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Greek Art

3700411ae81a5ba151f9946dcb59c386?s=47 nichsara
October 04, 2013

Greek Art

3700411ae81a5ba151f9946dcb59c386?s=128

nichsara

October 04, 2013
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  1. Greek  Art   Reading:   Gardner’s,  pp.  104-­‐163.    

    Range:   c.  600-­‐300  BCE   Archaic,  Classical,  Late  Classical       Terms/Concepts:   Polis  (Poleis),  doric,  ionic,  triglyph,   metope,  capital,  volute,  conEnuous   frieze,  naos,  peristyle,  opisthodomos,   acropolis,  metope,  triglyph,  canon  of   proporEons,  barbarian,  Kouros,  Kore,     Pythagorean,  golden  raEo.   Monument  List:     Kouros  (Metropolitan  Kouros),  Archaic   Greek,  ca.  600  BCE.     Kroisos  (Anavysos  Kouros),  from   Anavysos,  Greece,  Archaic  Greek,  c.  530   BCE.     KriEos  Boy,  Early  Classical  Greek,  ca.  480   BCE     Myron,  Diskobolos  (Discus  Thrower),   Roman  copy  of  an  Early  Classical,  470-­‐440   BCE     Polykleitos,  Doryphoros  (Spear  Bearer),   High  Classical  Greek,  450-­‐440  BCE     Kallikrates  and  IkEnos,  Parthenon,  High   Classical  Greek,  447-­‐438  BCE.     Lysippos,  Apoxyomenos  (Scraper),  Late   Classical  Greek,  ca.  330  BCE.  
  2. Map   Archaic:  c.  600-­‐480  BCE  

  3. Greek  Coloniza?on  c.  700-­‐500  BCE   34 orientalizing styles to

    neighbouring peoples. The Greeks colonized the long-familiar shores that were nearest to them. At the same time, Phoenicians also moved west, through Greek waters and now no longer in competition with Greeks. They moved to shores beyond the main Greek colonizing area – to Sardinia, Spain and North Africa (Carthage). In Spain they stimulated local west, often along shared routes, but the two cultures create definable spheres of influence. A second phase of consolidation north and south follows in the sixth century – mainly by Greeks – in the Black Sea, France and Libya. Winds and currents promote circulation, allowing different routes to be used on outward and return voyages, ensuring varied contacts and facilitating strong links with the homelands. Northerlies take Greeks traders directly to Egypt. They return by the Levant, making these areas a main influence on the arts. 0˚ 10˚ 10˚ 20˚ 30˚ 40˚ 40˚ 30˚ Rhône Ebro Tagus Nile Danube Tigris Po Tiber A T L A N T I C O C E A N M E D I T E R R A N E A N S E A A D RIATIC SEA B L A C K S E A RED SEA AEGEAN SE A P Y R E N E E S A L P S A T L A S M T S TAURUS M TS SIERRA NEVADA S C Y T H I A N S I B E R I A N S PHRYGIANS & LYDIANS BALEARIC IS SARDINIA Nuraghic art CORSICA SICILY MALTA CRETE RHODES CYPRUS EUBOEA IONIA PHOENICIA ETRURIA A F R I C A ITA LY GREECE A N A T O L I A S Y R I A E G Y P T Iberian art Villanovan / Etruscan ar t Massalia Cumae Pithecusae Poseidonia Syracuse Cyrene Naucratis Al Mina Taras Thasos Sinope Olbia Phasis Istrus Sybaris Emporion Sidon Tyre Carthage Lixus Ibiza Toscanos Motya Tharros N 0 0 500 miles 750 kms 1 The Colonizing of the Mediterranean from the East flow of Syrian goods and Greek orientalizing styles flow of settlement 8th/7th centuries BC flow of settlement c. post 625 BC flow of Phoenician goods prevailing currents/winds Phoenician colonies and trading posts Greek colonies
  4. Metropolitan  Kouros,  AVca,  Archaic,  c.   600  BCE  

  5. Metropolitan Kouros. From Attica. c.600 BCE. Menkaure and a Queen,

    perhaps Khamerernebty II (from Giza). c.2490- 2472 BCE. Egyptian pharaoh (king) Psammetichos I (r.664-610) invited Greek mercenaries and merchants to Egypt
  6. None
  7. Metropolitan   Kouros,  AVca,   Archaic,  c.  600  BCE  

    Portrait  Statue  of   Mentuemet,  Late   Period  Egypt,   660-­‐650  BCE  
  8. Metropolitan  Kouros,  AVca,  Archaic,  c.  600  BCE  

  9. The  Berlin  Kore,  Cemetery  at  Keratea,   near  Athens,  Archaic,

     570-­‐560  BCE  
  10. The  Berlin  Kore,   Archaic,  570-­‐560   BCE   Metropolitan

      Kouros,  AVca,   Archaic,  c.  600  BCE  
  11. Kroisos,  (Anavysos  Kouros),  Cemetery  at  Anavysos,  near   Athens,  c.

     530  BCE    “Stay  and  mourn  at  the  monument  for   dead  Kroisos  whom  violent  Ares   destroyed,  fighEng  in  the  front  rank.”    
  12. Kroisos,  (Anavysos   Kouros),  Cemetery  at   Anavysos,  near  

    Athens,  c.  530  BCE   Metropolitan Kouros. From Attica. c.600 BCE.
  13. Peplos  Kore,   Acropolis,  Athens,   Archaic,  c.  530  BCE

      Kroisos,  (Anavysos   Kouros),  Cemetery  at   Anavysos,  near   Athens,  c.  530  BCE  
  14. None
  15. A  Turning  Point   KriEos  Boy,  Athenian  Acropolis,  Early  

    Classical,  c.  480  BCE.  
  16. Myron,  Diskobolos  (Discus  Thrower),   Roman  copy  of  an  Early

     Classical,  470-­‐440   BCE  
  17. Eadweard  Muybridge,  Man  Throwing  Discus,  Collotype  from  glass   negaEve,

     1883-­‐1886  
  18. None
  19. Different  Roman  copies  (1st-­‐2nd  centuries  CE)  of  Myron’s  5th-­‐century  CE

     bronze  original.  
  20. Warrior,  Found  in  the  sea  off  Riace,  Italy,  Early  Classical,

     460-­‐450  BCE  
  21. Warrior  (Detail),  Found  in  the   sea  off  Riace,  Italy,

     Early   Classical,  460-­‐450  BCE  
  22. Warrior  (Detail),  Found  in  the   sea  off  Riace,  Italy,

     Early   Classical,  460-­‐450  BCE  
  23. The  Canon  of  Polykleitos   Polykleitos,  Doryphoros  (Spear  Bearer),  Roman

     Copy  from   Greek  Original,  High  Classical  c.  5th  Century  CE  
  24. “but  beauty,  he  thinks,  does  not  reside  in  the  proper

      proporEon  of  the  elements  but  in  the  proper  proporEon   of  the  parts,  such  as  for  example  that  of  finger  to  finger   and  all  these  to  the  palm  and  base  of  hand,  of  those  to   the  forearm,  of  the  forearm  to  the  upper  arm  and  of   everything  to  everything  else,  just  as  described  in  the   Canon  of  Polykleitos.  For  having  taught  us  in  that  work   all  the  proporEons  of  the  body,  Polykleitos  supported   his  treaEse  with  a  work  of  art,  making  a  statue   according  to  the  tenets  of  the  treaEse  and  calling  it,  like   the  treaEse  itself,  the  Canon.  So  then,  all  philosophers   and  doctors  accept  that  beauty  resides  in  the  due   proporEon  of  the  parts  of  the  body.”  
  25. None
  26. None
  27. None
  28. Contrapposto   Pythagorean  Table  of  Opposites      Finite  

         Infinite    Odd        Even    One      Many    Right        Leb    Rest      MoEon    Straight    Crooked    Light      Darkness    Good      Evil    Square      Oblong  
  29. None
  30. Aerial  View  of  Athens  with  the  Acropolis   High  (Acro)

     +  City  (Polis)  =  High  City   The  Athenian  Acropolis  
  31. The  Archaic  Athenian  Acropolis   Dimitri  Tsalikanis,  Reconstruc?on  of  the

     Archaic  Acropolis,  c.  600-­‐500   BCE  
  32. None
  33. Darius  and  Xerxes  Receiving  Tribute,  Apandana  (Audience  Hall),  Persepolis,  c.

     500  BCE   Xerxes   Darius   Remember  the  Persians?  
  34. The  Achaemenid  Empire  

  35. First  Persian  War  

  36. Destroyed  Pediment  from  the  Old  Temple  of  Athena,  Acropolis,  Athens,

      Archaic,  600-­‐550  BCE  
  37. Athena  from  the  pediment  of  the  Old   Temple  to

     Athena,  Archaic,  c.  600-­‐550   BCE  
  38. Pediment  Sculpture  from  an  unknown  Athenian  temple,  found  buried  

    on  the  acropolis,  Archaic,  c.  600  BCE   Oath  of  Plataia:  "of  all  the  temples  burned   and  thrown  down  by  the  barbarians  I  will   rebuild  none,  but  I  will  leave  them  as  a   memorial  for  future  generaEons  of  the   impiety  of  the  barbarians"  
  39. The image cannot be displayed. Your computer may not have

    enough memory to open the image, or the image may have been corrupted. Restart your computer, and then open the file again. If the red x still appears, you may have to delete the image and then insert it again. The image cannot be displayed. Your computer may not have enough memory to open the image, or the image may have been corrupted. Restart your computer, and then open the file again. If the red x still appears, you may have to delete the image and then insert it again. Ground  Zero  weeks  aber  September  2011.  
  40. Kresilas. Pericles. Roman copy after bronze original of c.429 BCE.

    Pericles  and  the  Rebuilding  of  the  Acropolis  
  41. Panathenaic  Procession  

  42. The  Classical  Acropolis   Parthenon   Picture  Gallery   Propylaia

      Statue  of  Athena   Promachos   Erechtheion   Temple  of   Athena   Nike   Panathenaic   Procession  
  43. The  Classical  Acropolis   Parthenon   Picture  Gallery   Propylaia

      Statue  of  Athena   Promachos   Erechtheion   Temple  of   Athena   Nike   Panathenaic   Procession  
  44. Leo von Klenze. Ideal View of Athens. 1846. Neue Pinakothek,

    Munich. Propylaia Entrance, or Propylaia, of the Acropolis, Athens, c. 347-432. Propylaion: Monumental entrance to a sacred space or citadel
  45. *Propylaion: Monumental entrance to a sacred space or citadel Mnesikles.

    Propylaia (view from the east and northeast). Acropolis, Athens. 437-432 BCE.
  46. Mnesikles. Propylaia (view from the east and northeast). Acropolis, Athens.

    437-432 BCE.
  47. The  Classical  Acropolis   Parthenon   Picture  Gallery   Propylaia

      Statue  of  Athena   Promachos   Erechtheion   Temple  of   Athena   Nike   Panathenaic   Procession  
  48. Aerial view of the Acropolis, Athens. Plan  of  the  Erechtheion,

      Acropolis,  Athens,  Greece,  ca.   421-­‐405  BCE.  
  49. Erechtheion (view from the southeast), Acropolis, Athens. 421-405 BCE. Carya?d

      “Porch  of  the  Maidens”  
  50. Caryatid from the south porch of the Erechtheion. High Classical,

    421-406 BCE. lPeploszKore, from the Acropolis, Athens. Archaic c.530 BCE.
  51. Iktinos and Kallikrates. The Parthenon (seen from northwest). Acropolis, Athens,

    447-438 BCE.
  52. Doric   Ionic   Cross-­‐SecEon  of  the  Parthenon  

  53. Plan  of  the  Parthenon  and  its  sculptural   program.  

  54. Diagram of the Doric Order. Metope Parthenon

  55. Lapith  and  Centaur  Metope,  Parthenon,  Acropolis,  Athens,  High   Classical,

     450-­‐430  BCE.   Aeschylus:  "For  coming  to  the  land  of  Hellas   [the  Persians]  were  not  restrained  by  religious   awe  from  looEng  the  statues  of  the  gods  nor   from  burning  temples.  But  altars  were   destroyed,  the  statues  of  the  gods  over-­‐   turned  from  their  bases  in  umer  confusion"  
  56. Lapith  and  Centaur  Metope,  Parthenon,  Acropolis,  Athens,  High   Classical,

     450-­‐430  BCE   Themistokles:  Xerxes  as  "one  who  acts  in  the   same  way  toward  temples  and  private   property,  burning  and  throwing  down  the   statues  of  the  gods,  who  even  scourged  the   sea  and  sank  shackles  in  it."  
  57. “Old  Men”  Frieze,  Parthenon,  Acropolis,  Athens,  High  Classical,  450-­‐430  

    BCE   Riders  Frieze,  Parthenon,  Acropolis,  Athens,  High  Classical,  450-­‐430  BCE  
  58. Birth  of  Athena,  East  Pediment,  Parthenon,  Acropolis,  Athens,  High  

    Classical,  450-­‐430  BCE   Contest  between  Athena  and  Poseidon,  West  Pediment,  Parthenon,   Acropolis,  Athens,  High  Classical,  450-­‐430  BCE  
  59. The  ProporEons  of  Phidias  

  60. =    (phi)  =  1  =  .6180  

  61. 5-­‐44,  Kallikrates,  and   IkEnos,  Frontal  View  of   the

     Parthenon,  The   Golden  Rectangle,   Acropolis  Athens,   447-­‐432  BCE    
  62. 5-­‐44,  Kallikrates,  and  IkEnos,  Frontal  View  of  the  Parthenon,  Acropolis

      Athens,  447-­‐432  BCE    
  63. 5-­‐44,  Kallikrates,  and  IkEnos,  Frontal  View  of  the  Parthenon,  Acropolis

      Athens,  447-­‐432  BCE    
  64. 1   .618   Floor  Plan  of  Parthenon,  Interior  of

     the  Parthenon  is  a  Golden   Rectangle.  
  65. Diagram  of  Parthenon  with  exaggerated  curves  

  66. Phidian  ProporEons  and  the  Human  Form  

  67. Athena,  Amributed  to  Phidias,  High  Classical,  c.   5th  century

     CE  
  68. Athena,  Amributed  to  Phidias,   High  Classical,  c.  5th  century

      CE  
  69. Athena  Parthenos,  (ReconstrucEon),   Parthenon,  Acropolis,  Athens,  c.  440  

    BCE  
  70. a   b   Athena  Parthenos,  (ReconstrucEon),   Parthenon,  Acropolis,

     Athens,  c.  440  BCE   Statueme  of  the  Athena  Nikophoros,  possible  Roman   copy  of  the  Parthenon  cult  statue,  1st  century  CE.  
  71. The  Canon  of  Lysippos   Lysippos,  Apoxyomenos  (The  Scraper),  Roman

     Copy  of  a  Greek  Original,   Late  Classical,  4th  century  CE  
  72. Polykleitos,  Doryphoros,  5th  c.   Lysippos,  Apoxyomenos,  4th  c.  

  73. Polykleitos,  Doryphoros,  5th  c.   Lysippos,  Apoxyomenos,  4th  c.  

  74. Tholos  at  Epidauros,  360  BCE  

  75. Tholos  at  Epidauros,  360  BCE  

  76. None