Service Design for the Enterprise Ecosystem

Service Design for the Enterprise Ecosystem

Workshop at Enterprise UX 2016

0f6ccdd935ce93750fcc527764c7abfc?s=128

Andy Polaine

June 10, 2016
Tweet

Transcript

  1. SERVICE DESIGN FOR THE ENTERPRISE ECOSYSTEM ENTERPRISE UX 2016 ANDY

    POLAINE SAN ANTONIO| 10TH JUNE 2016
  2. HELLO! 2 Find me here: @apolaine andy.polaine@fjordnet.com andy@polaine.com Handouts: http://pln.me/eux16

  3. 3 HASHTAG #EUX16

  4. Welcome and introduction ice-breaker The problem with sketching services Your

    challenge, your brand Starting from insights Coffee Break Journey mapping and blueprinting I Lunch Journey mapping and blueprinting II Round Robin Concept Cards Coffee Break Cost/value arc Concept poster Concept poster pitches 4 THE DAY AHEAD 9:00 9:15 9:45 10:00 10:30 11:00 12:30 13:00 14:00 14:20 15:00 15:00 15:20 16:00
  5. 5 LET’S GET STARTED WITH YOU

  6. THE CHALLENGE OF BOILING THE ENTERPRISE COMPLEXITY OCEAN 6

  7. 7 Services are complex and often full of intangible transitions

    key to their success or failure. Where can we look for inspiration of how to structure the process of their creation?
  8. THE ITERATIVE PROCESS OF FILMMAKING 8

  9. 9 FILMMAKING IS A MULTIDISCIPLINARY ACTIVITY

  10. 10 SCREENPLAYS ARE NOT MEANT TO BE READ BY THE

    AUDIENCE
  11. 11 HAN IS WHAT?

  12. 12 CONCEPT ART IS NOT MEANT TO BE SEEN BY

    THE AUDIENCE EARLY HAN SOLO CONCEPT SKETCH
  13. 13 EVEN THOUGH THEY ARE AMAZING ARTEFACTS

  14. 14 STORYBOARDS ARE NOT THE FINAL FILM

  15. 15 WHAT IS SHOT IS NOT THE FINAL FILM

  16. 16 THE FILM IS MADE & ITERATED IN THE EDIT

  17. 17 THE FILM TAKES ON A LIFE OF ITS OWN

    LIFE AFTER RELEASE
  18. 18 THE COMMUNITY FIXING WHAT THE DIRECTOR SCREWED UP

  19. 19 AN ASIDE ON AGILE’S DARK SIDE

  20. 20 STAND (UP) AND DELIVER!

  21. 21 MVP Minimal Viable Product It’s common practice to define

    a minimum viable product (MVP) which outlines sufficient features to launch a product to market. MLP Minimal Lovable Product We like to define a minimum lovable product (MLP). A lovable product drives adoption, loyalty and advocacy. + =
  22. 22 DOCUMENTATION ARTEFACTS ARE REALLY USEFUL FOR: DISCUSSION COMMUNICATING &

    UNDERSTANDING COMPLEXITY MAKING THE INTANGIBLE TANGIBLE TACIT/PASSIVE COMMUNICATION REPLACING TELEPATHY
  23. 23 THIS IS SERVICE DESIGNING (SORRY, IT LOOKS A BIT

    BORING DOESN’T IT?)
  24. 24 BUT OUR BLUEPRINTS, JOURNEY MAPS, PERSONAS, STATUS UPDATES, WIREFRAMES

    & DOCUMENTS ARE NOT THE SERVICE. THAT’S NOT AN OPERA HOUSE.
  25. 25 THIS IS AN OPERA HOUSE.

  26. 26 ONE DAY ALL THIS WILL BE IN THE BIN

  27. 27 SERVICES MANIFEST AS REAL THINGS (THAT NEED SERVICING)

  28. 28 What are Service Designers’ equivalents?

  29. 29 Sketching the platform, touchpointS, business model in a blueprint

    – IN SHORT, THE ENTERPRISE
  30. 30 ACTUALLY SKETCHING: STORYBOARDING AND PAPER PROTOTYPING

  31. 31 EXPERIENCE PROTOTYPING WITH TANGIBLE THINGS & REAL PEOPLE

  32. 32 THEN DOING IT OVER AND OVER AGAIN. AND THEN…

  33. 33 TESTING PILOTS, MICROPILOTS AND LAUNCHING IN FULL THEN TESTING

    AND STARTING THE DESIGN PROCESS AGAIN IT NEVER CEASES
  34. 34 This whole process is “sketching” services. WORKING AT The

    right level of detail at the right time is critical.
  35. 35 LET’S GET STARTED WITH A CHALLENGE

  36. 36 YOUR CHALLENGE –BRAND SWAP If was , what kind

    of service offering would it be? What would it look and feel like?
  37. 37 TERRITORY MAPPING

  38. 1. Working alone, create a list of everything you think

    is important about the service design challenge. One idea per post-it 2. Re-gather as a group and select a team leader to facilitate collaboration. 3. One by one, combine each post-it/idea into one overall map, grouping similar ideas to create clusters. Agree on clusters, and name them TERRITORY MAPPING
  39. AN INTEGRATED CELL AND CABLE SERVICE This map illustrates all

    the touchpoints and people involved in providing and using an integrated phone and cable service TERRITORY MAPPING EXAMPLE
  40. 40 THINK ABOUT (PRETTY MUCH IN THIS ORDER): - Customer/user

    needs (not wants) - Stakeholders - Value proposition - Brand values, aligned with needs - Business model - Tone of voice - Key touchpoints - Interactions with other channels & services
  41. 41 GO MAP YOUR TERRITORIES (10 MINS)

  42. 42 PSEUDO RESEARCH (BECAUSE WE ONLY HAVE SIX HOURS TO

    SAVE THE EARTH, FLASH)
  43. 43 THE HAND METHOD Helps you structure your approach, verification

    and the story of your pitch.
  44. What do you want to know? Who will tell you?

    WE WANT TO DO TO LEARN ABOUT 44 DEVELOP A HUNT STATEMENT
  45. 1. “I want the [service] to treat me fairly like

    a person, not a number” 2. “I want the process to be more transparent” 3. “I should be able to buy/book/access/change anything from any device/channel any time I want” 4. “I just want to communicate with one person or point of contact” 5. “The power relationship between the service and me should be equal and fair” 6. “The service experience should feel seamless/invisible/just work” 7. “Know me. Use past data/interactions and automagically integrate them into any future interactions” 8. “I want to be delighted” 9. “The service should help me do the [personal activity] that I want without getting in the way.” 10. “I want the service (or provider) to recognise when I need to feel special or for it to just work.” 45 10 GENERIC CHEATING INSIGHTS – (DON’t DO THIS AT HOME, KIDS!)
  46. 46 A FEW MORE Meta-level Yellow: Customer Blue: Staff Thanks

    to Eva Muller @Fjord!
  47. 47 IN THE BREAK, DISCUSS, BRAINSTORM, PLAN & EVEN DO

    SOME ACTUAL RESEARCH
  48. BREAK 48 (15 minutes)

  49. 49 ALIGNING BUSINESS VALUES TO NEEDS

  50. Observation EVIDENCE Observation “Quote” “Quote” Summary of the pattern INSIGHT

    Specific idea in response OPPORTUNITY /IDEA Specific idea in response Specific idea in response Specific idea in response Principle or value GUIDING PRINCIPLE 50 FOUR COLUMN SYNTHESIS METHOD
  51. Evidence from activity Insights Opportunity/Idea Brand Experience Touchpoint design concept

    “I was only a day late with my payment and they charged me $20 fee. I pay $120 a month already!” People want to be treated fairly Allow people-especially regular payers-a grace period. “We understand people’s lives are complicated and are there to help.” Cashflow a bit tight? Don’t worry - you can be up to five days late with your payment without penalty. My Nice Bank.com PAY NOW REMIND ME Brand experience and touchpoints are developed from real needs 51 Outside-in: Concepts & proposition align with insights & needs
  52. 52 CONCEPT ROUND ROBIN

  53. ROUND ROBIN Round robin is a method used to collaboratively

    develop rapid responses to service design opportunities by small teams. It is based on co-creation and encourages productive debate
  54. IMAGINE THE MOST AMAZING SERVICE EXPERIENCE YOUR INDUSTRY B COULD.

    THINK TANGIBLE IN-USE SCENARIO AND THE ECOSYSTEM.
  55. ROUND ROBIN PROCESS Each person writes the challenge in the

    top box Next, create an unconventional solution using sketches to document it in the same box Everyone passes the sheet to the right
  56. CONCEPT CARDS FOR ITERATION A template for communicating your ideas

    and also a way of quickly checking your idea for high level feasibility See: “atone” idea cards by Simon Clatworthy
  57. 57 DISCUSS & VOTE

  58. COST/VALUE RELATIONSHIPS Cost/value relationships quickly help prioritize service design concepts

    with a cost/value matrix and build understanding of trade-offs before moving concepts to implementation.
  59. OVERVIEW Cost/value relationships let service design team members easily explore,

    understand, and visualize where their concepts are in terms of “cost to deliver” and “value to the served.” This is done using a four-cell matrix. THIS METHOD WAS DEVELOPED WITH THE LUMA INSTITUTE. HTTP://WWW.LUMA-INSTITUTE.COM/
  60. 66 USING BLUEPRINTING & JOURNEY MAPPING

  61. 67 WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

  62. BLUEPRINTING helps us understand the building blocks of services and

    expose the processes that are part of delivering a service. It also enables us to connect the various components of a service to one another from frontstage to backstage. Blueprints aim to represent the service system. JOURNEY MAPPING Illustrates the journey of a person or type participating in a service over time. Other dimensions are sometimes added such as high points, breakdowns, emotions and touchpoints. THE ACTION LINE OF A BLUEPRINT IS THE CUSTOMER JOURNEY 68
  63. Blueprinting is a method for simultaneously depicting • the service

    process • the points of customer contact • the evidence of service from the key user’s point of view • The backstage services The concept of Service Blueprinting was developed in 1982 by G. Lynn Shostack and has been further refined and put into practice since then by researchers including M. J. Bitner, A.L. Ostrom and F. N. Morgan. 69 SERVICE BLUEPRINTING AND JOURNEY MAPPING
  64. The process is used to understand: • Expectations—from both the

    person and the provider’s point of view • Resources—what you have to work with or transform • Timing—how the experience unfolds over time • Complexity—system relationships Ideally, the blueprint enables you to step back and create both a customer journey map and system ecology diagram Carrie Chan, Justin Rheinfrank and team 70 DOCUMENTING THE CURRENT STATE IS CRITICAL TO UNDERSTANDING WHAT TO DO NEXT
  65. Typical blueprints include: - Customer Actions - Touchpoints/Channels - Staff

    Actions - Back Stage Staff - Support Processes Also illustrated sometimes: - lines of interaction - visibility - internal interaction - Time - Emotional states In 2007 Carrie Chan added emotion— others add questions, thoughts, business units, etc. http://thinkcarrie.com/enhancing-the-service-blueprint/ 71 BLUEPRINTS TYPICALLY USE “SWIM LANES”
  66. 72 JOURNEY OR EXPERIENCE MAPS ARE ABOUT THE INDIVIDUAL JOURNEY

    DETAILS
  67. HEPSI SERVICE BLUEPRINTING AND JOURNEY MAPPING 73 JOURNEY OR EXPERIENCE

    MAPS ARE ABOUT THE INDIVIDUAL JOURNEY DETAILS G AND JOURNEY MAPPING
  68. 74 It’s critical that they are driven by research (Quant

    and Qual)
  69. 75 MAP THE WHOLE SERVICE JOURNEY–IT USUALLY STARTS EARLIER &

    ENDS LATER THAN YOU THINK AND REVEALS MUCH OF THE ENTERPRISE IN THE PROCESS
  70. 76 LIKE THIS ONE FOR AN AIRLINE –LOW DETAIL, BIRD’s

    EYE VIEW
  71. Copenhagen interaction institute of design developed a blueprint designed to

    aid in concepting. This template is also a quick and easy way to get a sense of the scope of service design projects. Fjord Service Design Academy Service Design Methods Workshop Service Scenario+Blueprint SCENARIO On Post-it notes draw a scenario of a person engaged in the service experience. Draw each scene of the story on a separate Post-it. Remember to think about all the different stages of the service experience but pay particular attention to Designing for Love. SERVICE STAGE ATTRACT I become aware of the service REWARD I get extra benefits ADVOCATE OF COURSE. I find my ways of adapting and using and begin to suggest ‘you must try this service!’ LEARN WOW! I explore how it might work for me POST | AFTERGLOW I’m done or I’ve grown out of the service PRE-SERVICE COMMIT AHA! I get the service and try it EVALUATE Should I engage? TOUCHPOINTS (POINTS OF INTERACTION) Create little sketches of the touchpoints for each stage of the service journey The touchpoints can be anything people interact with during their experience. These can range from a website to a company delivery man and mobile to desktop to sensor. BACKSTAGE (OPERATIONAL PROVIDERS) Think of all the people that are needed to support the service experience. On this level write on post-its all the people that are not visible to the customer. E.g. a chef is very rarely seen by the customer, yet they are necessary to provide the experience expected in a restaurant. STAKEHOLDERS On this level write down all the organizations (e.g. partner companies) or people that could potentially be interested in implementing or impacting the service delivery. The more specific you can be the better! adapted from the CIID Concept blueprint tool 77 QUICK & DIRTY BLUEPRINT SCENARIO TEMPLATE FROM CIID
  72. Fjord Service Design Academy Service Design Methods Workshop Conventional Blueprint

    reference template EVIDENCE CUSTOMER THOUGHTS AND EMOTIONS SUPPORT PROCESSES AND SYSTEMS CUSTOMER ACTIONS TOUCHPOINT ONSTAGE PERSON PROVIDER PERSON SERVICE STAGE ATTRACT REWARD ADVOCATE LEARN COMMIT POST | AFTERGLOW PRE-SERVICE EVALUATE BACKSTAGE PERSON interaction visibility internal interactions 78 CIID BLUEPRINT TEMPLATE
  73. 79 BUT, BLUEPRINTING IS A DESIGN ACTIVITY, NOT JUST A

    DELIVERABLE
  74. 80 THE FRACTAL NATURE OF SERVICE DESIGN

  75. LOW LEVEL APIS & LIBRARIES ARE UX FOR PROGRAMMERS &

    ENGINEERS
  76. UI ELEMENT FINGERTIP

  77. UI CLUSTER FINGER

  78. APP HAND

  79. DEVICE Photo: iMore HANDS

  80. STORE WALLET

  81. ECOSYSTEM LIFE

  82. NETWORK LIVES

  83. NATIONAL REGULATORY SYSTEMS POPULATION

  84. GLOBALISATION & INTERNATIONAL LAW POPULATIONS & GOVERNMENTS

  85. CLIMATE CHANGE WEALTH POVERTY HEALTH DEVELOPMENT PEACE SECURITY TERRESTRIALS

  86. SPACE PHOTO: FLICKR USER HALFBEAK (AND YES, THAT’S LEGO) EXTRA

    TERRESTRIALS?
  87. 93 FROM OVERVIEW TO DETAIL AND BACK AGAIN

  88. LONG DOCUMENTS OBSCURE IMPORTANT CONNECTIONS 94

  89. YOU CANNOT DESIGN THE WHOLE THING AT THIS LEVEL OF

    DETAIL 95
  90. OVERVIEW WITH TIMELINE 96

  91. DETAIL VIEW, ABSTRACTED 97

  92. ALTERNATIVE JOURNEYS 98

  93. ALTERNATIVE JOURNEYS 99

  94. ALTERNATIVE JOURNEYS 100

  95. 101 DISCONNECTED TOUCHPOINTS WRECK THE ENTERPRISE ECOSYSTEM

  96. NICE TOUCHPOINT, NOW WHAT ABOUT THE REST OF THE EXPERIENCE?

  97. HI MYKI! YOU LOOK MODERN AND COOL. JUST TAP THEN?

  98. OH. OKAY.

  99. HOW ABOUT SWIPING? NO?

  100. WAVE IT ABOUT A BIT?

  101. PHOTO: JANINE SISSON SORRY, CAN’T QUITE READ THAT ANYMORE

  102. MAYBE THE MACHINE WILL HELP? OH DEAR.

  103. Source: http://ptv.vic.gov.au/tickets/myki/touching-on-and-off/ I’LL TRY THE OFFICIAL WEBSITE. OH.

  104. AHA! FINALLY. SLOW CARD READERS, HUH?

  105. Space shuttle launch $426 million Mars Rover mission $777 million

    Market value of Virgin Australia airline $1.46 billion Total assets of Ford Motor Company, Australia $1.5 billion Source: https://sites.google.com/site/cheaperthanmyki/home ORIGINAL BUDGET, AU$350 MILLION. AU$1.5 BILLION LATER…
  106. 113 ANATOMY OF A SERVICE BLUEPRINT

  107. TURN THIS STRUCTURE ON ITS SIDE…. 114

  108. SERVICE EXPERIENCES UNFOLD OVER TIME ACROSS MULTIPLE CHANNELS ENTERPRISE BACK-END

    SUPPORTS THE DELIVERY OF EXPERIENCE CHANGE PERSPECTIVE TO DELIVERY ACROSS TIME AND CHANNELS Diagram from Service Design: From Insight to Implementation by Andrew Polaine, Lavrans Løvlie, and Ben Reason 115
  109. AWARE JOIN USE DEVELOP LEAVE JOURN EY/ EXPERIEN CE A

    TYPICAL WEB PROJECT MIGHT BE JUST ONE CHANNEL 116
  110. AWARE JOIN USE DEVELOP LEAVE JOURN EY/ EXPERIEN CE BUT

    WHO IS DESIGNING THE REST? CONTEXT IS CRITICAL. 117
  111. ANALYSIS Mapping out the complexity and dependencies of an existing

    service, pulling in user insights and other research. Or as a template for which touchpoints to measure and how. BRAINSTORMING & IDEATION Take a starting point or overall concept and expand the discussion to think about the complexity and dependencies. Ideal in multi-disciplinary project teams. ECOSYSTEM MAP Using the blueprint as the overview doc in order to track and output customer journeys, storyboards, channel and touchpoint specs. Important: everything is done in the context of the overall service ecosystem. 118 Three MODES OF USING SERVICE BLUEPRINTS
  112. AWARE JOIN USE DEVELOP LEAVE JOURN EY/ EXPERIEN CE BASIC

    FORM IS A GRID. NAMES, CHANNELS, STEPS, ETC. CAN CHANGE 119
  113. USE A WHITE/BLACKBOARD (JAZZ HANDS ARE OPTIONAL) 120

  114. OR YOU CAN QUICKLY USE A SPREADSHEET TO CAPTURE DATA

    121
  115. YOU NEED POST-IT NOTES AND A LOT OF WALL SPACE

    122 Image from Service Design: From Insight to Implementation by Andrew Polaine, Lavrans Løvlie, and Ben Reason
  116. MAKE IT AS BIG AS YOU NEED - A0 OR

    A1 IS GOOD 123
  117. AWARE JOIN USE DEVELOP LEAVE JOURN EY/ EXPERIEN CE YOU

    CAN START BY DEFINING THE EXPERIENCE 124
  118. AWARE JOIN USE DEVELOP LEAVE JOURN EY/ EXPERIEN CE OR

    IDEATE FROM ONE KEY TOUCHPOINT IDEA OUTWARDS 125
  119. AWARE JOIN USE DEVELOP LEAVE JOURN EY/ EXPERIEN CE OR

    START BY POPULATING TOUCHPOINTS FROM ONE USER JOURNEY AND THEN EXPAND 126
  120. 127 BLUEPRINTING ACTIVITY START BY RE-IMAGINING A KEY TOUCHPOINT IN

    USE AND SPREAD OUT – STEP FORWARD AND BACK IN TIME AND ACROSS CHANNELS
  121. LUNCH (50 MINS PLEASE!) 128

  122. 129 I’VE MADE A BLUEPRINT, NOW WHAT? ITERATING FROM CONCEPT

    TO BLUEPRINT AND BACK AGAIN
  123. AWAR E JOI N USE DEVEL OP LEA VE JOUR

    NEY / EXPER IENCE CHOOSE KEY TOUCHPOINTS TO DEVELOP BASED ON INSIGHTS RESEARCH AND STRATEGY 130
  124. AWAR E JOI N USE DEVEL OP LEA VE JOUR

    NEY / EXPER IENCE TAKE SLICES THROUGH THE BLUEPRINT TO ANALYSE COHERENCY 131
  125. AWAR E JOI N USE DEVEL OP LEA VE JOUR

    NEY / EXPER IENCE MULTIPLE JOURNEYS CAN BE MAPPED OUT, EXPLORED AND EXAMINED 132
  126. 133 Image: Service Design: From Insight to Implementation by Andrew

    Polaine, Lavrans Løvlie, and Ben Reason BREAK OUT THOSE INDIVIDUAL JOURNEYS AS STORYBOARDS/SUMMARIES
  127. 134 Image: Service Design: From Insight to Implementation by Andrew

    Polaine, Lavrans Løvlie, and Ben Reason MORE DETAILED PHASE/STEP SUMMARIES START TO FORM WORKING REFERENCE DOCUMENTS
  128. 135 Image: Service Design: From Insight to Implementation by Andrew

    Polaine, Lavrans Løvlie, and Ben Reason WHOLE CHANNEL SPECIFICATIONS
  129. Image: Service Design: From Insight to Implementation by Andrew Polaine,

    Lavrans Løvlie, and Ben Reason 136 DESIGN SPECS OR PROTOTYPES FOR INDIVIDUAL TOUCHPOINTS IN THE CONTEXTOF THE WHOLE ECOLOGY
  130. CUSTOMER JOURNEYS ARE BROKEN DOWN INTO USER STORIES 137

  131. BREAK 140 (15 minutes)

  132. 149 A FUlLY-ROUNDED CONCEPT

  133. What are the most important costs inherent in our business

    model? Which Key Resources are most expensive? Which Key Activities are most expensive? ATeT]dTBcaTP\b Through which Channels do our Customer Segments want to be reached? How are we reaching them now? How are our Channels integrated? Which ones work best? Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? For what value are our customers really willing to pay? For what do they currently pay? How are they currently paying? How would they prefer to pay? How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues? 2WP]]T[b 2dbc^\TaAT[PcX^]bWX_b 2dbc^\TaBTV\T]cb RWP]]T[_WPbTb) 0fPaT]Tbb  7^fS^fTaPXbTPfPaT]TbbPQ^dc^daR^\_P]hzb_a^SdRcbP]SbTaeXRTb. !4eP[dPcX^]  7^fS^fTWT[_Rdbc^\TabTeP[dPcT^da^aVP]XiPcX^]zbEP[dT?a^_^bXcX^]. "?daRWPbT  7^fS^fTP[[^fRdbc^\Tabc^_daRWPbTb_TRX R_a^SdRcbP]SbTaeXRTb. #3T[XeTah  7^fS^fTST[XeTaPEP[dT?a^_^bXcX^]c^Rdbc^\Tab. $0UcTabP[Tb  7^fS^fT_a^eXST_^bc_daRWPbTRdbc^\Tabd__^ac. <Pbb<PaZTc =XRWT<PaZTc BTV\T]cTS 3XeTabX TS <d[cXbXSTS?[PcU^a\ TgP\_[Tb ?Tab^]P[PbbXbcP]RT 3TSXRPcTS?Tab^]P[0bbXbcP]RT BT[UBTaeXRT 0dc^\PcTSBTaeXRTb 2^\\d]XcXTb 2^RaTPcX^] For whom are we creating value? Who are our most important customers? What type of relationship does each of our Customer Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Which ones have we established? How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? How costly are they? EP[dT?a^_^bXcX^]b :Th0RcXeXcXTb :Th?Pac]Tab :ThATb^daRTb 2^bcBcadRcdaT What value do we deliver to the customer? Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Which customer needs are we satisfying? What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? Our Distribution Channels? Customer Relationships? Revenue streams? Who are our Key Partners? Who are our key suppliers? Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Which Key Activities do partners perform? What Key Resources do our Value Propositions require? Our Distribution Channels? Customer Relationships? Revenue Streams? RWPaPRcTaXbcXRb =Tf]Tbb ?TaU^a\P]RT 2dbc^\XiPcX^] {6TccX]VcWT9^Q3^]T| 3TbXV] 1aP]SBcPcdb ?aXRT 2^bcATSdRcX^] AXbZATSdRcX^] 0RRTbbXQX[Xch 2^]eT]XT]RTDbPQX[Xch RPcTV^aXTb ?a^SdRcX^] ?a^Q[T\B^[eX]V ?[PcU^a\=Tcf^aZ ch_Tb^UaTb^daRTb ?WhbXRP[ 8]cT[[TRcdP[QaP]S_PcT]cbR^_haXVWcbSPcP 7d\P] 5X]P]RXP[ \^cXePcX^]bU^a_Pac]TabWX_b) >_cX\XiPcX^]P]STR^]^\h ATSdRcX^]^UaXbZP]Sd]RTacPX]ch 0R`dXbXcX^]^U_PacXRd[PaaTb^daRTbP]SPRcXeXcXTb Xbh^daQdbX]Tbb\^aT) 2^bc3aXeT][TP]TbcR^bcbcadRcdaT[^f_aXRTeP[dT_a^_^bXcX^]\PgX\d\Pdc^\PcX^]TgcT]bXeT^dcb^daRX]V EP[dT3aXeT]U^RdbTS^]eP[dTRaTPcX^]_aT\Xd\eP[dT_a^_^bXcX^] bP\_[TRWPaPRcTaXbcXRb) 5XgTS2^bcbbP[PaXTbaT]cbdcX[XcXTb EPaXPQ[TR^bcb 4R^]^\XTb^UbRP[T 4R^]^\XTb^UbR^_T fffQdbX]Tbb\^ST[VT]TaPcX^]R^\ CWT1dbX]Tbb<^ST[2P]ePb >]) 8cTaPcX^]) 3TbXV]TSQh) 3TbXV]TSU^a) Day Month Year No. ch_Tb) 0bbTcbP[T DbPVTUTT BdQbRaX_cX^]5TTb ;T]SX]VAT]cX]V;TPbX]V ;XRT]bX]V 1a^ZTaPVTUTTb 0SeTacXbX]V gTS_aXRX]V ;Xbc?aXRT ?a^SdRcUTPcdaTST_T]ST]c 2dbc^\TabTV\T]cST_T]ST]c E^[d\TST_T]ST]c Sh]P\XR_aXRX]V =TV^cXPcX^]QPaVPX]X]V HXT[S<P]PVT\T]c ATP[cX\T<PaZTc This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. 150 BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS
  134. What are the most important costs inherent in our business

    model? Which Key Resources are most expensive? Which Key Activities are most expensive? ATeT]dTBcaTP\b Through which Channels do our Customer Segments want to be reached? How are we reaching them now? How are our Channels integrated? Which ones work best? Which ones are most cost-efficient? How are we integrating them with customer routines? For what value are our customers really willing to pay? For what do they currently pay? How are they currently paying? How would they prefer to pay? How much does each Revenue Stream contribute to overall revenues? 2WP]]T[b 2dbc^\TaAT[PcX^]bWX_b 2dbc^\TaBTV\T]cb RWP]]T[_WPbTb) 0fPaT]Tbb  7^fS^fTaPXbTPfPaT]TbbPQ^dc^daR^\_P]hzb_a^SdRcbP]SbTaeXRTb. !4eP[dPcX^]  7^fS^fTWT[_Rdbc^\TabTeP[dPcT^da^aVP]XiPcX^]zbEP[dT?a^_^bXcX^]. "?daRWPbT  7^fS^fTP[[^fRdbc^\Tabc^_daRWPbTb_TRX R_a^SdRcbP]SbTaeXRTb. #3T[XeTah  7^fS^fTST[XeTaPEP[dT?a^_^bXcX^]c^Rdbc^\Tab. $0UcTabP[Tb  7^fS^fT_a^eXST_^bc_daRWPbTRdbc^\Tabd__^ac. <Pbb<PaZTc =XRWT<PaZTc BTV\T]cTS 3XeTabX TS <d[cXbXSTS?[PcU^a\ TgP\_[Tb ?Tab^]P[PbbXbcP]RT 3TSXRPcTS?Tab^]P[0bbXbcP]RT BT[UBTaeXRT 0dc^\PcTSBTaeXRTb 2^\\d]XcXTb 2^RaTPcX^] For whom are we creating value? Who are our most important customers? What type of relationship does each of our Customer Segments expect us to establish and maintain with them? Which ones have we established? How are they integrated with the rest of our business model? How costly are they? EP[dT?a^_^bXcX^]b :Th0RcXeXcXTb :Th?Pac]Tab :ThATb^daRTb 2^bcBcadRcdaT What value do we deliver to the customer? Which one of our customer’s problems are we helping to solve? What bundles of products and services are we offering to each Customer Segment? Which customer needs are we satisfying? What Key Activities do our Value Propositions require? Our Distribution Channels? Customer Relationships? Revenue streams? Who are our Key Partners? Who are our key suppliers? Which Key Resources are we acquiring from partners? Which Key Activities do partners perform? What Key Resources do our Value Propositions require? Our Distribution Channels? Customer Relationships? Revenue Streams? RWPaPRcTaXbcXRb =Tf]Tbb ?TaU^a\P]RT 2dbc^\XiPcX^] {6TccX]VcWT9^Q3^]T| 3TbXV] 1aP]SBcPcdb ?aXRT 2^bcATSdRcX^] AXbZATSdRcX^] 0RRTbbXQX[Xch 2^]eT]XT]RTDbPQX[Xch RPcTV^aXTb ?a^SdRcX^] ?a^Q[T\B^[eX]V ?[PcU^a\=Tcf^aZ ch_Tb^UaTb^daRTb ?WhbXRP[ 8]cT[[TRcdP[QaP]S_PcT]cbR^_haXVWcbSPcP 7d\P] 5X]P]RXP[ \^cXePcX^]bU^a_Pac]TabWX_b) >_cX\XiPcX^]P]STR^]^\h ATSdRcX^]^UaXbZP]Sd]RTacPX]ch 0R`dXbXcX^]^U_PacXRd[PaaTb^daRTbP]SPRcXeXcXTb Xbh^daQdbX]Tbb\^aT) 2^bc3aXeT][TP]TbcR^bcbcadRcdaT[^f_aXRTeP[dT_a^_^bXcX^]\PgX\d\Pdc^\PcX^]TgcT]bXeT^dcb^daRX]V EP[dT3aXeT]U^RdbTS^]eP[dTRaTPcX^]_aT\Xd\eP[dT_a^_^bXcX^] bP\_[TRWPaPRcTaXbcXRb) 5XgTS2^bcbbP[PaXTbaT]cbdcX[XcXTb EPaXPQ[TR^bcb 4R^]^\XTb^UbRP[T 4R^]^\XTb^UbR^_T fffQdbX]Tbb\^ST[VT]TaPcX^]R^\ CWT1dbX]Tbb<^ST[2P]ePb >]) 8cTaPcX^]) 3TbXV]TSQh) 3TbXV]TSU^a) Day Month Year No. ch_Tb) 0bbTcbP[T DbPVTUTT BdQbRaX_cX^]5TTb ;T]SX]VAT]cX]V;TPbX]V ;XRT]bX]V 1a^ZTaPVTUTTb 0SeTacXbX]V gTS_aXRX]V ;Xbc?aXRT ?a^SdRcUTPcdaTST_T]ST]c 2dbc^\TabTV\T]cST_T]ST]c E^[d\TST_T]ST]c Sh]P\XR_aXRX]V =TV^cXPcX^]QPaVPX]X]V HXT[S<P]PVT\T]c ATP[cX\T<PaZTc This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. BACK STAGE 151 BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS FRONT STAGE $$$
  135. Concept posters help teams envision opportunities for and evaluate a

    service quickly. They provide an overview and just enough detail to make decisions about the value of moving forward with a concept. 152 CONCEPT POSTER
  136. Once a service concept is fairly well defined, a concept

    poster can be a great way to create an overview of the concept to share with others for discussion and evaluation. Posters can consist of categories like concept name, key stakeholders, features and benefits, value statements, unmet user needs, pricing, time to develop, cost to develop, and a sketched illustration. As a poster, they provide an overview and just enough detail to make decisions about the value of moving forward with a concept. 153 OVERVIEW
  137. 1. Choose a documenter 2. Explore each section of the

    template (name, value/benefit, stakeholders, etc.)and sketch out all the components on smaller paper before committing to the larger poster. 3. Discuss, review, and refine 4. Transfer all the components to the poster 5. Quickly and succinctly present to to the overall team 6. Vote on aspects of the concepts that have the most potential once they’ve been presented 154 PROCESS
  138. 155 GO CREATE YOUR CONCEPTS POSTERS! PITCH WILL BE 2

    MINS PER TEAM
  139. 156 PITCH TIME – 2 MINS ONLY!

  140. 157 WHAT’s MISSING? - Clients - Rich context (we faked

    all the research) - Multiple journeys - Business case and analysis - Iterations to final designs & delivery - Validation - Complexity - Legacy service infrastructure - Measurement
  141. 158 BUT NOW YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE LOOKING FOR,

    WHICH HELPS
  142. PHEW! THANK YOU