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Thinking differently: trying to reduce topdressing & core aerification by careful adjustment of the growth rate & organic matter

C62291821dac0dd5b7ef3b72a30cd137?s=47 Micah Woods
November 28, 2018

Thinking differently: trying to reduce topdressing & core aerification by careful adjustment of the growth rate & organic matter

My presentation on breaking all the rules about managing organic matter, delivered as part of the 40th Congress of the Spanish Greenkeepers Association in Sevilla.

C62291821dac0dd5b7ef3b72a30cd137?s=128

Micah Woods

November 28, 2018
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Transcript

  1. Thinking Differently Thinking Differently Trying to reduce topdressing & core

    Trying to reduce topdressing & core aerification by careful adjustment aerification by careful adjustment of the growth rate & organic matter of the growth rate & organic matter Micah Woods Micah Woods Chief Scientist | Asian Turfgrass Center Chief Scientist | Asian Turfgrass Center www.asianturfgrass.com www.asianturfgrass.com November 28, 2018 November 28, 2018
  2. 4 stories 1. Surprised at PGA Catalunya 2. The textbook

    way 3. I started noticing 4. Six surprising years --- My recommendations now
  3. 1. Surprised at PGA Catalunya 1. Surprised at PGA Catalunya

  4. Talking about nutrient requirements, November 2012

  5. After Madrid, I went to meet David Bataller in Girona.

  6. PGA Catalunya, December

  7. PGA Catalunya, May

  8. PGA Catalunya, May

  9. PGA Catalunya, May

  10. PGA Catalunya, January

  11. 2. The textbook way 2. The textbook way

  12. Moeller & Lowe Green Section Record Vol. 54 (21) November

    4, 2016
  13. “the underlying problem is often excessive organic matter just beneath

    the putting surface. Core aeration, verticutting, and topdressing are the primary agronomic practices used to manage organic matter, but they are disliked by most golfers.” Moeller & Lowe, 2016
  14. “There are many agronomic programs that influence the playability and

    health of putting greens, but organic matter management is arguably the most important.” Moeller & Lowe, 2016
  15. “In general, organic matter accumulates when programs that dilute organic

    matter are not keeping pace with organic matter production.” Moeller & Lowe, 2016
  16. “0.5-1.5 cubic feet per 1,000 square feet every 7-14 days

    effectively dilutes organic matter throughout the growing season” Moeller & Lowe, 2016 That is 0.15 to 0.45 mm (150 to 450 mL/m2) every 7 to 14 days
  17. Hartwiger & O’Brien, Green Section Record, July/August 2001

  18. O’Brien & Hartwiger, Green Section Record, March/April 2003

  19. “To keep organic matter content below 3-4 percent in the

    upper rootzone, these articles recommend core aeration treatments that impact 15-20 percent of the putting surface each year and topdressing programs that incorporate at least 40-50 cubic feet of sand per 1,000 square feet annually.” Moeller & Lowe, 2016 That is 12 to 15 mm per year (12 to 15 L/m2)
  20. “Increasing sand topdressing frequency to every 7 to 14 days

    and applying at least 20.3 ft3 /1000 ft2 topdressing sand annually, combined with routine soil cultivation to ensure sand incorporation, are practices that can be utilized to manage SOM.” Schmid C.J., Gaussoin R.E., and S.A. Gaussoin. 2014. Organic matter concentration of creeping bentgrass putting greens in the continental U.S. and resident management impact. Applied Turfgrass Science. That’s a recommendation of at least 6 mm per year (6 L/m2). Another recommendation
  21. 3. I started noticing

  22. Creeping bentgrass green in Kumamoto, Japan. No coring for multiple

    years.
  23. Creeping bentgrass in Kyushu in late summer. No coring in

    13 years.
  24. None
  25. Zoysia japonica in England, July

  26. Turf varieties at ATC research facility in Thailand, 2008

  27. Penncross and L-93 bentgrass grown from seed in Thailand

  28. Penncross bentgrass in Thailand

  29. Creeping bentgrass green in Kanagawa, March

  30. Articles and books transitioned from explaining the textbook ways at

    the start, to describing how one can make site-specific adjustments that break a lot of the “rules.”
  31. None
  32. Spreadsheet from PACE Turf with estimated sand requirement based on

    temperature (growth potential).
  33. 4. Six surprising years

  34. Moss on a korai green at Keya GC in Fukuoka,

    May 2012
  35. Korai green after 12 mm hollow tine and 2 mm

    topdress Keya GC, May 2013
  36. Keya GC, June 2013

  37. Keya GC, August 2013

  38. Keya GC, August 2014

  39. Keya GC, March 2015

  40. Keya GC, August 2017

  41. None
  42. None
  43. None
  44. None
  45. Keya GC, August 2018

  46. None
  47. None
  48. Keya GC, August 2018

  49. My recommendations now

  50. Measuring clipping volume from putting greens

  51. None
  52. None
  53. None
  54. Sample for organic matter by depth Keya GC, May 2017

  55. None
  56. Collecting sample by depth in Bangkok Seashore paspalum green, November

    2018
  57. Korai green soil profile in Bangkok November 2018

  58. Korai green soil profile in Bangkok November 2018

  59. Zoysia matrella 0 to 2 cm depth prior to furnace

  60. Zoysia matrella after burn at 360 °C

  61. Zoysia matrella after burn at 360 °C and then stirred

  62. Zoysia matrella after burn at 440 °C

  63. Zoysia matrella after burn at 440 °C and then stirred

  64. None
  65. None
  66. None
  67. None
  68. What I recommend now: • Be aware of the textbook

    recommendations • Measure the growth rate • Measure surface firmness • Measure soil water content • Measure the surface layer organic matter • Adjust to get desired results
  69. More information at www.asianturfgrass.com