY
    ATCM 1316 

    Drawing Foundations
    ATCM 2305 

    Computer Animation Processes
    ATCM 2303 

    Project Management I
    CE 2335

    Computer Science II
    for non-majors
    Every student in the
    school takes these
    Students seeking entrance
    in the pathway take these
    ANIMATION
    Electronic
    Learning
    Portfolios
    in these class

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  17. Portfolios take many forms:
    Showcase portfolios emphasize the products of learning.
    Growth portfolios emphasize the process of learning.
    Evaluation portfolios emphasize achievements.
    Adapted from http://jfmueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/toolbox/portfolios.htm
    EVALUATION
    Document achievement
    Document progress towards
    standards
    Place students appropriately
    SHOWCASE
    Usually includes final work
    Accomplishments
    Samples of best work
    Best or most important work
    Communicates current aptitudes
    GROWTH
    Can include early work
    Change over time
    Develops process skills such
    as self-evaluation and goal-
    setting
    Identify strengths and
    weaknesses
    Track the development of one
    more products/performances
    EARLY WORK MATURE WORK
    EXEMPLARY WORK
    A portfolio can tell
    more than one story
    to more than one audience

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  18. Game Code
    Presentation
    Image
    Media Prototype
    Paper Reflection
    Objects placed in the portfolios also take many forms:
    Documentation
    /Evidence
    Reflection Collaboration
    /Mentoring

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  19. Argyris, C. & Schon, D. (1978). Organizational Learning: A Theory of Action Perspective. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co.
    In-class exercises and assignments enable reflection-in-action (thinking “on your
    feet”) and knowing-in-action (using knowledge to take action in the moment).
    Are we doing things right?
    SINGLE LOOP LEARNING
    Reflection in Action
    ACTIONS RESULT

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  20. The learning portfolio enables reflection on action: why you did what you did and
    what you would do differently next time.
    Argyris, C. & Schon, D. (1978). Organizational Learning: A Theory of Action Perspective. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co.
    Are we doing the right things?
    Reflection on Action
    ASSUMPTIONS
    Are we doing things right?
    SINGLE LOOP LEARNING
    Reflection in Action
    ACTIONS RESULT
    DOUBLE LOOP LEARNING

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  21. CONTEXT
    TRIPLE-LOOP LEARNING
    How do we decide what is right?
    Extended use of learning portfolios enables triple-loop learning conversations,
    where students can connect larger contextual concerns.
    Argyris, C. & Schon, D. (1978). Organizational Learning: A Theory of Action Perspective. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co.
    Are we doing the right things?
    Reflection on Action
    ASSUMPTIONS
    Are we doing things right?
    SINGLE LOOP LEARNING
    Reflection in Action
    ACTIONS RESULT
    DOUBLE LOOP LEARNING

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  22. Criteria for selecting a vendor for Electronic Learning Portfolios can be helpful …
    Posey, L. et al. (2015) Developing a Pathway for an Institution Wide ePortfolio Program. International Journal of ePortfolio, 5(1), 75–92.
    Design + Ease of Use
    Overall ease of use in creating an e-Porfolio.
    Ease of uploading files
    Supported file types
    How externally created, text based content is displayed;
    readability of on-screen written work.
    Viewing and commenting features.
    Image editing features.
    File size limits for artifacts.
    Integration with online content hosting sites.
    Ability to write and create content/artifacts from the ePortfolio.
    Access
    Ability for student to create and keep multiple versions.
    Ability for department to keep time-stamped versions.
    Student access and maintenance of portfolios after graduation.
    Institution access to alumni portfolios.
    Archive features.
    Privacy
    Student control of public access.
    Ability to lock down/hide sections or individual artifacts.
    Ability to customize views for different audiences.
    Ability to work privately and hide content from all parties,
    including instructor.
    Web 1.0 and 2.0 sharing of portfolios.
    Internal/public commenting features & controls.
    Collaborative editing features.
    Accessibility
    Accessibility of the portfolio’s UI.
    Accessibility of user created content in the portfolio.
    Accessibility of artifacts in the portfolio.
    Adherence to accessibility standards.
    Accreditation
    Supports evidence of student achievement for accreditation.
    Ability to create customized reports based on variables.
    Ability to export complete ePortfolios and components of
    ePortfolios for accreditor to review.
    Ability to export all student instances of a single assignment.
    Competency tagging features.
    Support for long-term archives.
    Support
    Technical support for students.
    Technical support for instructors.
    Live support (e.g., online, on-site, phone).
    “Self-help” (documentation, blogs, etc.).
    Dedicated “shared space” for portfolio templates, advice, model
    portfolios, etc. (for use by administrators).
    Integration of ePortfolio support w other institutional tech support.
    End product
    Diverse examples of “finished portfolios” created by product.
    Aesthetics: examples of great visual design with the product.
    Nav: examples of great user experience designed with the product.
    Ability for institutions to “curate” portfolios for viewing by
    prospective students, faculty and the general public.
    Writing Features
    Writing/editing features.
    Instructor & peer feedback features.
    In-line editing features.
    Ability to keep multiple versions of writing assignment including
    instructor feedback & revisions.
    Ability for multiple instructors to comment on the same piece.
    Sophisticated content authoring and feedback mechanics.
    Instructor Features
    Instructor commenting & feedback on externally created artifacts.
    Portfolio & assignment templates.
    Assignment creation & monitoring.
    Ability for multiple instructors to comment on the same artifact.
    Artifact versioning features.
    Batch loading of assessment data (e.g., exam scores) into
    individual portfolios. Program-level/multi-year portfolio capabilities
    & student access features.
    Competency tracking features.
    Systems Integration
    Student account creation & authentication features
    Integration with enterprise systems (e.g. Banner)
    Integration with LMS (e.g., Blackboard) & grade center.
    Student access mechanisms (within and/or outside of courses).
    Well-developed APIs.
    Integration with LMS Grade Center.
    How does your system integrate with the Grade Center in Bb?
    Portability among LMSs in case of transition.
    Content export functionality.
    iOS friendly.

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  23. … but is usually decided by the sunk costs of current systems and infrastructure.
    Privacy
    Design +
    Ease of Use Access
    Writing
    Features
    Instructor
    Features
    Systems
    Integration Accessibility Accredit’n Support End product
    Blackboard
    eLearning
    WordPress
    Multisite
    TBD
    ?

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  24. DESIGN
    The undergraduate student journey is a process of 

    guided exploration and refinement.
    Portfolios can take many forms: 

    growth, evaluation, and showcase.
    Learning portfolios enable reflection and collaboration,
    not just documentation of work.
    Over time that reflection can affords students 

    the ability to see larger threads and contextual changes.

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  25. LEARNING
    Examining the
    portfolio deeper

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  26. The design studio is different from most classrooms.

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  27. Students are learning how to use form to shape meaning.

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  28. Design is a process of understanding, planning, visualizing, observing, and iterating.

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  29. Creative thinking is chaotic, requiring continuous exploration and intuitive leaps.

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  30. Foundational principles of design help students tame chaos into order.

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  31. Students create a number of artifacts demonstrating an understanding of design principles.

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  32. Students are challenged to make their understanding manifest as co-creators of knowledge.

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  33. Design is social in nature. Showing work-in-progress is important.

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  34. Getting feedback on work-in-progress is critical.

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  35. Students reflect on what they created and whether it adheres to the design criteria.

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  36. Raw talent is not enough to be a good designer.

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  37. The Learning Portfolio

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  38. After this class, I’ve become
    a lot more conscious about
    my design decisions, even in
    the other design classes that
    I took also during this
    semester.
    It was really cool for me to
    physically see the progress
    I was making throughout
    the class, and how I was
    growing as a designer.
    With [the design process]
    I can now understand how
    to look back on and
    improve a design. This
    also helps me get started
    with a design and how to
    go about finishing one.
    I grew over the course by
    learning to disconnect
    from my work and that
    criticism of my work is not
    a criticism of me.
    When we weren’t allowed to
    use color (something I
    always incorporate in my
    work) it was difficult to think
    of how to convey different
    moods until I learned
    rhythm.
    I think I have become a
    better designer overall.
    Now I think about designing
    things differently. I also
    critique existing designs
    more often than I used to.
    Student feedback in their own words …

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  39. Not all work is excellent.

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  40. I have two focal points of the orchids
    and the jeep stamp. In Colombia,
    there is a variety of exotic flowers with
    orchids being the most prominent.
    As for the jeep, they are called yipaos
    or willy jeeps and are seen in rural
    streets of Colombia.
    To distinguish the two, I purposely
    made the orchids more detailed in
    color while the stamp is bold with a
    solid color but also detailed with a lot
    of lines, showing a silhouette of some
    objects that would be on a yipao.

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  41. View video at vimeo.com/246519851/a1f5a58383.

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