Design for User Experience

1a56cac46379b3b1883dc78c169e0429?s=47 LibUX
May 20, 2015

Design for User Experience

Presented for the LYRASIS Annual Members' Meeting: eGathering 2015. March 5, 2015.

1a56cac46379b3b1883dc78c169e0429?s=128

LibUX

May 20, 2015
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Transcript

  1. Design for User Experience Amanda L. Goodman and Michael Schofield

  2. speakerdeck.com/libux

  3. speakerdeck.com/library user experience

  4. www.libux.co

  5. None
  6. www.libux.co

  7. #libux

  8. us·er ex·pe·ri·ence de·sign noun

  9. hu·man cen·tered de·sign noun

  10. hu·man cen·tered de·sign bleah

  11. us·er ex·pe·ri·ence de·sign the measure of your end-user’s interaction with

    your library: its brand, its product, and its services. noun
  12. us·er ex·pe·ri·ence de·sign the measure of your end-user’s interaction with

    your library: its brand, its product, and its services. • plottable • predictable noun
  13. None
  14. “Useful, usable, desirable: like three legs of a stool, if

    your library is missing the mark on any one of these it’s bound to wobble.”– Amanda Etches and Aaron Schmidt
  15. — Peter Morville

  16. useful a library service or application has utility and fulfills

    a need adjective
  17. usable a library service or application is easy to use

    adjective
  18. desirable a library service or application is one that people

    want, appreciate, and enjoy adjective
  19. findable a library service or application is easy to find

    and navigate adjective
  20. accessible a library service or application can be used by

    everyone adjective
  21. credible a library service or application inspires trust adjective

  22. “The honeycomb hits the sweet spot by … helping people

    understand the need to define priorities. Is it more important for your [service] to be desirable or accessible? How about usable or credible? The truth is, it depends on your unique balance of context, content, and users, and the required tradeoffs are better made explicitly than unconsciously.” — Peter Morville
  23. — Peter Morville

  24. None
  25. utility a library service or application fulfills a demonstrable need

    adjective
  26. usable 2. a library service or application is easy to

    use and intuitive. adjective
  27. useful useful = usable + utility “Usability and utility are

    equally important and together determine whether something is useful: it matters little that something is easy if it’s not what you want. It’s also no good if the system can hypothetically do what you want, but … is too difficult.” —Jakob Nielsen adjective
  28. What if your website disappeared? “We’re ever hopeful that if

    we advertise our websites in the right way, or create the right sort of graphic, or make the visual design more attractive, people will begin to use our content. This is pure fantasy.” —Aaron Schmidt
  29. None
  30. None
  31. http://uxmag.com/articles/leveraging-the-kano-model-for-optimal-results

  32. “Users don’t have to come to the library” —Courtney Greene

    McDonald
  33. A negative user experience impacts the numbers that matter to

    library stakeholders
  34. us·er ex·pe·ri·ence de·sign the use of tools, techniques, and the

    creative application of behavioral knowledge about users to improve the user experience - which correlates to the success of the library mission and goals. noun
  35. /vocabulary

  36. so …

  37. None
  38. Heuristic Evaluation

  39. None
  40. Now, an example of a totally professional expert review.

  41. Carousels 

  42. None
  43. Don’t think about bytes, think about seconds. • Context: 700kbs

    • 6.9 seconds (average) from desktop • 10.2 seconds (average) from phone • 65% increase in bounce for every 1 second of load time • 74% of users will abandon a website on mobile if it takes more than 4 seconds to load
  44. Don’t be a beach ball of death.

  45. — Erik Runyon

  46. — Nielsen Norman Group

  47. —Brad Frost

  48. None
  49. Signage

  50. Signage

  51. Directional e.g. bathroom, stairs/elevators wayfinders

  52. Identifying e.g. who donated the money for this room names

    spaces
  53. Informative e.g. upcoming holiday closing announce changes or give more

    information about an item
  54. Instructional e.g. how to use a machine do that this

    way
  55. Promotional e.g. draws attention to your alien romance collection Highlights

    a special area of interest
  56. /tangent

  57. Pay attention to how patrons use the library, and craft

    your services around their behavior.
  58. Heuristic Evaluation in Reverse —Bohyun Kim

  59. Heuristic Evaluation in Reverse • Find the problem/pain point •

    Think about a solution from a user’s perspective • Look for specific guidelines that apply • Look for specific best practices that apply • Otherwise, check the general heuristics and usability components. —Bohyun Kim
  60. “Field Studies”

  61. None
  62. None
  63. None
  64. As a _____________, I want to _______________________ so that __________________________.

    a young dad sign up for a library card check out books for my boy
  65. Touchpoints during Card Registration 1. Find out when the library

    is open on Saturday 2. Drive to the library and park 3. Make sure to pay enough for parking 4. Enter the library, approach the front desk, inquire 5. Fill out long paper form 6. Provide proof of residency and identification 7. Get Card
  66. Touchpoints during Card Registration 1. Find out when the library

    is open on Saturday 2. Drive to the library and park 3. Make sure to pay enough for parking 4. Enter the library, approach the front desk, inquire 5. Fill out long paper form 6. Provide proof of residency and identification 7. Get Card
  67. http://www.lib.umich.edu/files/services/usability/LibWebsite_PD.pdf

  68. None
  69. None
  70. None
  71. None
  72. None
  73. People tolerate even less cruft on a smaller screen.

  74. —Luke Wroblewski

  75. —Brad Frost

  76. Avoid content-delay syndrome. —Pepi Ronalds

  77. http://ibm.co/1KNo8fo

  78. Chunking + Governance

  79. None
  80. www.libux.co/core-content-audit

  81. Making life easier on you and your colleagues can improve

    content. “If subject specialists create guides and videos, librarians involved with programming (both academic and public) create events, and others maintain departmental info and policies—then, to ensure consistent and good content, it is unfair and counterproductive to present a system with too steep of a learning curve. I was naïve and surprised to see how strange and unfamiliar WordPress could be for those who don’t spend all day in it. “ LibraryLearn - ACRL 2015 IS Innovation Award Winner “How to COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere.” Computers in Libraries. December 2014.
  82. http://bit.ly/1KjYJsJ, CC BY 2.0

  83. Run the numbers.

  84. Web Google Analytics track every web platform

  85. Search e.g. website and catalog check those logs

  86. Email every service provides a report of some kind for

    your newsletters
  87. Library Stats ask why you’ve got a story to tell

  88. None
  89. Social Media don’t post just to post. track everything

  90. The user experience you craft through social media—the sense of

    responsiveness, customer service provided, perceived value—is increasingly important.
  91. Poor content—or not enough content—not only reflects poorly on your

    library, but for channels like Facebook that highlight popular or relevant content, posts that bomb negatively impact the overall visibility of your brand.
  92. None
  93. As of January 2014, 78% of libraries’ online audience is

    on social.
  94. “How can we, as librarians and library workers, incorporate professional

    values like information literacy and critical pedagogy with the principles of good user experience?” -- Amy
  95. It is easy to conflate the user’s “lack of skills”

    with our poor organizational and design choices. Often, a good user experience is closely tied to convention. We blame their inability to form proper research queries on their lack of information literacy, when in fact we are presenting a system that is wholly out of left field.
  96. #libweb

  97. Recognize bad user experiences.