Save 37% off PRO during our Black Friday Sale! »

Turfgrass growth potential and measuring clipping volume

C62291821dac0dd5b7ef3b72a30cd137?s=47 Micah Woods
December 13, 2018

Turfgrass growth potential and measuring clipping volume

These slides were used to introduce and explain the magic of a temperature-based turfgrass growth potential. One can get a starting point estimate of turfgrass nutrient use by what seems like magic, starting with high and low daily air temperatures and ending up with, for example, a daily or weekly or monthly expected magnesium use by the grass. I then went on to explain that one can measure what actually does happen by measuring the clipping volume of the grass as it is mown.

C62291821dac0dd5b7ef3b72a30cd137?s=128

Micah Woods

December 13, 2018
Tweet

Transcript

  1. Turfgrass growth potential and measuring clipping volume Micah Woods 13

    December 2018 Chief Scientist Asian Turfgrass Center www.asianturfgrass.com
  2. Temperature-based growth potential

  3. Grasses can grow well when temperatures are close to an

    optimum for growth, and grasses grow more slowly as the temperature moves away from the optimum.
  4. Temperature-based growth potential PACE Turf developed the Temperature-based GP to

    express the actual temperature in terms of its proximity to optimum temperatures for shoot growth. GP = e−0.5( t−to var )2 where, GP = growth potential, on a scale of 0 to 1 e = 2.71828, a mathematical constant t = average temperature for a location, in celsius to = optimum temperature, 20 for C3 grass, 31 for C4 grass var = adjusts the change in GP as temperature moves away from to ; I suggest 5.5 for C3 and 7 for C4
  5. None
  6. None
  7. None
  8. None
  9. None
  10. None
  11. None
  12. None
  13. None
  14. None
  15. None
  16. None
  17. Implications and use of GP • mowing frequency • fungicide

    duration • heat-related stress • topdressing requirement • nutrient use
  18. Measuring clipping volume

  19. None
  20. Use of clipping volume 1. Growth rate

  21. Use of clipping volume 1. Growth rate 2. Green speed

  22. Use of clipping volume 1. Growth rate 2. Green speed

    3. Nutrient use and supply
  23. Use of clipping volume 1. Growth rate 2. Green speed

    3. Nutrient use and supply 4. Consistency
  24. Use of clipping volume 1. Growth rate 2. Green speed

    3. Nutrient use and supply 4. Consistency 5. Topdressing
  25. 1. Growth rate

  26. Old Course, St. Andrews

  27. Kashima Soccer Stadium, Japan

  28. Royal Bangkok Sports Club

  29. Siam CC Plantation Course, Thailand

  30. 2. Green speed

  31. greenkeeper Andrew McDaniel (@drumcturf) at Keya GC, Japan

  32. Keya GC, Japan

  33. None
  34. None
  35. None
  36. None
  37. None
  38. None
  39. Keya GC, Japan

  40. Keya GC, Japan

  41. None
  42. None
  43. Eric Reasor project, photo at Koshigaya GC, Saitama, Japan

  44. None
  45. 3. Nutrient use and supply

  46. Nichino Ryokka research center at Chiba, Japan

  47. Chiba, Japan

  48. None
  49. For bentgrass, with every 10 mL/m2, expect a dry matter

    harvest of 0.6 g/m2.
  50. Then resupply as desired For example, 200 mL/m2 of bentgrass

    ≈ 0.5 g N/m2. And 0.25 g K/m2. And so on.
  51. None
  52. 4. Consistency

  53. Augusta National GC, USA

  54. Keya GC, Japan

  55. None
  56. None
  57. None
  58. None
  59. 5. Topdressing

  60. Tifeagle, Thailand

  61. “41% of members and players complain that sanded greens play

    poorly, according to turf managers who participated in recent GCI research.” GCI Magazine—April 2018
  62. Kanto region, Japan

  63. None
  64. None
  65. None
  66. None
  67. Table 1: Annual clipping volume at that location from 2013

    to 2016 Year Volume Estimated dry weight N applied L/m2 g/m2 g/m2 2013 4.4 266 NA 2014 3.4 201 13 2015 2.9 172 10 2016 2.4 142 8.5
  68. For more, please see www.asianturfgrass.com.