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April Wensel: Developers, meet your users: Best practices for including developers in user tests

1fa9cb8c7997c8c4d3d251fb5e41f749?s=47 Realm
March 01, 2017

April Wensel: Developers, meet your users: Best practices for including developers in user tests

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vcUbDJ4q7dw

Speaker: April Wensel is an international speaker and the founder of Compassionate Coding, a social enterprise focused on helping companies cultivate sustainable, human-­centered agile development practices and grow the emotional intelligence of their teams. She has spent the past decade in software engineering and technical leadership roles at various startups and research institutions. She also mentors with programs like Black Girls Code and Hackbright Academy in order to support diversity in the software industry. When not coding, she enjoys writing, running marathons, and cooking vegan food.

Abstract: Most UX designers recognize the importance of user testing to uncover user needs and build empathy for the user's experience with the product. However, in many companies, developers are completely left out of the user testing equation, or perhaps only included in second-hand accounts.
What a tragedy! Nothing beats seeing your users interacting with your product first-hand. If you're leaving the developers out of your user tests, you're missing out on a huge opportunity. By bringing their unique perspective to the user tests, developers can glean helpful insights and build empathy, which will have far-reaching effects on the future of your product. Not only that, but when developers participate in user tests, they gain a better understanding of the motivation behind designer requests, which facilitates better collaboration.
In this talk, developers will learn how to get the most out of user tests, and designers and others will learn how to include developers in user tests most effectively and avoid common pitfalls.

Twitter Link: https://twitter.com/aprilwensel

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Realm

March 01, 2017
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Transcript

  1. DEVELOPERS, MEET YOUR USERS April Wensel Founder of Compassionate Coding

    @aprilwensel #MWDCon COMPASSIONATE C O D I N G Growing Compassion Through User Research
  2. @aprilwensel

  3. Cannon & Perry. A vocational interest scale for computer programmers.

    1966. @aprilwensel 1966 - A vocational interest scale for computer programmers
  4. “Programmers are crazy about puzzles, tend to like research applications

    and risk-taking, and don’t like people.” Cannon & Perry. A vocational interest scale for computer programmers. 1966. @aprilwensel
  5. “PROGRAMMERS… DON’T LIKE PEOPLE.” Cannon & Perry. A vocational interest

    scale for computer programmers. 1966. @aprilwensel
  6. CUSTOMERS SUFFER @aprilwensel

  7. @aprilwensel

  8. @aprilwensel

  9. Animation by Steve Cutts - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VASywEuqFd8 @aprilwensel

  10. http://www.newyorker.com/business/currency/ silicon-valley-has-an-empathy-vacuum http://onbeing.org/programs/anil-dash-techs- moral-reckoning/ @aprilwensel

  11. @aprilwensel

  12. CAN WE DO BETTER? @aprilwensel

  13. @aprilwensel

  14. @aprilwensel

  15. @aprilwensel

  16. @aprilwensel

  17. @aprilwensel

  18. COMPASSION @aprilwensel

  19. “You may never have used the word compassion, but when

    you’re identifying somebody’s pain point and you’re trying to create something that alleviates it, that’s actually COMPASSIONATE PRODUCT DESIGN.” –Monica Worline http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/ what_does_compassionate_workplace_look_like @aprilwensel
  20. USER TESTS @aprilwensel

  21. 1.  WHAT are user tests? 2.  WHY should you care?

    3.  HOW can you participate? THE PLAN @aprilwensel
  22. Photo by Jon Rogers @aprilwensel

  23. WHAT @aprilwensel

  24. “HUMAN-CENTERED DESIGN is all about building a deep EMPATHY with

    the PEOPLE you’re designing for…” http://www.designkit.org/human-centered-design @aprilwensel
  25. “This approach enhances effectiveness and efficiency, IMPROVES HUMAN WELL- BEING…and

    counteracts possible adverse effects of use on HUMAN HEALTH…” https://www.iso.org/standard/52075.html @aprilwensel
  26. Study of a USER in a CONTEXT using TOOLS to

    perform TASKS to achieve a GOAL https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_7nqhQpmzg
  27. @aprilwensel

  28. WHY @aprilwensel

  29. 1.  BUILD COMPASSION FOR USERS @aprilwensel Why

  30. @aprilwensel https://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/cast/ jimmy-fallon-14931/character/nick-burns-17301

  31. @aprilwensel

  32. “If we BLAME THE CUSTOMER FOR BEING STUPID, we’re putting

    blame in the wrong place. WE’RE NOT BEING EMPATHETIC at all. We are the problem. We design the product or service!” –Monica Worline http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/ what_does_compassionate_workplace_look_like @aprilwensel
  33. @aprilwensel

  34. “[T]he most valuable contribution of usability testing is made when

    PROGRAMMERS are forced…to VIEW TYPICAL USERS STRUGGLING with their programs. The programmers are SHOCKED and INCREDULOUS…” –Alan Cooper, The Inmates Are Running the Asylum @aprilwensel
  35. “Usability testing is a USEFUL WHACK ON THE SIDE OF

    THE HEAD for recalcitrant software engineers, showing them that THERE IS INDEED A PROBLEM.” –Alan Cooper, The Inmates Are Running the Asylum @aprilwensel
  36. @aprilwensel

  37. “Our highest priority is to SATISFY THE CUSTOMER through early

    and continuous delivery of VALUABLE software.” http://agilemanifesto.org/principles.html @aprilwensel
  38. 1.  BUILD COMPASSION FOR USERS 2.  COMMUNICATE WITH DESIGNERS @aprilwensel

    Why
  39. @aprilwensel

  40. @aprilwensel

  41. @aprilwensel

  42. “By including developers, designers, and product owners in the majority

    of decisions, it makes the entire design process FASTER and EASIER TO CHANGE…” –Laura Klein UX for Lean Startups @aprilwensel
  43. 1.  BUILD COMPASSION FOR USERS 2.  COMMUNICATE WITH DESIGNERS 3. 

    FIND MORE MEANING IN WORK @aprilwensel Why
  44. @aprilwensel

  45. @aprilwensel

  46. "Actively participating in work that links PURPOSE, MEANING, and PASSION

    to advance the greater good is DEEPLY SATISFYING." Shawn Murphy. The Optimistic Workplace @aprilwensel
  47. @aprilwensel 1.  BUILD COMPASSION FOR USERS 2.  COMMUNICATE WITH DESIGNERS

    3.  FIND MORE MEANING IN WORK Why
  48. @aprilwensel

  49. Low Medium High Kimmy @aprilwensel

  50. @aprilwensel

  51. @aprilwensel

  52. @aprilwensel

  53. HOW @aprilwensel

  54. @aprilwensel

  55. @aprilwensel “To be together with all five senses is irreplaceable.”

    –Gloria Steinem
  56. 1.  Ask them easy background questions about themselves to put

    them at ease 2.  Explain that this is not a test of them but rather of the product 3.  Ask them to speak their thoughts out loud as they use the product 4.  Ask them to perform tasks 5.  Watch and record observations, quotes, and interpretations* on sticky notes, one per note 6.  Debrief @aprilwensel
  57. 1.  Ask them easy background questions about themselves to put

    them at ease 2.  Explain that this is not a test of them but rather of the product 3.  Ask them to speak their thoughts out loud as they use the product 4.  Ask them to perform tasks 5.  Watch and record observations, quotes, and interpretations on sticky notes, one per note 6.  Debrief @aprilwensel
  58. @aprilwensel

  59. 1.  Overgeneralizing from one user 2.  Letting user feedback too

    directly dictate designs Pitfalls @aprilwensel YOU  HAVE  5   NEW   NOTIFICATIONS  
  60. 1.  Overgeneralizing from one user 2.  Letting user feedback too

    directly dictate designs 3.  Letting feedback hurt your ego Pitfalls @aprilwensel
  61. “[Interviewing] requires that we interviewers KEEP OUR EGOS IN CHECK.

    It requires that we realize that we are not the center of the world. … At the heart of interviewing research is an INTEREST IN OTHER INDIVIDUALS’ stories because they are of worth.” –Irving Seidman Interviewing as Qualitative Research, 1991 @aprilwensel
  62. 1.  Overgeneralizing from one user 2.  Letting user feedback too

    directly dictate designs 3.  Letting feedback hurt your ego 4.  Asking leading questions Pitfalls @aprilwensel “Wouldn’t it be better if…” “What’s confusing about this page…”
  63. 1.  Overgeneralizing from one user 2.  Letting user feedback too

    directly dictate designs 3.  Letting feedback hurt your ego 4.  Asking leading questions 5.  Spending too much time doing it – maybe become a UX researcher or designer? :D Pitfalls @aprilwensel
  64. 1.  Empathize with users to build more useful products 2. 

    Collaborate more effectively with designers 3.  Find more meaning in your work Benefits of User Testing @aprilwensel
  65. 1.  Watch & Listen 2.  Record 3.  Analyze 4.  Implement

    5.  Repeat! Process @aprilwensel
  66. @aprilwensel

  67. @aprilwensel

  68. “Remaking the tech industry…reforming it around being more ETHICAL and

    HUMANE…this is one of the most important missions around.” –Anil Dash @aprilwensel http://onbeing.org/programs/anil- dash-techs-moral-reckoning/
  69. @aprilwensel https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/ 2016/11/the-binge-breaker/501122/

  70. “If it is not tempered by COMPASSION and EMPATHY, REASON

    can lead men and women into a MORAL VOID.” –Karen Armstrong compassionatecoding.com april@compassionatecoding.com @aprilwensel Twelve Steps to a Compassionate Life