Remote Teaching - 3 Myths

Remote Teaching - 3 Myths

In this talk we present three pairs of extreme opinions about remote teaching: "pedagogy should drive technology" vs. "technology should drive pedagogy", "you can't build a community without everyone in the same place" vs. "you can't have synchronicity while being fair and equitable", and "asynchronous teaching means making lots of videos" vs. "there is already a video on every concept I might want to teach". For each of these pairs of statements, we will provide practical suggestions for pedagogical approaches, resources, tools, and course components for striking the balance in between. We will also provide a list of resources for teaching technical material, specifically statistics and data science, but applicable to most mathematical sciences.

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Mine Cetinkaya-Rundel

June 02, 2020
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  1. TALMO June 2020 REMOTE TEACHING: 3 MYTHS MINE ÇETINKAYA-RUNDEL Photo

    by Victoria Heath on Unsplash bit.ly/remote-teach-3-myths minebocek mine-cetinkaya-rundel cetinkaya.mine@gmail.com
  2. TECHNOLOGY SHOULD DRIVE PEDAGOGY PEDAGOGY SHOULD DRIVE TECHNOLOGY

  3. - Consistency within a course is crucial - Stick vs.

    pivot - Get early feedback! - Consistency across courses is important - You have access vs. students have access - Advocate for your choices but don’t make them your students’ problem - Make required software a breeze to get started with - Computing environment, e.g. [RStudio Cloud] - Less is more - Be judicious with the number of tools - You love and use regularly ≠ best choice for course - Free to use ≠ free to learn TECHNOLOGY / PEDAGOGY
  4. CAN’T HAVE SYNCHRONICITY WHILE BEING FAIR AND EQUITABLE CAN’T BUILD

    COMMUNITY WITHOUT EVERYONE IN THE SAME PLACE AT THE SAME TIME
  5. - Consider the added value of being synchronous - Attending

    a synchronous lecture: Seeing others’ faces + hearing others’ questions + ? - Working on a problem as a small group: Seeing others’ faces + hearing others’ questions + thinking together + learning from each other + ? - Weigh the added value against the challenges of synchronous engagement - Geography - Internet access - Computer setup - Living circumstances - Missing one of the most rewarding aspects of being faculty: personal interactions with students - Make yourself available, e.g. daily brief office hours? virtual coffee? - And remember, this won’t be forever! (I hope!) COMMUNITY / SYNCHRONICITY
  6. THERE IS ALREADY A VIDEO ON EVERY CONCEPT I MIGHT

    WANT TO TEACH ASYNCHRONOUS TEACHING MEANS MAKING LOTS OF VIDEOS
  7. - It’s ok to not be an expert video maker

    - Build on what you know (animated graphics in R / animations in Keynote, PowerPoint, etc.) - Supplement existing videos, instead of recreating them - Make a plan and learn from others - Think beyond the camera in your laptop [video] ASYNCHRONY / MATERIALS
  8. None
  9. - It’s ok to not be an expert video maker

    - Build on what you know (animated graphics in R / animations in Keynote, PowerPoint, etc.) - Supplement existing videos, instead of recreating them - Make a plan and learn from others - Think beyond the camera in your laptop - Video is only one of the many options for asynchronous engagement - Interactive applets, e.g. [Rossman/Chance Applet Collection], [ShinyEd] - Interactive tutorials, e.g. [Primers built with learnr] - You can build an asynchronous community - Peer review, e.g. [on GitHub] - Reading with collaborative note taking, e.g. Google Docs, [Hypothesis], [Perusall] - Opt-in virtual communication, e.g. [virtual donut] ASYNCHRONY / MATERIALS
  10. AN INCOMPLETE LIST OF RESOURCES - General: - Teaching online

    on short notice (Greg Wilson) [Webinar] [Blog post] - A pattern language for screencasting (Chen and Rabb, 2009) [DOI] - Statistics / data science / computing: - Tips for teaching tech online, deeply informed by the Carpentries (Elizabeth Wickes) [Blog post] - Teaching R online with RStudio Cloud (Mine Çetinkaya- Rundel) [Webinar] [Blog post] - Mapping and planning a live coding workshop (The Carpentries) [Blog post] - Jumping into digital: Lessons learned while moving live- coding workshops online [Webinar] - Sharing on Short Notice: How to Get Your Materials Online With R Markdown (Alison Hill and Desiree De Lyon) [Webinar] [Blog post] - Automated feedback in R and Python (Mine Çetinkaya Rundel and Tiffany Timbers) [Slides + Demo materials]
  11. OPPORTUNITIES FOR LEARNING TOGETHER - Teaching R online with RStudio

    Cloud - Building interactive tutorials in R - Teaching computing with Git and GitHub - Leveraging GitHub for collaboration and automation in computing courses - Other: ___ ➡ Express your interest at bit.ly/wrkshp-interest bit.ly/remote-teach-3-myths minebocek mine-cetinkaya-rundel cetinkaya.mine@gmail.com