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Agile and Scrum

Agile and Scrum

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Davide Fucci

June 19, 2014
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  1. Agile and SCRUM Agile Project Management, Methods and Principle

  2. Traditional software development process Design Implementation Testing Deployment Maintenance Requirements

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/hamed/462658709/
  3. Design Implementation Testing Deployment Maintenance Requirements Not clear Subject to

    changes
  4. Design Implementation Testing Deployment Maintenance Requirements Takes too long Not

    clear Subject to changes
  5. Design Implementation Testing Deployment Maintenance Requirements Not clear Subject to

    changes Takes too long Not enough time
  6. Design Implementation Testing Deployment Maintenance Requirements Not clear Subject to

    changes Takes too long Not enough time Over costly
  7. Agile Manifesto (2001) Individuals and interactions vs. Processes and tools

    Working software vs. Comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration vs. Contract negotiation Responding to change vs. Following processes and tools http://www.flickr.com/photos/30199512@N06/4540660002/
  8. SCRUM “An agile software development project managment toolkit” by J.

    Sutherland, K. Schwaber, M. Beedle & M. Cohn, 2001 http://www.flickr.com/photos/blind_beholder/5410176536/
  9. SCRUM (in a nutshell) ‣Roles • Product Owner • Scrum

    Master • Scrum team ‣Artifacts •Backlogs •User stories •Estimates ‣Sprint •Planning •Daily meeting •Review •Restrospective http://www.flickr.com/photos/xini/1521344420/
  10. Roles SCRUM Master Product Owner SCRUM Team Vision of the

    product Gives feedback Accepts / rejects results Manages user stories Estimates work Develops product Supports the team Safeguards for the process
  11. Product Backlogs Backlog: list of TO-DO that describes the product

    ‣High level requirements ‣Uncomplete ‣Subject to changes ‣Short term (Marchenko, A.) ‣Features ‣Bugs ‣Technical work ‣Knowledge acquisition (Cohn, M.)
  12. Agile Requirements Elicitation • Face-to-face communication ‣ Use of User

    Stories • Iterative ‣ Continued during each development cycle • Enforce prioritization ‣ Captures customer business value from the start • High-level prototyping ‣ Early customer feedback
  13. User Stories “Something the user wants” (M. Cohn) Text on

    a piece of paper (e.g. 8x13cm), usually in the format As an <actor> I want <action> so that <achievement> Owner <your name> Priority <Low/medium/high> Who is using the features What will happen but not how What is the purpose of the feature
  14. User Stories “Something the user wants” (M. Cohn) Text on

    a piece of paper (e.g. 8x13cm), usually in the format As an <actor> I want <action> so that <achievement> Owner <your name> Priority <Low/medium/high> As a non-admin user, I want to login in WebOodi so that I check the time for classes.
  15. Epic User Stories A big user story that can be

    splitted into two or more Split it: ‣Across data boundaries ‣On operational boundaries ‣Isolate things in common ‣DO NOT split into tasks Consider combining stories
  16. Agile Estimation How long will it take for a User

    Story to be done*? Techniques: •Expert opinion •Analogy ‣Estimates based on relative to those already estimated •Disaggreation ‣Split into smaller, easier to estimate pieces •Good enough
  17. Planning Poker (Grenning, 2002) •Combination of techniques •Use a deck

    of cards with different numbers ‣Same order of magnitude. (e.g. 0,1,2,3,5,8,13,20,40,100) •The “dealer” (e.g. Scrum Master) reads the user story •User story is discussed and possible question answered (e.g. by the Product Owner) http://www.flickr.com/photos/beermugdk/2512266404/
  18. •Each “player” privately selects a card representing his/ her estimation

    for the user story •Once everybody is ready, the cards are turned face-up •If estimates differs, the low and high estimators explain their estimates •Repeat until consensus is reached Online Planning Poker tool http://www.planningpoker.com/ Planning Poker (Grenning, 2002) http://www.flickr.com/photos/beermugdk/2512266404/
  19. Sprint Product backlogs Sprint backlogs Sprint Daily Meeting Deliverables http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Scrum_process.svg

  20. Sprint Product backlogs Sprint backlogs Sprint Daily Meeting Deliverables Timeboxed

    iteration 2-3 weeks Max 15 mins Working software http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Scrum_process.svg
  21. ‣ Plan the strategy ‣ Define the sprint backlog items

    ‣ Estimate the sprint backlog items ‣ Team & Scrum Master ‣ What did I do? ‣ Did I have any problems? ‣ What will I do? ‣ Team only Planning Meeting Daily Meeting Sprint Review ‣ Show completed features ‣ Results accepted or rejected ‣ Everybody, including the Product Owner Sprint Retrospective ‣ What start doing ‣ What stop doing ‣ What continue doing ‣ Team & Scrum Master Sprint phases
  22. Communication is fundamental for SCRUM Challenge: apply it in a

    (simulated) global environment Try it if you want, but don’t get stucked in it!
  23. Resources Agile Estimating and Planning. - M. Cohn, Prentice Hall,

    NJ. 2006 http://www.mountaingoatsoftware.com/scrum/product-backlog http://blog.mountaingoatsoftware.com/tag/user-stories http://www.scrumalliance.org/articles/87-writing-the-product-backlog-just-enough