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Dean's Colloquium - UT Dallas 2017

Cassini Nazir
September 08, 2017

Dean's Colloquium - UT Dallas 2017

Presentation to Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication faculty on Sept. 8, 2017 on a summer workshop with design faculty.

Cassini Nazir

September 08, 2017
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  1. Cassini Nazir
    Clinical Associate Professor
    Sept. 8, 2017
    Dean’s Colloquium

    View Slide

  2. A workshop enabled faculty to better understand new pathways and curriculum,
    and how students might navigate through.
    You've got to know 

    when to hold ‘em.
    Know when to fold ‘em.
    ATCM 2300
    Introduction to Technoculture
    CE 1337
    Computer Science I

    View Slide

  3. Of the 122 undergraduate classes listed in the new 2017 catalog …
    Advanced Emerging Media Production
    Animation Studio I
    Animation Studio II
    Animation for Games
    Audience Analysis
    Audio Productions Lab I
    Audio Productions Lab II
    Audio Technologies
    Capstone Project
    Character Design
    Children and Media
    Code and Culture
    Communicating Social Science
    Communication and Social Science
    Theories
    Communication, Media, and
    Information Technology
    Computer Animation I
    Computer Animation II
    Computer Animation III
    Computer Animation Processes
    Computer Imaging
    Computer Modeling for Digital
    Fabrication
    Critical Making
    Design I
    Design II
    Design Research Methods
    Digital Activism
    Digital Audio Processing
    Digital Content Design
    Digital Fabrication Studio I
    Digital Fabrication Studio II
    Digital Inequalities
    Digital Sculpting
    Digital Video Production I
    Digital Video Production II
    Digital Writing
    Disability, Technology, and Media
    Emerging Media Production
    Emerging Media and the Digital
    Economy
    Ethics in New Media, Technology, and
    Communication
    Exploration of Arts and Technology
    Feminism, Technology, and Media
    Freshman Seminar
    Game Design Fundamentals
    Game Design I
    Game Design II
    Game Design III
    Game Production Lab I
    Game Production Lab II
    Game Studies I
    Game Systems Design
    Games and Narrative I
    Games and Narrative II
    Historical Perspectives on Emerging
    Media
    History of Games
    Human Communication Online
    Independent Study in Arts and
    Technology
    Interaction Design I
    Interaction Design II
    Internet Studio I
    Internet Studio II
    Intervention Design and Testing
    Introduction to Technoculture
    Journalism in the Networked Age
    Level Design I
    Level Design II
    Lighting and Composition I
    Lighting and Composition II
    Media Archeology
    Media Psychology
    Media Structures, Regulations, and
    Policies
    Media and Communication Research
    Theories I
    Media and Communication Research
    Theories II
    Message Effects Research Design
    Modeling and Texturing I
    Modeling and Texturing II
    Motion Capture Animation
    Motion Graphics
    Motion Graphics II
    Networked Identities
    News and Public Opinion
    Persuasion and Digital Media
    Political Communication
    Pre-Production Design I
    Pre-Production Design II
    Privacy and Surveillance
    Procedural Animation
    Project Management for Arts and
    Technology I
    Project Management for Arts and
    Technology II
    Projection Mapping Studio
    Qualitative Communication Research
    Methods
    Queer Technology and Media
    Race, Technology, and Media
    Reading Media Critically
    Reading in a Networked Era
    Rigging I
    Rigging II
    Scripting for Games I
    Scripting for Games II
    Senior Honors in Arts and Technology
    Senior Seminar
    Social Networks
    Sound Design
    Sound Design for Games and
    Interactive Media
    Special Effects
    Special Topics in Arts and Technology
    Storytelling for New Media I
    Storytelling for New Media II
    Strategic Design
    Survey of Digital Fabrication
    Theories EMAC
    Tools Development for Arts and
    Technology
    Topics in Animation
    Topics in Art and Technology
    Topics in Emerging Media and
    Communications
    Topics in Game Development
    Topics in Mediated Communication
    Topics in Sound Design
    User Experience Design for Games I
    Virtual Environments
    Virtual Environments II
    World Building
    Writing and Research EMAC

    View Slide

  4. Of the 122 undergraduate classes listed in the new 2017 catalog,

    almost a third are new courses.
    Advanced Emerging Media Production
    Animation Studio I
    Animation Studio II
    Animation for Games
    Audience Analysis
    Audio Productions Lab I
    Audio Productions Lab II
    Audio Technologies
    Capstone Project
    Character Design
    Children and Media
    Code and Culture
    Communicating Social Science
    Communication and Social Science
    Theories
    Communication, Media, and
    Information Technology
    Computer Animation I
    Computer Animation II
    Computer Animation III
    Computer Animation Processes
    Computer Imaging
    Computer Modeling for Digital
    Fabrication
    Critical Making
    Design I
    Design II
    Design Research Methods
    Digital Activism
    Digital Audio Processing
    Digital Content Design
    Digital Fabrication Studio I
    Digital Fabrication Studio II
    Digital Inequalities
    Digital Sculpting
    Digital Video Production I
    Digital Video Production II
    Digital Writing
    Disability, Technology, and Media
    Emerging Media Production
    Emerging Media and the Digital
    Economy
    Ethics in New Media, Technology, and
    Communication
    Exploration of Arts and Technology
    Feminism, Technology, and Media
    Freshman Seminar
    Game Design Fundamentals
    Game Design I
    Game Design II
    Game Design III
    Game Production Lab I
    Game Production Lab II
    Game Studies I
    Game Systems Design
    Games and Narrative I
    Games and Narrative II
    Historical Perspectives on Emerging
    Media
    History of Games
    Human Communication Online
    Independent Study in Arts and
    Technology
    Interaction Design I
    Interaction Design II
    Internet Studio I
    Internet Studio II
    Intervention Design and Testing
    Introduction to Technoculture
    Journalism in the Networked Age
    Level Design I
    Level Design II
    Lighting and Composition I
    Lighting and Composition II
    Media Archeology
    Media Psychology
    Media Structures, Regulations, and
    Policies
    Media and Communication Research
    Theories I
    Media and Communication Research
    Theories II
    Message Effects Research Design
    Modeling and Texturing I
    Modeling and Texturing II
    Motion Capture Animation
    Motion Graphics
    Motion Graphics II
    Networked Identities
    News and Public Opinion
    Persuasion and Digital Media
    Political Communication
    Pre-Production Design I
    Pre-Production Design II
    Privacy and Surveillance
    Procedural Animation
    Project Management for Arts and
    Technology I
    Project Management for Arts and
    Technology II
    Projection Mapping Studio
    Qualitative Communication Research
    Methods
    Queer Technology and Media
    Race, Technology, and Media
    Reading Media Critically
    Reading in a Networked Era
    Rigging I
    Rigging II
    Scripting for Games I
    Scripting for Games II
    Senior Honors in Arts and Technology
    Senior Seminar
    Social Networks
    Sound Design
    Sound Design for Games and
    Interactive Media
    Special Effects
    Special Topics in Arts and Technology
    Storytelling for New Media I
    Storytelling for New Media II
    Strategic Design
    Survey of Digital Fabrication
    Theories EMAC
    Tools Development for Arts and
    Technology
    Topics in Animation
    Topics in Art and Technology
    Topics in Emerging Media and
    Communications
    Topics in Game Development
    Topics in Mediated Communication
    Topics in Sound Design
    User Experience Design for Games I
    Virtual Environments
    Virtual Environments II
    World Building
    Writing and Research EMAC

    View Slide

  5. A second iteration of the workshop gave us more details
    about the courses and their contexts.

    View Slide

  6. 2 2
    2
    Major Requirements
    Lower-Level
    1 of 8
    2
    Major Requirements
    Lower-Level
    2 of 8
    ATCM 2300
    Introduction to Technoculture
    In this foundational course students consider about
    the complex relationship between technology and
    culture. They will study evocative objects to raise
    questions about the history, impact, and implications
    of the co-evolution of technology and society.
    PREREQ —
    NEW
    A second iteration of the workshop gave us more details
    about the courses and their contexts.
    Title
    Description
    Prerequisites
    New course
    Pathway
    Total number of
    courses req’d
    Catalog section
    Course number
    Counts toward
    Core Curriculum
    14 classes
    1
    Lower Level
    Major
    Requirements
    8 classes
    2
    Upper Level
    Major
    Requirements
    8 classes
    Lower Level
    Major
    Requirements
    8 classes
    Upper Level
    Major
    Requirements
    8 classes
    2
    Prescribed
    Electives
    5 classes
    2
    Free Electives
    5 classes
    4o total classes
    5

    View Slide

  7. A picture emerged of how students navigate through …
    ATCM 2300
    Introduction to Technoculture
    ATCM 2301
    Computer Imaging
    CE 1335
    Computer Science I
    ATCM 2302
    Design I
    ATEC Foundation
    ATCM 1316
    Drawing Foundations
    ATCM 2303
    Project Management
    for ATEC I
    ATCM 2305
    Computer Animation Processes
    CS 2335
    Computer Science II
    for Non-majors
    Animation
    ATCM 2320
    Critical Media Research
    Foundations
    ATCM 2322
    Media History
    ATCM 2321
    Reading Media Critically
    ATCM 2335
    Internet Studio I
    Critical Media Studies
    ATCM 2304
    Exploration of ATEC
    or
    ATCM 2355 Survey of Digital Fabrication
    ATCM 2365 Game Design Fundamentals
    ATCM 2305 Computer Animation Processes
    ATCM 2303
    Project Management
    for ATEC I
    ATCM 2322
    Media History
    or
    ATCM 2322 Reading Media Critically
    ATCM 2335
    Internet Studio I
    Design and Production
    ATCM 1316
    Drawing Foundations
    ATCM 2303
    Project Management
    for ATEC I
    ATCM 2365
    Game Design Fundamentals
    CS 2335
    Computer Science II
    for Non-majors
    Game Studies
    ATCM 2380
    Communication and Social
    Science Theories
    PSY 2301
    Introduction to Psychology
    ATCM 2385
    Media and Communication
    Research Methods I
    PSY 2301
    Statistics for Psychology
    Mediated Communication
    Every ATEC student takes these four foundational courses.
    2 The student begins foundational work in one of the five ATEC pathways.
    1

    View Slide

  8. And the pathway options available to students.
    ATCM 2300
    Introduction to Technoculture
    ATCM 2301
    Computer Imaging
    CE 1335
    Computer Science I
    ATCM 2302
    Design I
    ATEC Foundation
    ATCM 1316
    Drawing Foundations
    ATCM 2303
    Project Management
    for ATEC I
    ATCM 2305
    Computer Animation Processes
    CS 2335
    Computer Science II
    for Non-majors
    Animation
    ATCM 2320
    Critical Media Research
    Foundations
    ATCM 2322
    Media History
    ATCM 2321
    Reading Media Critically
    ATCM 2335
    Internet Studio I
    Critical Media Studies
    ATCM 2304
    Exploration of ATEC
    or
    ATCM 2355 Survey of Digital Fabrication
    ATCM 2365 Game Design Fundamentals
    ATCM 2305 Computer Animation Processes
    ATCM 2303
    Project Management
    for ATEC I
    ATCM 2322
    Media History
    or
    ATCM 2322 Reading Media Critically
    ATCM 2335
    Internet Studio I
    Design and Production
    ATCM 1316
    Drawing Foundations
    ATCM 2303
    Project Management
    for ATEC I
    ATCM 2365
    Game Design Fundamentals
    CS 2335
    Computer Science II
    for Non-majors
    Game Studies
    ATCM 2380
    Communication and Social
    Science Theories
    PSY 2301
    Introduction to Psychology
    ATCM 2385
    Media and Communication
    Research Methods I
    PSY 2301
    Statistics for Psychology
    Mediated Communication
    Every ATEC student takes these four foundational courses.
    2 The student begins foundational work in one of the five ATEC pathways.
    1

    View Slide

  9. We then began thinking about how to understand structuring and sequencing of courses,
    with an eye toward pathways.
    Freshman
    Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior
    Fall
    1 Spring
    2 Fall
    3 Spring
    4 Fall
    5 Spring
    6 Fall
    7 Spring
    8
    ATCM 2300
    Introduction to Technoculture
    ATCM 2301
    Computer Imaging
    CE 1335
    Computer Science I
    ATCM 2302
    Design I
    ATCM xxx
    Pathway Exploration 1 of 4
    1 of 14
    Core
    4 of 14
    Core
    2 of 14
    Core
    5 of 14
    Core
    3 of 14
    Core
    ATCM xxx
    Pathway Foundation 2 of 4
    ATCM xxx
    Pathway Foundation 4 of 4
    ATCM xxx
    Upper Level
    1 of 8
    ATCM xxx
    Pathway Foundation 3 of 4
    ATCM xxx
    Upper Level
    2 of 8
    6 of 14
    Core
    9 of 14
    Core
    7 of 14
    Core
    10 of 14
    Core
    8 of 14
    Core
    ATCM xxx
    Upper Level
    7 of 8
    ATCM xxx
    Capstone
    8 of 8
    3 of 5
    Prescribed Elective
    2 of 5
    Prescribed Elective
    4 of 5
    Prescribed Elective
    14 of 14
    Core
    5 of 5
    Prescribed Elective
    3 of 5
    Free Elective
    5 of 5
    Free Elective
    4 of 5
    Free Elective
    ATCM xxx
    Upper Level
    3 of 8
    ATCM xxx
    Upper Level
    5 of 8
    ATCM xxx
    Upper Level
    6 of 8
    ATCM xxx
    Upper Level
    4 of 8
    1 of 5
    Prescribed Elective
    11 of 14
    Core
    13 of 14
    Core
    12 of 14
    Core
    2 of 5
    Free Elective
    1 of 5
    Free Elective
    Foundation Pathway
    Pathway
    Pathway
    Pathway Entrance Pathway
    Pathway Focus

    View Slide

  10. Electronic Learning Portfolios engage students in continuous reflection and collaboration
    focused on evidence-based learning.
    Image, Object Prototype Presentation
    Research Paper Audio, Video Game Code
    Reflection piece

    View Slide

  11. Course artifacts have a permanent home in the Electronic Learning Portfolio,
    enabled by the learning management platform.

    View Slide

  12. Course artifacts have a permanent home in the LMS

    View Slide

  13. This enables connections in classes the student takes over time.

    View Slide

  14. A total of 540 students are currently in ATEC foundation courses.
    Data retrieved August 25, 2017
    201
    202
    203
    204
    205
    206
    207
    208
    209
    210
    211
    212
    001
    002
    003
    004
    005
    006
    501
    502
    503
    001
    002
    003
    004
    005
    006
    501
    502
    001
    002
    Computer

    Science
    112 students
    2 sections
    Design I
    240 students
    8 sections
    Computer

    Imaging
    267 students
    9 sections
    Technoculture
    297 students
    12 sections

    View Slide

  15. Very few students (6%) are taking Computer Science in their first semester.
    Computer

    Science
    112 students
    2 sections
    Design I
    240 students
    8 sections
    Computer

    Imaging
    267 students
    9 sections
    Technoculture
    297 students
    12 sections
    Data retrieved August 25, 2017

    View Slide

  16. A majority of Computer Imaging students (70%) are also taking Technocultures.
    Computer

    Science
    112 students
    2 sections
    Design I
    240 students
    8 sections
    Computer

    Imaging
    267 students
    9 sections
    Technoculture
    297 students
    12 sections
    Data retrieved August 25, 2017

    View Slide

  17. About 30% of Design 1 students are also taking Computer Imaging.
    Computer

    Science
    112 students
    2 sections
    Design I
    240 students
    8 sections
    Computer

    Imaging
    267 students
    9 sections
    Technoculture
    297 students
    12 sections
    Data retrieved August 25, 2017

    View Slide

  18. Who students learn with is just as important as what they learn.
    Computer

    Science
    112 students
    2 sections
    Design I
    240 students
    8 sections
    Computer

    Imaging
    267 students
    9 sections
    Technoculture
    297 students
    12 sections
    Data retrieved August 25, 2017

    View Slide

  19. Faculty teaching ATCM 2302 Design I have been working together to enable deeper, richer learning.

    View Slide

  20. Faculty teaching ATCM 2302 Design I have been working together to enable deeper, richer learning.
    Create parity of content in courses,
    regardless of section.
    ATCM 2302 – Assignment #3
    Illusion of Space
    Create the illusion of three-dimensional space using three different devices to
    show depth—size, overlapping, vertical location, one-point perspective, two-point
    perspective, multi-point perspective, and aerial perspective. For example: size,
    overlapping, and linear perspective could be applied in the same composition.
    Create your design as either open or closed form using naturalistic, abstract, or
    nonobjective shapes, with clearly identifiable foreground, middle ground, and
    background areas.
    Use pencil and/or black sharpie on a sheet of 8.5x11” white cardstock paper to
    compose your final design. If using aerial perspective, you will need to employee
    hatching and cross hatching and/or shading to create the range of values needed.
    IDEATE
    First sketch at least six mini-compositions on one page of your sketchbook to
    experiment with different ideas. Take a photo or scan this page.
    DESIGN PROCESS
    Document the following stages of the design process: define, ideate, prototype, and
    feedback. Use correct design terminology when describing your design and
    explaining the methods and devices used in composing your design. You will submit
    a typewritten document of these stages (in Word or PDF format) to eLearning.
    RUBRIC
    25% – Craftsmanship: Design is clear with no defects in workmanship and uses
    specified materials.
    15% – Design process: All phases of the design process are completed. Design
    terminology is correctly used.
    15% – Sketches: Six mini sketches (mini compositions) uploaded to eLearning.
    15% – Depth Demonstrates exemplary understanding of illusion of depth. Three or
    more devices employed. The foreground, middle ground, and background
    are logical and clear.
    15% – Open/closed form: Open or closed form encompasses the entire picture
    plane.
    15% – Effort and originality: Demonstrates an exemplary understanding of depth,
    in a highly original and unique design.
    Because space in two-
    dimensional pieces can
    only be implied, the
    designer translates cues
    from a 3D experience to a
    two-dimensional plane.
    Consider
    What are the most
    common devices used to
    create an illusion of
    space in photography,
    video, or animation?
    What role does value
    contrast play in creating
    an illusion of space?
    When using one- or two-
    point perspective, what
    determines whether you
    will see the rooftops on
    buildings?
    Connect
    You will explore space,
    perspective, and 3D
    further in
    Computer Imaging.
    ATCM 2302 – Assignment #3
    Illusion of Space
    Create the illusion of three-dimensional space using three different devices to
    show depth—size, overlapping, vertical location, one-point perspective, two-point
    perspective, multi-point perspective, and aerial perspective. For example: size,
    overlapping, and linear perspective could be applied in the same composition.
    Create your design as either open or closed form using naturalistic, abstract, or
    nonobjective shapes, with clearly identifiable foreground, middle ground, and
    background areas.
    Use pencil and/or black sharpie on a sheet of 8.5x11” white cardstock paper to
    compose your final design. If using aerial perspective, you will need to employee
    hatching and cross hatching and/or shading to create the range of values needed.
    IDEATE
    First sketch at least six mini-compositions on one page of your sketchbook to
    experiment with different ideas. Take a photo or scan this page.
    DESIGN PROCESS
    Document the following stages of the design process: define, ideate, prototype, and
    feedback. Use correct design terminology when describing your design and
    explaining the methods and devices used in composing your design. You will submit
    a typewritten document of these stages (in Word or PDF format) to eLearning.
    RUBRIC
    25% – Craftsmanship: Design is clear with no defects in workmanship and uses
    specified materials.
    15% – Design process: All phases of the design process are completed. Design
    terminology is correctly used.
    15% – Sketches: Six mini sketches (mini compositions) uploaded to eLearning.
    15% – Depth Demonstrates exemplary understanding of illusion of depth. Three or
    more devices employed. The foreground, middle ground, and background
    are logical and clear.
    15% – Open/closed form: Open or closed form encompasses the entire picture
    plane.
    15% – Effort and originality: Demonstrates an exemplary understanding of depth,
    in a highly original and unique design.
    Because space in two-
    dimensional pieces can
    only be implied, the
    designer translates cues
    from a 3D experience to a
    two-dimensional plane.
    Consider
    What are the most
    common devices used to
    create an illusion of
    space in photography,
    video, or animation?
    What role does value
    contrast play in creating
    an illusion of space?
    When using one- or two-
    point perspective, what
    determines whether you
    will see the rooftops on
    buildings?
    Connect
    You will explore space,
    perspective, and 3D
    further in
    Computer Imaging.
    ATCM 2302 – Assignment #3
    Illusion of Space
    Create the illusion of three-dimensional space using three different devices to
    show depth—size, overlapping, vertical location, one-point perspective, two-point
    perspective, multi-point perspective, and aerial perspective. For example: size,
    overlapping, and linear perspective could be applied in the same composition.
    Create your design as either open or closed form using naturalistic, abstract, or
    nonobjective shapes, with clearly identifiable foreground, middle ground, and
    background areas.
    Use pencil and/or black sharpie on a sheet of 8.5x11” white cardstock paper to
    compose your final design. If using aerial perspective, you will need to employee
    hatching and cross hatching and/or shading to create the range of values needed.
    IDEATE
    First sketch at least six mini-compositions on one page of your sketchbook to
    experiment with different ideas. Take a photo or scan this page.
    DESIGN PROCESS
    Document the following stages of the design process: define, ideate, prototype, and
    feedback. Use correct design terminology when describing your design and
    explaining the methods and devices used in composing your design. You will submit
    a typewritten document of these stages (in Word or PDF format) to eLearning.
    RUBRIC
    25% – Craftsmanship: Design is clear with no defects in workmanship and uses
    specified materials.
    15% – Design process: All phases of the design process are completed. Design
    terminology is correctly used.
    15% – Sketches: Six mini sketches (mini compositions) uploaded to eLearning.
    15% – Depth Demonstrates exemplary understanding of illusion of depth. Three or
    more devices employed. The foreground, middle ground, and background
    are logical and clear.
    15% – Open/closed form: Open or closed form encompasses the entire picture
    plane.
    15% – Effort and originality: Demonstrates an exemplary understanding of depth,
    in a highly original and unique design.
    Because space in two-
    dimensional pieces can
    only be implied, the
    designer translates cues
    from a 3D experience to a
    two-dimensional plane.
    Consider
    What are the most
    common devices used to
    create an illusion of
    space in photography,
    video, or animation?
    What role does value
    contrast play in creating
    an illusion of space?
    When using one- or two-
    point perspective, what
    determines whether you
    will see the rooftops on
    buildings?
    Connect
    You will explore space,
    perspective, and 3D
    further in
    Computer Imaging.
    ATCM 2302 – Assignment #3
    Illusion of Space
    Create the illusion of three-dimensional space using three different devices to
    show depth—size, overlapping, vertical location, one-point perspective, two-point
    perspective, multi-point perspective, and aerial perspective. For example: size,
    overlapping, and linear perspective could be applied in the same composition.
    Create your design as either open or closed form using naturalistic, abstract, or
    nonobjective shapes, with clearly identifiable foreground, middle ground, and
    background areas.
    Use pencil and/or black sharpie on a sheet of 8.5x11” white cardstock paper to
    compose your final design. If using aerial perspective, you will need to employee
    hatching and cross hatching and/or shading to create the range of values needed.
    IDEATE
    First sketch at least six mini-compositions on one page of your sketchbook to
    experiment with different ideas. Take a photo or scan this page.
    DESIGN PROCESS
    Document the following stages of the design process: define, ideate, prototype, and
    feedback. Use correct design terminology when describing your design and
    explaining the methods and devices used in composing your design. You will submit
    a typewritten document of these stages (in Word or PDF format) to eLearning.
    RUBRIC
    25% – Craftsmanship: Design is clear with no defects in workmanship and uses
    specified materials.
    15% – Design process: All phases of the design process are completed. Design
    terminology is correctly used.
    15% – Sketches: Six mini sketches (mini compositions) uploaded to eLearning.
    15% – Depth Demonstrates exemplary understanding of illusion of depth. Three or
    more devices employed. The foreground, middle ground, and background
    are logical and clear.
    15% – Open/closed form: Open or closed form encompasses the entire picture
    plane.
    15% – Effort and originality: Demonstrates an exemplary understanding of depth,
    in a highly original and unique design.
    Because space in two-
    dimensional pieces can
    only be implied, the
    designer translates cues
    from a 3D experience to a
    two-dimensional plane.
    Consider
    What are the most
    common devices used to
    create an illusion of
    space in photography,
    video, or animation?
    What role does value
    contrast play in creating
    an illusion of space?
    When using one- or two-
    point perspective, what
    determines whether you
    will see the rooftops on
    buildings?
    Connect
    You will explore space,
    perspective, and 3D
    further in
    Computer Imaging.

    View Slide

  21. Faculty teaching ATCM 2302 Design I have been working together to enable deeper, richer learning.
    Create parity of content in courses,
    regardless of section.
    See broadly and deeply at once.
    Line
    Balance Movement Pattern Contrast Rhythm Emphasis Unity
    Shape
    Space
    Form
    Color
    Value
    Texture

    View Slide

  22. Faculty teaching ATCM 2302 Design I have been working together to enable deeper, richer learning.
    Create parity of content in courses,
    regardless of section.
    See broadly and deeply at once.
    Make the course content visible,
    available, and understandable by all
    faculty
    The core ATEC foundation includes four courses.
    Three will include electronic learning portfolios beginning fall 2017.
    CS 1335
    Computer Science I
    for non-majors
    Ability to develop object-oriented software
    solutions
    Ability to express multi-class relationships
    among objects
    Ability to implement graphical user interfaces
    Ability to develop event driven programs
    Ability to implement algorithms to search and
    sort objects
    Ability to develop recursive programs
    These listed classes, combined with four
    additional pathway-foundation courses,
    comprise the eight lower-level course
    requirements for undergraduates.
    Pathway options include:
    These listed classes, combined with four
    additional pathway-foundation courses,
    comprise the eight lower-level course
    requirements for undergraduates.
    Pathway options include:
    Introduction to object-oriented software
    analysis, design, and development. Classes
    and objects. Object composition and
    polymorphism. Sorting and searching. Strings
    using core classes. Inheritance and interfaces.
    Graphical User Interfaces.
    ATCM 2301
    Computer Imaging
    Develop competency in artistic terminology,
    principles of art and design, and an
    appreciation of aesthetics.
    Gain a working knowledge of imaging
    software by developing the skills of photo
    manipulation, color correction, image
    management, compositing, and design.
    Analyze and interpret the principles of art and
    design through analysis, discussion, critique,
    and the assessment of digital works of art,
    including their own.
    Exhibit a body of work through the
    development and management of a learning
    portfolio.
    Introduction to digital image-making and
    manipulation using contemporary software
    applications. Graphic, photographic, and
    computational tools and methods are
    presented and applied to art and design
    problems. Computer images are prepared for
    multiple delivery environments, including the
    Internet, games, animation, and others.
    ATCM 2300
    Introduction to Technoculture
    Reconstruct the technocultural histories of
    significant objects and processes
    Describe how an object evokes meaning
    Analyze an object to elaborate how
    technology and culture are related
    Create an original analysis of a pair objects
    that illustrate the complex relationship of
    human beings, technology, and culture
    Identify key questions that could be explored
    in each of the five ATEC curriculum pathways
    In this foundational course students consider
    about the complex relationship between
    technology and culture. They will study
    evocative objects to raise questions about the
    history, impact, and implications of the
    co-evolution of technology and society.
    ATCM 2302
    Design I
    Demonstrate fluency of foundational
    concepts and terminology of the elements and
    principles of design, color theory and
    typography.
    Demonstrate awareness of foundational
    artists and designers by analyzing their work
    and design practice.
    Design compositions that successfully apply
    the use of design theory using tactile media.
    Identify and apply a design process providing
    rationales of design decisions in a learning
    portfolio.
    Provides foundational knowledge of visual
    structure and problem solving in two- and
    three-dimensional design. Students will be
    introduced to design methodology and design
    processes with emphasis on the formal
    principles of composition and organization.
    Animation
    Critical Media Studies
    Design and Production
    Game Studies
    Mediated Communication
    Paul Lester
    Clinical Professor
    Anne Balsamo
    Dean,
    Distinguished University Chair
    Daedra Christopher
    Senior Lecturer
    Asma Naz
    Senior Lecturer
    Sharon Hewitt
    Senior Lecturer
    Donna Aldridge
    Senior Lecturer
    Chip Wood
    Clinical Associate Professor
    Nick Benke, Joseph Porritt
    Teaching Assistants
    Sarah Larson
    Teaching Assistant
    Karen Doore
    Senior Lecturer
    The ATEC foundation curriculum includes four courses.
    Four additional make up pathway foundations.
    ATCM 2300
    Introduction to Technoculture
    ATCM 2301
    Computer Imaging
    CE 1335
    Computer Science I
    ATCM 2302
    Design I
    ATEC Foundation
    Together, these eight courses
    fulfill the lower-level major
    requirements in the ATEC
    degree plan.
    ATCM 1316
    Drawing Foundations
    ATCM 2303
    Project Management
    for ATEC I
    ATCM 2305
    Computer Animation Processes
    CS 2335
    Computer Science II
    for Non-majors
    Animation
    ATCM 2320
    Critical Media Research
    Foundations
    ATCM 2322
    Media History
    ATCM 2321
    Reading Media Critically
    ATCM 2335
    Internet Studio I
    Critical Media Studies
    ATCM 2304
    Exploration of ATEC
    or
    ATCM 2355 Survey of Digital Fabrication
    ATCM 2365 Game Design Fundamentals
    ATCM 2305 Computer Animation Processes
    ATCM 2303
    Project Management
    for ATEC I
    ATCM 2322
    Media History
    or
    ATCM 2322 Reading Media Critically
    ATCM 2335
    Internet Studio I
    Design and Production
    ATCM 1316
    Drawing Foundations
    ATCM 2303
    Project Management
    for ATEC I
    ATCM 2365
    Game Design Fundamentals
    CS 2335
    Computer Science II
    for Non-majors
    Game Studies
    ATCM 2380
    Communication and Social
    Science Theories
    PSY 2301
    Introduction to Psychology
    ATCM 2385
    Media and Communication
    Research Methods I
    PSY 2301
    Statistics for Psychology
    Mediated Communication
    Every ATEC student takes these four foundational courses.
    2 The student begins foundational work in one of the five ATEC pathways.
    3 At the end of sophomore year (around 45 credit hours) the student applies to enter a pathway.
    Upon admittance into a
    pathway, students begin their
    upper-level major
    requirements.
    1
    001
    001
    002 003 004
    30/30
    65/65
    52/60
    005 006 501 502
    Faculty
    001 Doore 002 Doore
    Faculty Hewitt Faculty Faculty Hewitt Hewitt Wood
    002 003 004 005 006 501 502
    Christopher
    001 Balsamo
    Christopher Christopher Naz Naz Lester Lester Naz 503 Naz
    A total of 540 students took ATEC foundation courses in fall 2017.
    Of those students: 6% enrolled in three courses, 41% enrolled in two, and 53% enrolled in just one.
    ATCM 2301
    Computer Imaging
    256 out of 270
    ATCM 2300
    Introduction to Technoculture
    297 out of 300
    ATCM 2302
    Design I
    240 out of 240
    CS 1335
    Computer Science I
    for non-majors
    117 out of 125
    A student’s degree includes core courses, courses for their major, and electives.
    An undergraduate degree is a total 40 courses.
    Core Curriculum
    14 classes
    1
    Lower Level
    Major
    Requirements
    8 classes
    2
    Upper Level
    Major
    Requirements
    8 classes
    Lower Level
    Major
    Requirements
    8 classes
    Upper Level
    Major
    Requirements
    8 classes
    2
    Prescribed
    Electives
    5 classes
    2
    Free Electives
    5 classes
    4o total classes
    5
    A sample ATEC undergraduate degree
    plan for students entering in 2016.
    The degree plan color coded and
    mapped to number of classes.
    Core Curriculum
    14 classes
    Lower Level Major Requirements
    8 classes
    Upper Level Major Requirements
    8 classes
    48 hours spent in class
    48-144 hours studying/preparing
    30 hours spent in class
    30-90 hours studying/preparing
    42 hours spent in class
    42-126 hours studying
    Prescribed Electives
    5 classes
    Free Electives
    5 classes
    Core
    Through the Texas Core Curriculum, students will gain a foundation of
    knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world, develop
    principles of personal and social responsibility for living in a diverse world, and
    advance intellectual and practical skills that are essential for all learning.
    Major
    Courses taken to satisfy requirements for
    the student's major field of study.
    Electives
    Courses exploring subjects not directly related
    to a student's major.
    ATEC Foundation Pathway Foundation
    Course
    UTD
    Sem.
    Transfer
    Inst.
    Grade/
    SCH
    Course
    UTD
    Sem.
    Transfer
    Inst.
    Grade/
    SCH
    Course
    UTD
    Sem.
    Transfer
    Inst.
    Grade/
    SCH
    COMM 1311
    RHET 1302
    ARTS 1316 Drawing Foundations
    ATEC 2320 or ATEC 2325
    or ATEC 2326 or ATEC 2385
    ATEC 2340 Project Management I
    ATEC 2382 Computer Imaging
    GOVT 2305 ATEC 2384 Design I
    ATEM 1100 (first-time in
    college students only)
    GOVT 2306 CS 1335 Comp. Sci. I for non-majors*
    Upper-Level Elective
    CS 2335 Comp. Sci. II for non-majors
    Upper-Level Elective
    Upper-Level Elective
    ARTS 3371 or ARTS 3372 or ARTS 3377
    or ARTS 3379 or ARTS 436 8 or ATEC 3330
    Upper-Level Elective
    ATEC 3320 or ATEC 3325
    *CS 1334 + CS 1134
    (Prereq. for CS 1335)
    ATEC 3310 or ATEC 3346 or ATEC 3351
    or ATEC 3317, 3327, 3328, or 3336
    Any 3000/4000-level AHST class
    or DRAM 3323 or FILM 3321 or MUSI 3322
    □ UNIV 1010
    ATEC 3384
    ATEC 4380 or ATEC 4381
    ATEC 3329 or CS 336 0 or CS 4352
    HIST 3328 or HIST 3337 or HIST 3374
    or LIT 3316 or LIT 3334
    B.A. Arts and Technology Degree Plan Name: ___________________________________________
    ID#: ____________________________
    Advisor: _______________________
    Minor: _________________________
    Admit Term: ___________________
    Audits
    45: ____
    75: ____
    UT Dallas • School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication
    2016 Catalog • 120 Semester Credit Hours (SCH) – includes 51 upper-level SCH
    While advisors confer with students about courses and
    educational experiences, students are responsible for
    defining the content of their academic program, being aware
    of all graduation requirements, and making progress toward
    an academic degree. Advisors will assist students in
    designing an appropriate course of study that will satisfy
    requirements for graduation as well as offer information on
    particular courses and University rules and procedures.
    H. Life & Physical Sciences (030): 6 SCH
    B. Language, Philosophy & Culture (040): 3 SCH
     M a j o r R e q u i r e m e n t s , L o w e r - L e v e l : 2 1 S C H
    C. Creative Arts (050): 3 SCH
     F r e e E l e c t i v e s : 1 8 S C H
    Both upper- and lower-level courses may be used as electives, but
    students must complete at least 51 hours of upper-level credit to qualify
    for graduation.
    D. Government/Political Science (070): 6 SCH
    E. American History (060): 6 SCH
    ΠC o r e C u r r i c u l u m R e q u i r e m e n t s : 4 2 S C H
    Ž M a j o r R e q u i r e m e n t s , U p p e r - L e v e l : 2 4 S C H
    F. Social & Behavioral Sciences (080): 3 SCH
    G. Mathematics (020): 3 SCH □ UNIV 2020
     P r e s c r i b e d E l e c t i v e s : 1 5 S C H
    Refer to the back of this degree plan for a list of prescribed
    elective options.
    A. Communication (010): 6 SCH I. Component Area Options (090): 6 SCH
    Learning Portfolios
    Planned Rollout
    ELPs will rollout in three courses in fall 2017 and a fourth
    in spring 2018.
    Questions a Learning Portfolio Might Ask
    Assessment is an integral component of the rollout.
    Overview
    The School of Arts, Technology and Emerging
    Communication is planning to implement Electronic
    Learning Portfolios (ELPs) in freshman-year experience
    courses beginning fall 2017.
    We envision that ELPs will be a unifying bridge for
    undergraduate work: it is an ongoing, cumulative
    repository for each student’s experience across courses
    and across years.
    In addition to final, polished student work, the portfolio will
    include reflection essays, thoughts on productive failures,
    documentation of skills and experiences, and
    interdisciplinary connections.
    In late spring 2016, a group of ATEC faculty began working
    to implement Electronic Learning Portfolios throughout
    ATEC students’ first-year experience via the eLearning
    (Blackboard) platform. The changes would be
    implemented beginning fall 2017.
    This important tool will allow the school to increase the
    rigor and quality of classes, while also producing students
    that include reflection and life-long learning in their
    practice.
    Learning portfolios are“a flexible tool that engages students
    in a process of continuous reflection and collaboration
    focused on selective evidence of learning ...
    The portfolio provides a critical opportunity for purposeful,
    mentored reflections and analysis of evidence for both
    improvement and assessment of students’ learning.”¹
    ¹ “The Learning Portfolio: A Powerful Idea for Signifcant Learning” by John Zubizarreta, Columbia College (IDEA Paper #4 4 , 20 0 8)
    What have I learned? Why did I learn?
    When have I learned? In what circumstances? Under
    what conditions?
    How have I learned or not, and do I know what kind
    of learner I am?
    How does what I have learned fit into a full, continual
    plan for learning?
    What difference has learning made in my
    intellectual, personal, and ethical development?
    Where, when, and how have I engaged in integrative
    learning? Has my learning been connected and
    coherent? Is my learning relevant, applicable,
    practical?
    When, how, and why has my learning surprised me?
    What have been the proudest highlights of my
    learning? The disappointments?
    In what ways has my learning been valuable?
    What difference has portfolio mentoring made in my
    learning?
    Fall 2017
    Intro to Technoculture
    Computer Imaging
    Design I
    Spring 2018
    Intro to Technoculture
    Computer Imaging
    Design I
    Design II
    Electronic Learning Portfolios will roll out in three courses beginning fall 2017.
    And a fourth course in spring 2018, Design II.
    ATCM 2301
    Computer Imaging
    ATCM 2300
    Introduction to Technoculture
    ATCM 2302
    Design I
    Intro
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
    Final Exams
    Winter Break
    Mid-term
    Project 1
    Crit 2
    Midterm Project Crit
    Midterm
    LP 1 LP 2 LP 3 LP 4 LP 5 LP 6 LP 7 LP 8
    Midterm Project
    Crit 1 In-class crit
    Project 2 Project 3 Project 4 Final Project
    Quiz 1 Quiz 2
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16
    Final Exams
    Winter Break
    Mid-term
    LP 1 LP 2 LP 3 LP 4 LP 5 LP 6 LP 7 LP 8 LP 9 LP 10 LP 11
    Project 1 Project 2
    Quiz 1 Quiz 2
    Final Exams
    Winter Break
    Mid-term
    Meets twice a week: Large lecture and breakout sections
    11 sections
    276 students
    Meets twice a week
    9 sections
    213 students
    Meets twice a week
    8 sections
    240 students
    Game Studies
    Mediated
    Communication
    Legend Learning Portfolio Lecture Project-based work Quiz or Exam Critique
    Animation
    Each week students learn about the pathways offering ATEC
    and add reflections on each pathway to their learning portfolio.
    Critical Media
    Studies
    Design and
    Production
    Final Project and Presentations
    Freshman
    Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior
    An undergraduate degree
    is 40 courses.
    Fall
    1 Spring
    2 Fall
    3 Spring
    4 Fall
    5 Spring
    6 Fall
    7 Spring
    8
    Sequencing of courses is important to ensure ATEC students can graduate on time.
    And are adequately prepared for the subsequent coursework.
    Pathway Application
    Students apply to a pathway in their
    first semester sophomore year
    Students are discouraged
    from taking all their core
    classes in their first few years.
    This ensures they have time to
    work on heavily project-based
    courses later in their college
    career
    Before entering into their pathway focus,
    students undergo a portfolio review to
    ensure a clear direction of work
    ATCM 2300
    Introduction to Technoculture
    ATCM 2301
    Computer Imaging
    CE 1335
    Computer Science I
    ATCM 2302
    Design I
    ATCM xxx
    Pathway Exploration 1 of 4
    1 of 14
    Core
    4 of 14
    Core
    2 of 14
    Core
    5 of 14
    Core
    3 of 14
    Core
    ATCM xxx
    Pathway Foundation 2 of 4
    ATCM xxx
    Pathway Foundation 4 of 4
    ATCM xxx
    Upper Level
    1 of 8
    ATCM xxx
    Pathway Foundation 3 of 4
    ATCM xxx
    Upper Level
    2 of 8
    6 of 14
    Core
    9 of 14
    Core
    7 of 14
    Core
    10 of 14
    Core
    8 of 14
    Core
    ATCM xxx
    Upper Level
    7 of 8
    ATCM xxx
    Capstone
    8 of 8
    3 of 5
    Prescribed Elective
    2 of 5
    Prescribed Elective
    4 of 5
    Prescribed Elective
    14 of 14
    Core
    5 of 5
    Prescribed Elective
    3 of 5
    Free Elective
    5 of 5
    Free Elective
    4 of 5
    Free Elective
    ATCM xxx
    Upper Level
    3 of 8
    ATCM xxx
    Upper Level
    5 of 8
    ATCM xxx
    Upper Level
    6 of 8
    ATCM xxx
    Upper Level
    4 of 8
    1 of 5
    Prescribed Elective
    11 of 14
    Core
    13 of 14
    Core
    12 of 14
    Core
    2 of 5
    Free Elective
    1 of 5
    Free Elective
    Foundation Pathway
    Pathway
    Pathway
    Pathway Entrance Pathway
    Pathway Focus

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  23. Faculty teaching ATCM 2302 Design I have been working together to enable deeper, richer learning.
    Create parity of content in courses,
    regardless of section.
    See broadly and deeply at once.
    Make the course content visible,
    available, and understandable by all
    faculty.
    Weave connections between courses.
    ATCM 2301
    Computer Imaging
    Introduction to digital image-making and
    manipulation using contemporary software
    applications. Graphic, photographic, and
    computational tools and methods are presented and
    applied to art and design problems. Computer images
    are prepared for multiple delivery environments,
    including the Internet, games, animation, and others.
    PREREQ —
    ATCM 2302
    Design I
    Provides foundational knowledge of visual structure
    and problem solving in two- and three-dimensional
    design. Students will be introduced to design
    methodology and design processes with emphasis
    on the formal principles of composition and
    organization.
    PREREQ —

    View Slide

  24. Donna Aldridge
    Lisa Bell
    Nicholas Benke
    Kristi Camacho
    Daedra Christopher
    Eric Farrar
    Sharon Hewitt
    Sarah Larson
    Paul Lester
    Dale MacDonald
    Roxanne Minnish
    Barbara Morgan
    Asma Naz
    Joseph Porritt
    Cassini Nazir
    Chip Wood
    Made possible by the ongoing work of these wonderful people.

    View Slide