Default to Open

Default to Open

My keynote at EclipseCon 2018 - https://www.eclipsecon.org/europe2018/keynotes.

75935a034e6c04dfd6f6946a299c3937?s=128

Harish Pillay

October 25, 2018
Tweet

Transcript

  1. Insights on Open Source From a 25 Year Old Company

    Harish Pillay Head, Community Architecture and Leadership @harishpillay • hpillay@redhat.com
  2. What Happens When You Default to Open Harish Pillay Head,

    Community Architecture and Leadership @harishpillay • hpillay@redhat.com
  3. A 6 act talk

  4. <act 0>

  5. “Look at your fish” * * apologies to Samuel Scudder

    - http://grammar.about.com/od/classicessays/a/Look-At-Your-Fish-By-Samuel-H-Scudder.htm
  6. Haemulon CC BY Brian Gratwicke https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haemulon#/media/File:Haemulon_flavolineatum_French_grunt.jpg

  7. Samuel Hubbard Scudder https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/ File:Samuel_Hubbard_Scudder_1837-1911.jpg#/ media/File:Samuel_Hubbard_Scudder_1837-1911.jpg Professor Louis Agassiz https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Agassiz

  8. “No man is fit to be a naturalist, who does

    not know how to take care of specimens.” - Prof Agassiz as remembered by Samuel Scudder
  9. Haemulon CC BY Brian Gratwicke https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haemulon#/media/File:Haemulon_flavolineatum_French_grunt.jpg

  10. </act 0>

  11. <act 1>

  12. “Look at your fish” * * apologies to Samuel Scudder

    - http://grammar.about.com/od/classicessays/a/Look-At-Your-Fish-By-Samuel-H-Scudder.htm
  13. code “Look at your fish” * * apologies to Samuel

    Scudder - http://grammar.about.com/od/classicessays/a/Look-At-Your-Fish-By-Samuel-H-Scudder.htm
  14. 14 Why Code?

  15. 15 Why Open?

  16. 16 Really, why?

  17. 17

  18. 18 Instead of “Why Software FAILS”, this could have read,

    “Why Software Projects Fail” https://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/software/why-software-fails September 2005
  19. 19 That Sept 2005 IEEE Spectrum article suggests that there

    are 12 common factors why software projects fail
  20. 20 https://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/software/why-software-fails September 2005 12 most common factors: • 1.

    Unrealistic or unarticulated project goals 2. Inaccurate estimates of needed resources 3. Badly defined system requirements 4. Poor reporting of the project’s status 5. Unmanaged risks 6. Poor communication among customers, developers, and users 7. Use of immature technology 8. Inability to handle the project’s complexity 9. Sloppy development practices 10. Poor project management 11. Stakeholder politics 12. Commercial pressures Why do software projects fail so often?
  21. 21 Are those failures because of code?

  22. 22 https://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/software/why-software-fails September 2005 12 most common factors: • 1.

    Unrealistic or unarticulated project goals 2. Inaccurate estimates of needed resources 3. Badly defined system requirements 4. Poor reporting of the project’s status 5. Unmanaged risks 6. Poor communication among customers, developers, and users 7. Use of immature technology 8. Inability to handle the project’s complexity 9. Sloppy development practices 10. Poor project management 11. Stakeholder politics 12. Commercial pressures Why do software projects fail so often?
  23. 23 Or is it because of failure to collaborate?

  24. 24 Instead of “Why Software FAILS”, this could have read,

    “Why Projects Fail” https://spectrum.ieee.org/computing/software/why-software-fails September 2005
  25. </act 1>

  26. <act 2>

  27. 27 “My code repo is mine, and your repo is

    yours!”
  28. 28 THE OPEN SOURCE WAY

  29. 29 Create. Share. Collaborate. Rinse and Repeat! THE OPEN SOURCE

    WAY
  30. 30 Permissionless Innovation

  31. 31 Ask for forgiveness, not permission

  32. 32 https://investors.redhat.com/corporate-governance/governance-documents

  33. 33 “Participation in an open source project, whether maintained by

    the Company or by another commercial or non-commercial entity or organization, does not constitute a conflict of interest even where such participant makes a determination in the interest of the project that is adverse to the Company's interests.” * * Page 2, second last paragraph
  34. </act 2>

  35. <act 3>

  36. 36 How the Open Source Development Model Succeeded

  37. VERY BRIEF HISTORY OF FREE SOFTWARE

  38. 38 IOW, how did we get here?

  39. 39 1980-1984

  40. 40 Richard M Stallman (photo from 2014)

  41. 41 Xerox 9700 Laser Printer https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xerox_9700 http://www.oreilly.com/openbook/freedom/ch01.html “Free as in

    freedom” Richard Stallman’s Crusade for Free Software
  42. 42 GNU’s Not Unix

  43. 43 Established 4th October, 1985

  44. 44 FOUR FREEDOMS fsf.org Freedom 0: Free to use Anyone

    can use it, however they like. Freedom 1: Free to copy Anyone can get a copy for the cost of media. Freedom 2: Free to modify If I don’t like how it works, I can change it. Freedom 3: Free to distribute I can share my changes.
  45. 45 GNU PUBLIC LICENSE http://gnu.org Implements the four freedoms. -

    Use, copy, modify, distribute. Built SOLIDLY on copyright. - The author provides additional rights for additional responsibilities.
  46. 46 LINUX IS BORN From: torvalds@klaava.Helsinki.FI (Linus Benedict Torvalds) Newsgroups:

    comp.os.minix Subject: What would you like to see most in minix? Message-ID: <1991Aug25.205708.9541@klaava.Helsinki.FI> Date: 25 Aug 91 20:57:08 GMT Organization: University of Helsinki “I'm doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won't be big and professional like gnu) for 386(486) AT clones. This has been brewing since april, and is starting to get ready. I'd like any feedback on things people like/dislike in minix ...” https://tinyurl.com/arfweyo
  47. 47 http://catb.org/~esr/writings/homesteading/cathedral-bazaar/

  48. 48 “Open Source”1 is a marketing phrase coined2 by Christine

    Peterson3 in 1998 to make “free software” acceptable to newcomers and businesses 1 https://opensource.org/history 2 https://opensource.com/article/18/2/coining-term-open-source-software 3 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christine_Peterson
  49. 49 Open Source Initiative – opensource.org - was set up

    in 1998 to be an educational, advocacy, and stewardship organization around collaborative development.
  50. </act 3>

  51. <act 4>

  52. 52 LICENSING

  53. 53 LICENSING IS CRUCIAL Licensing creates the community. - It

    tells us how contributions are handled. Licensing determines the business model. - If you compel source redistribution, how do you build a business? Licensing should be easy. - If it’s too complicated, you lose contributors.
  54. 54 IT’S ALL ABOUT LICENSING! PERMISSIVE/ WEAK COPYLEFT BSD, MIT,

    Apache, Mozilla, Eclipse, LGPL STRONG COPYLEFT GPL AGPL EUPL Public Domain Non-protective Open Source Licenses Protective Open Source Licenses Proprietary Licenses Trade Secrets All rights relinquished All rights retained Rights in Copyright
  55. “Look at your fish” * * apologies to Samuel Scudder

    - http://grammar.about.com/od/classicessays/a/Look-At-Your-Fish-By-Samuel-H-Scudder.htm
  56. Haemulon CC BY Brian Gratwicke https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haemulon#/media/File:Haemulon_flavolineatum_French_grunt.jpg

  57. </act 4>

  58. <act 5>

  59. The Incredibly Fine Balance between Open Source Projects and Open

    Source Products
  60. What is an Open Source Project?

  61. • Idealism to solve a problem • No constraints –

    should it have a product roadmap? • No pain, no gain • Ask forgiveness, not permission • Permissionless innovation • Risk taking – no Product Requirements Document • Fail fast, fail early – learn, grow and evolve Some characteristics of a Project
  62. What is an Open Source Product?

  63. Characteristics of Products • Reduce risk – both yours and

    your customers • Constrained in that it needs to meet the customer requirements • UX/UI finesse • Scalability is important: how would you help the evolution of the product? • Branding: project name <> product name
  64. Projects and Products Need People

  65. What about People • Project people have a different motivations

    compared with Product people • The motivations of being in a project team is significantly different than being a product team • There may be overlaps, but it is few and far between
  66. Source Code License Community Free and Open Source Software

  67. None
  68. </act 5>

  69. <postscript>

  70. 70 Red Hat Linux 1996

  71. 71

  72. 72

  73. 73 Page 7 – Red Hat Linux User’s Guide 1996

  74. Fast forward a few years ...

  75. 75 COMMUNISTS Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, July 2000 http://www.theregister.co.uk/2000/07/31/ms_ballmer_linux_is_communism/ Image:

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/daviderickson/718933691 CC BY-SA 2.0
  76. 76 https://www.redhat.com/en/about/patent-promise

  77. 77 http://www.theregister.co.uk/2004/11/18/ballmer_linux_lawsuits/

  78. 11 years later ...

  79. 79 Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella January 2015 https://youtu.be/54hHr8ye2kE

  80. 15 days ago, on 10/10/18, Microsoft joins the Open Invention

    Network - making more than 60,000 software patents available to all in the Linux & open source ecosystems at no cost and in perpetuity!
  81. </postscript>

  82. Comments? Harish Pillay hpillay@redhat.com @harishpillay, 9V1HP Open Unlocks The World’s

    Potential Photo taken 22 Oct 2018 at Red Hat Singapore pantry