An Introduction to PubMed and MeSH

An Introduction to PubMed and MeSH

A brief(ish) tutorial on using MeSH to search PubMed. Not a substitute for talking to a flesh-and-blood librarian.

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Zach Sharrow

March 29, 2012
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Transcript

  1. AN INTRODUCTION TO PUBMED AND MESH

  2. IS A DATABASE OF MEDICAL LITERATURE DEVELOPED BY THE NATIONAL

    LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. IT INDEXES OVER 5,500 JOURNALS AND COMPRISES OVER 21 MILLION JOURNAL ARTICLES AND BOOKS.
  3. IS UPDATED ALMOST EVERY DAY

  4. IS UPDATED ALMOST EVERY DAY INCLUDES ARTICLES FROM AS FAR

    BACK AS THE 1940S
  5. IS UPDATED ALMOST EVERY DAY INCLUDES ARTICLES FROM AS FAR

    BACK AS THE 1940S COVERS TOPICS IN THE CLINICAL AND BASIC SCIENCES
  6. MESH

  7. MESH =

  8. MESH = MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS

  9. MESH = MeSH terms represent concepts found in the medical

    literature. They are used to describe articles in PubMed.
  10. MESH = COOL

  11. MESH = COOL (Because it can help you find things

    in PubMed.)
  12. FROM THE SEARCH BAR

  13. USE THE DROPDOWN MENU

  14. TO SELECT MeSH

  15. veterinary medicine AND SEARCH FOR TERMS prions

  16. None
  17. let’s break this down

  18. None
  19. This is the scope note: it defines how the term

    is used by MeSH.
  20. This is the scope note: it defines how the term

    is used by MeSH. Words in caps are other MeSH terms.
  21. None
  22. Using subheadings narrows the results to specific aspects of the

    concept. You can also choose to get only articles that have a major focus on the concept.
  23. None
  24. Entry terms are other words used for the same concept.

    Previous indexing shows older terms—you can use them to find older articles dealing with this concept.
  25. The tree at the bottom shows how this term is

    related to other terms. They follow a hierarchical structure.
  26. None
  27. The search builder is, naturally, used to build searches using

    MeSH terms.
  28. The search builder is, naturally, used to build searches using

    MeSH terms. Here’s how.
  29. First, check off any subheadings or other restrictions you want

    to use. (If you don’t check any, it will just use the main term.)
  30. ...Choose the operator you want… (“and” = narrow “or” =

    broaden “not” = exclude)
  31. …and click “add to search builder.”

  32. …and click “add to search builder.”

  33. You can add multiple terms from multiple searches using the

    same steps. The search builder will keep track of what you add each time.
  34. None
  35. That’s all for now.

  36. Slideshow created by Zach Sharrow Health Sciences Librarian Lincoln Memorial

    University zachary.sharrow@lmunet.edu Use your new powers wisely.