People, not process (for UX Romandie meets COMEM+)

D71bccbd79573bee69223e5501789221?s=47 Ian Fenn
February 26, 2013

People, not process (for UX Romandie meets COMEM+)

Some deletions and additions since previous versions. In particular, the addition of work by Clifford Nass.

D71bccbd79573bee69223e5501789221?s=128

Ian Fenn

February 26, 2013
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Transcript

  1. 8.
  2. 10.
  3. 14.

    A designer solves problems they often have to help identify

    within a set of ever-changing constraints. Ian Fenn
  4. 15.

    A designer solves problems they often have to help identify

    within a set of ever-changing constraints. Without authority. Ian Fenn
  5. 16.

    THE EXPECTATIONS PYRAMID Succeeding the Project Management Jungle (Doug Russell)

    http://www.amazon.com/Succeeding-Project-Management-Jungle-Projects/dp/0814416152/
  6. 17.

    ๏ enthusiasm ๏ total confusion ๏ disillusionment ๏ search for

    the guilty ๏ punishment of the innocent ๏ reward and promotion of the non-participants THE SIX PROJECT PHASES
  7. 20.

    ARRIVE ARMED WITH KNOWLEDGE ๏ Read the usual suspects -

    Jared Spool, Jakob Nielsen, Johnny Holland, Boxes and arrows, UX magazine... ๏ Familiarize yourself with the high traffic websites that people visit - how are they shaping user behaviour? ๏ Question everything around you. Why are things the way they are? ๏ Is there a formal project brief? If so, ask for a copy in advance. Print it off. Scribble questions on it.
  8. 23.

    I keep six honest serving-men (They taught me all I

    knew); Their names are What and Why and When And How and Where and Who. - Rudyard Kipling in his "Just So Stories" (1902)
  9. 24.

    ๏ Why are we doing this? (Business needs) ๏ What

    do the users need? (User needs) ๏ Where do they want it? (Environment/Device) ๏ Who is doing it? (Team) ๏ When do we have to get it done by? (Time available) ๏ How will we measure success?
  10. 25.

    MORE QUESTIONS ๏ What do they expect? ๏ What’s in

    it for them? ๏ What challenges do they face? ๏ How will they know the project has been successful? ๏ Who else should you meet?
  11. 29.

    MEET TEAM MEMBERS ๏ What’s their history? ๏ How do

    they work? ๏ What has been useful in the past? ๏ What has annoyed them? ๏ What are their expectations? ๏ How do they like to communicate?
  12. 30.

    PRODUCT MANAGERS ๏ Some are ux-focused, others are business or

    technical ๏ None of them will be short of an opinion ๏ Support your work with evidence where you can ๏ Share it often
  13. 31.

    PROJECT MANAGERS ๏ Treat as you would a project sponsor

    ๏ Be honest about timings and try to stick with them ๏ Keep them informed ๏ Ask them to coordinate feedback
  14. 32.

    DEVELOPERS AND DESIGNERS ๏ Involve them early on ๏ Share

    your work or collaborate often ๏ Understand their constraints
  15. 33.

    NO.

  16. 34.
  17. 37.

    DRIVER (FAST, INTENSE, FORMAL, RISK-TAKER, LIKES TO BE IN CHARGE)

    ๏ Focus on the present ๏ Get to the bottom line ๏ Speak in terms of short-term concrete results ๏ Give them options ๏ Don’t get too personal ๏ Don’t get into a control contest ๏ However, don’t back down if you believe you are right http://www.softed.com/resources/Docs/SSW0.4.pdf
  18. 38.

    EXPRESSIVE (ANIMATED, IMPATIENT, CREATIVE, FOCUS OF ATTENTION, FUNNY, BACK-SLAPPER) ๏

    Focus on the future and the big picture ๏ Illustrate concepts with stories ๏ Seek their ideas, input ๏ Show personal interest and involvement ๏ Stimulate their creative impulse ๏ Compliment them ๏ Don’t dwell on details ๏ Don’t be too serious ๏ Don’t talk down to them http://www.softed.com/resources/Docs/SSW0.4.pdf
  19. 39.

    AMIABLE (SLOW, EASY-GOING, QUIET, FRIENDLY AND INVITING, FORGIVING) ๏ Be

    flexible ๏ Be easy and informal ๏ Be personal and personable ๏ Emphasize a team approach ๏ Don’t push for too much detail ๏ Don’t hurry them ๏ Don’t confront them ๏ Don’t attack ๏ Don’t be dictatorial or autocratic http://www.softed.com/resources/Docs/SSW0.4.pdf
  20. 40.

    ANALYTICAL (SLOW, QUIET THOUGHTFUL, PREFERS TO BE ON THEIR OWN)

    ๏ Focus on past, present and future ๏ Talk facts ๏ Focus on detail and accuracy ๏ Be logical, well- organized, and serious ๏ Tell them exactly what you will do and when ๏ Don’t rush things ๏ Don’t be too personal ๏ Don’t be overly casual http://www.softed.com/resources/Docs/SSW0.4.pdf
  21. 42.
  22. 43.
  23. 44.

    PRAISE ๏ Praise others freely, frequently, and at any time,

    regardless of accuracy. ๏ Emphasize effort over innate abilities. The Man Who Lies to His Laptop (Clifford Nass with Corina Yen)
  24. 45.

    CRITICISM ๏ Criticise others with caution, keeping it brief and

    specific, and always with clear follow-up actions ๏ Present ways to improve and resolve the criticism, and emphasize the importance of effort for success. ๏ Afterward, give people time to respond when they are ready. The Man Who Lies to His Laptop (Clifford Nass with Corina Yen)
  25. 46.

    MIXING PRAISE WITH CRITICISM ๏ Broad praise ๏ Brief criticism

    focused on specific steps toward improvement - go deep, not broad ๏ Lengthy and detailed positive remarks The Man Who Lies to His Laptop (Clifford Nass with Corina Yen)
  26. 47.

    PERSUASION ๏ Your persuasiveness comes down to whether people perceive

    you as an expert and trustworthy ๏ Being labeled an ‘expert’ or a ‘specialist’ grant you all the persuasive power that actual experts have. ๏ Trustworthiness is generally more persuasive that expertise. ๏ Inconsistency makes you less persuasive. The Man Who Lies to His Laptop (Clifford Nass with Corina Yen)
  27. 49.
  28. 50.
  29. 51.

    MICRO MESSAGING ๏ Actively solicit opinions ๏ Connect on a

    personal level ๏ Constantly ask questions ๏ Attribute/credit ideas ๏ Monitor your facial expressions
  30. 52.

    MICRO MESSAGING ๏ Actively listen to all ๏ Draw in

    participation ๏ Monitor personal greetings ๏ Respond constructively to disagreements ๏ Limit interruptions Micro Messaging (Stephen Young)
  31. 53.

    USEFUL PHRASES ๏ ...... (Silence: Beg for forgiveness, not for

    permission.) ๏ “Do you mind me asking - are you looking for solutions or do you just want to get things off your chest?” ๏ “Which of the solutions you mentioned would you choose?” ๏ “If we were going to meet the delivery date, how could we make that happen?” ๏ “How could we find out...”
  32. 54.

    EVEN MORE USEFUL PHRASES ๏ “What we might do is...”

    ๏ “We could do...” ๏ “Would you...” ๏ “I appreciate it when you...” ๏ “I agree with some of what you’re saying, but here’s what I would like to see changed...”
  33. 61.

    CULTURAL ISSUES: UK ๏ Beware the USA sitcom stereotype ๏

    Humor is regarded as one of the most effective weapons in a British citizen’s arsenal ๏ Brits will agree where possible, but qualify their agreement ๏ When you wish to criticize, disagree or even praise, do it obliquely (using understatement or coded speech) When Cultures Collide: Leading across cultures (Richard D. Lewis)
  34. 62.

    CULTURAL ISSUES: USA ๏ Americans are blunt, forthright and direct

    ๏ They’ll have difficulty if you don’t ‘put your cards on the table’ ๏ Negotiating is considered to be give and take ๏ They feel they’re the best - so their norms are assumed to be the only correct ones When Cultures Collide: Leading across cultures (Richard D. Lewis)
  35. 63.

    CULTURAL ISSUES: FRANCE ๏ Logic will dominate their arguments and

    lead to an extensive analysis of all matters ๏ Opinionated, they nonetheless play their cards close to their chest and build up to them ๏ They can be suspicious of early friendliness ๏ They may defer decisions away from a meeting When Cultures Collide: Leading across cultures (Richard D. Lewis)
  36. 64.

    CULTURAL ISSUES: JAPAN ๏ Face must not be lost and

    politeness must be maintained at all times ๏ Their reluctance to say no is well-known ๏ Decisions will eventually be made by consensus ๏ They are cautious, skilled in stalling tactics and won’t be rushed When Cultures Collide: Leading across cultures (Richard D. Lewis)
  37. 65.

    CULTURAL ISSUES: CHINA ๏ Politeness is observed at all times.

    Confrontation and loss of face (for both parties) must be avoided ๏ Meetings are principally for information gathering - the real decisions will be made elsewhere ๏ A collective spirit prevails - nobody says ‘I’, only ‘We’. ๏ They will work step by step in an unhurried manner When Cultures Collide: Leading across cultures (Richard D. Lewis)
  38. 66.

    CULTURAL ISSUES: INDIA ๏ Indians emanate and expect warmth and

    respect ๏ Do not risk joking with them ๏ Be flexible ๏ Accept chaos and ambiguity When Cultures Collide: Leading across cultures (Richard D. Lewis)
  39. 67.

    SHOW YOUR HRT (HEART) ๏ Humility - you are not

    center of the universe ๏ Respect - you genuinely care about others you work with ๏ Trust - you believe others are competent and will do the right thing Team Geek (Brian W. Fitzpatrick, Ben Collins-Sussman) http://shop.oreilly.com/product/0636920018025.do
  40. 68.

    Staying sane ๏ What am I feeling now? ๏ What

    am I thinking now? ๏ What am I doing at this moment? ๏ How am I breathing?
  41. 69.

    First Rule of Consulting:  No matter how much you

    try, you can’t stop people from sticking beans up their nose. Jared Spool - http://www.uie.com/brainsparks/
  42. 70.

    http://sarahmillican.blogspot.com/2012/08/the-11-o-clock-rule.html Millican’s Law “This is Millican's Law. If you have

    a hard gig, quiet, a death, a struggle, whatever, you can only be mad and frustrated and gutted until 11am the next day. Then you must draw a line under it and forget about it. As going into the next gig thinking you are shit will mean you will die.” “Equally, if you nail it, slam it, destroy it, whatever, you can only be smug about it until 11am the next day (in the past, I have set an alarm so I could get up and gloat for an extra half hour) as if you go into the next gig thinking you are God's gift to comedy, you will die. That is Millican's Law and it totally works. It means you move on quickly.”
  43. 74.

    A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 1. Please write down A or

    B, then C or D. a. More likely to lean back when stating opinions b. More likely to be erect or lean forward when stating opinions c. Less use of hands when talking d. More use of hands when talking Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  44. 75.

    A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 2. Please write down A or

    B, then C or D. a. Demonstrates less energy b. Demonstrates more energy c. More controlled body movement d. More flowing body movement Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  45. 76.

    A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 3. Please write down A or

    B, then C or D. a. Less forceful gestures b. More forceful gestures c. Less facial expressiveness d. More facial expressiveness Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  46. 77.

    A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 4. Please write down A or

    B, then C or D. a. Softer voice b. Louder voice c. Appears more serious d. Appears more fun-loving Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  47. 78.

    A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 5. Please write down A or

    B, then C or D. a. More likely to ask questions b. More likely to make statements c. Less inflection in voice d. More inflection in voice Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  48. 79.

    A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 6. Please write down A or

    B, then C or D. a. Less apt to exert pressure for action b. More apt to exert pressure for action c. Less apt to show feelings d. More apt to show feelings Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  49. 80.

    A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 7. Please write down A or

    B, then C or D. a. More tentative when expressing opinions b. Less tentative when expressing opinions c. More task-orientated conversations d. More people-orientated conversations Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  50. 81.

    A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 8. Please write down A or

    B, then C or D. a. Slower to resolve problem situations b. Quicker to resolve problem situations c. More orientated toward fact and logic d. More orientated toward feelings and opinions Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  51. 82.

    A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT - 9. Please write down A or

    B, then C or D. a. Slower-paced b. Faster-paced c. Less likely to use small talk or tell anecdotes d. More likely to use small talk or tell anecdotes Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  52. 83.

    A PERSONAL ASSESSMENT Please individually total the number of A’s

    you wrote down, the number of B’s, the number of C’s... well, you get the idea... Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  53. 84.

    AH, THE ASSESSMENT Which out of A or B has

    the higher count? a: less assertive b: more assertive Which out of C or D has the higher count? c: less responsive d: more responsive Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM)
  54. 85.

    AH, THE QUESTIONNAIRE HOW DO YOU THINK OTHERS PERCEIVE YOU?

    Source: People styles at work and beyond, Robert Bolton & Dorothy Grover Bolton (AMACOM) ๏ less assertive (a) and less responsive (c): analytical ๏ more assertive (b) and less responsive (c): driver ๏ less assertive (a) and more responsive (d): amiable ๏ more assertive (b) and more responsive (d): expressive