Master Prototype 2

Master Prototype 2

Prototype 2 presentation for my studies as Master of Arts in Design.

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Benjamin Wiederkehr

January 18, 2013
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Transcript

  1. PROTOTYPE II Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 Benjamin Wiederkehr Zürcher Hochschule der

    Künste Master of Arts in Design Interaction Design 1
  2. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 Content and representation models for the exploration,

    evaluation and communication of personal financial information. Practice- and application-oriented (Type A) Supervised by Prof. Dr. Gerhard Buurman and Dr. Karmen Franinović 2 Visual Instruments for Personal Finances
  3. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 01 PROCESS 3

  4. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 Theoretical Framework User Activities «How do I

    have to change my spending to achieve [g]?» Interaction Techniques Select, Encode, Filter, … Interaction Attributes Continuity, Directness, Movement, … Evaluation Questions Data exploration, Hypothesis generation, Decision making, … 4
  5. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 Most important findings Focus on one user

    context Decided to focus on «leasure» and this has impact on the user activities and the visual and functional design of the application. Flesh out the prototypes based on the user activities In order to be able to test interaction techniques and attributes. Too many visualization attributes to consider them all Based on the research questions and considering the user context, the following are most important: Directness, movement, speed and proximity. 5
  6. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 02 RESULTS 6

  7. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 User Context 7

  8. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 User Activities How does a reduction of

    [a] impact my wealth? How does an increase in [b] impact my wealth? How would my liquidity look like in the case of [c]? Can I afford to buy [d]? When can I afford to increase my spending for [e]? How much do I spend on [f]? How do I have to change my spending to achieve [g]? Do other people spend as much as I am on [h] If I didn't do [i], how would my wealth look like? … 8
  9. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 How much do I spend on [f]?

    9
  10. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 How much do I spend on [f]?

    9
  11. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 Do other people spend as much as

    I am on [h] 10
  12. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 How do I have to change my

    spending to achieve [g]? 11
  13. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 How does a reduction / increase of

    [a] impact my wealth? 12
  14. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 How would my liquidity look like in

    the case of [c]? 13
  15. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 When can I afford to increase my

    spending for [e]? 14
  16. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 Interaction Techniques Select: mark something as interesting

    Explore: show me something else Reconfigure: show me a different arrangement Encode: show me a different representation Level of Detail: show me more or less detail Filter: show me something conditionally Connect: show me related items 15 J. S. Yi, Y. A. Kang, J. T. Stasko, and J. A. Jacko, “Toward a Deeper Understanding of the Role of Interaction in Information Visualization,” Visualization and Computer Graphics, IEEE Transactions on, vol. 13, no. 6.
  17. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 Demo 16

  18. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 Interaction Attributes Directness: indirect → direct Movement:

    static → dynamic Proximity: precise → proximate Speed: delaying → rapid Connectivity: independent → networked Continuity: discrete → continuous Orderliness: random → orderly Proximity: precise → proximate Pace: slow → fast Resolution: scarce → dense State: fixed vs. changing Time-depth: concurrent → sequential 17 Y.-K. Lim, E. Stolterman, H. Jung, and J. Donaldson, “Interaction gestalt and the design of aesthetic interactions,” presented at the DPPI '07: Proceedings of the 2007 conference on Designing pleasurable products and interfaces, 2007.
  19. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 Demo 18

  20. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 03 GOALS 19

  21. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 Goals for the Instrument Toolbox Small and

    simple applications that are able to answer specific questions individually. Format The right format feels less like work and more like enterntainment, exploration, play, challenge. User Experience The user should feel comfortable navigating his information and answering his questions. 20
  22. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 Goals for the Principles Applicable The design

    principles can be embedded in the information visualization design process. Verified The design principles are veryfied and tested by a group of practitioners. State of the Art The design principles are in line with the current research and literature. 21 Pontis, S., 2010. Methodological approaches for diagramming information. Pontis, S., 2009. Design method for mapping complex information (MapCI). Kirk, A., 2013. Data Visualization: A Successful Design Process.
  23. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 03 DISCUSSION 22

  24. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 Self-assessment Theoretical work The thesis is not

    as far as I would like it to be. Technical work The development progresses fine but getting and working with data is a bit of a challenge. 23
  25. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 04 SCHEDULE 24

  26. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 1. Coordination 2. Definition 3. Preparation 4.

    Investigation 5. Conception 6. Development 7. Evaluation 8. Presentation 25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  27. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 Next steps Instrument Conduct user experiments with

    the test environment. Evaluation and iteration of the prototypes and the test environment. Within the next days, I will roll out more experiments to a group of users that I haven’t talked to. Principles Identify the design principles. Formulate how to apply them. Discuss them with the group of practitioners and my mentors. 26
  28. Benjamin Wiederkehr, 18.01.2013 Thanks! 27