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Resumes and Interviews from the Hiring Manager's Perspective

Andy Lester
August 22, 2012

Resumes and Interviews from the Hiring Manager's Perspective

From the Career TOOLS Conference, 2012-08-22

Andy Lester

August 22, 2012
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  1. Resumes and
    Interviewing
    from the Hiring
    Manager’s
    Perspective
    Andy Lester
    Land The Tech Job You Love
    http://petdance.com/
    [email protected]

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  2. Two key takeaways

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  3. Your awesomeness
    is not self-evident!

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  4. You have to
    tell me
    about your
    awesomeness.

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  5. Follow principles,
    not rules.

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  6. What it’s like for me

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  7. I want to hire you.

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  8. Y! are a
    unique and

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  9. ... but this is my desk.

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  10. My three questions
    about you
    1. “Can she do the job?”
    2. “Do I want her working for me?”
    3. “Do I want her on the team?”

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  11. Resume questions
     Should I put skills first, or education?
     Does it have to be only one page?
     Should I list extra-curriculars?
     Should I leave off . . .
     Should I tell about my . . .

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  12. There is no
    Resume
    Police.

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  13. You do not have
    a resume.
    Tailor your resume to
    each job you apply to.

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  14. Key resume principles
     Reader attention is scarce commodity.
     Most important first. Least important last.
     Give facts, not self-assessments.
     Good stuff only! Leave off any fluff.
     Give detail. Tell stories. Use numbers.

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  15. One page?
    Two page?

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  16. “No good movie
    is too long
    and no bad movie
    is short enough.”
    Roger Ebert

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  17. Lose the clichés
     Professional
     Industrious; hard worker
     Good people person; team player
     Motivated; self-starter; makes things happen
     Strong communication skills

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  18. Show me,
    don’t tell me.

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  19. Use numbers!
     Numbers draw the eye.
     Numbers give a sense of size.
     Numbers are the language of business.
     Numbers express dollars and time.

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  20. Boring bullet points
     Provide desktop support by phone or in
    person as needed to minimize downtime
     Maintained hardware inventory and software
    licensing for office computers.

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  21. Interesting bullet points
     Provide desktop support by phone or in
    person. Averaged 8.2 calls/day with 92% of
    user problems solved in under 30 minutes.
     Maintained hardware inventory for 120 office
    computers and software licensing of 45
    different applications across the enterprise.

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  22. July 2010-present
    Night Operations Technician, Bug-Be-Gone Corp.
    * Maintained insect population by applying insecticides
    with truck-mounted sprayer.
    * Precisely tracked assigned paths through areas served.
    It came from my inbox

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  23. Principles, not rules!

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  24. Cover letters

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  25. Rule #1:
    Write one.

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  26. Rule #2:
    Write one for the
    specific position.

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  27. Your cover letter
    Your email is the cover letter.
    Highlights the extra-good stuff in the resume
    Shows that you care enough to send a
    personalized cover letter.
    Shows that you know about the company.

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  28. A good cover letter
    Dear Mr. Lester,
    My colleague Richard Dice referred me to the job recently
    posted on example.com. I believe that I can help Elsinore
    Publishing with my skills, including:
    4 years of computer programming experience.
    3 years working with Oracle databases.
    A BS in computer science from UIUC, with a 3.7 GPA.
    Experience in the book industry, and a natural love of books.
    I look forward for a chance to meet with you to discuss your
    needs and how I can help you and Elsinore.

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  29. I am much more than a programmer. In my long and varied work
    history, I have performed such jobs as knife salesman, manager of a
    hardware store, extracting retinas from bovine eyes as a
    neurological lab assistant, flower delivery driver and retirement
    home activities director, all of which make me a well-rounded
    candidate.
    It came from my inbox

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  30. I am much more than a programmer. In my long and
    varied work history, I have performed such jobs as knife
    salesman, manager of a hardware store,
    extracting retinas from bovine eyes
    as a cow eye sucker, cow eye sucker and cow eye sucker,
    all of which make me a well-rounded cow eye sucker.
    It came from my inbox

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  31. The interview

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  32. Hiring Manager’s Goals
     “Can she do the job?”
     “Do I want her working for me?”
     “Do I want her on the team?”
     Help convince candidate she should work for
    me and my company.

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  33. Candidate’s task
     “Can I do the job?”
     Convince the HM you can do the job.
     Get a job offer, or move closer to it.

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  34. After the offer
     “Do I want to work for this guy?”
     “Do I want to work on this team?”

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  35. Conversation,
    not interrogation.

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  36. Your interview
    is your first day
    on the job.

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  37. Some questions you’ll
    have to answer,
    and why I ask them

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  38. Tell me
    about yourself.

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  39. Tell me about yourself.
     Did she do any research?
     Is she prepared?
     How does she speak?
     Does she take pride in her work?
     What else should I ask about?

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  40. Where do you
    want to be
    in five years?

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  41. Where do you want to be in
    five years?
     Does he have any sort of plan?
     Does he work on self-improvement?
     Will I have a place for him?

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  42. Why do you
    want to work for us?
    What do you know
    about our company?

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  43. Why do you want to
    work for us?
     Has she done research?
     Is this just another job for her?
     What drives her?

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  44. Tell me about a
    project that
    didn’t go well.

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  45. Tell me about a project that
    didn’t go well.
     Is he a blamer/whiner?
     Can he learn from mistakes?
     How are his personal skills?
     Alternate: “Tell me someone you have
    trouble getting along with.”

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  46. Candidate questions

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  47. What’s a day like?

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  48. What sorts of projects
    will I be working on?

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  49. Is this a new position, or
    are you replacing?
    What happened?

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  50. Tell me about the team
    I’ll be joining.

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  51. Can I meet the team
    I’ll be joining?

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  52. Show you can
    do the job.

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  53. Always ask for the job.

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  54. Key takeaways
     Your awesomeness is not self-evident.
     Give evidence, not self-assessments.
     Use numbers to give detail.
     Think like the hiring manager. You both
    want the same thing.

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  55. [email protected]
    http://petdance.com
    @petdance on Twitter

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  56. Bonus slides

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  57. What’s your
    Google footprint?
     What will I see when I Google your name?
     Have you tried it yourself? Past the first
    page of hits? In the past six months?
     Set up a Google Alert to keep up on
    mentions of your name.
     http://google.com/alerts/

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  58. 15 ways to
    kill an interview
    1. Show up late
    2. Be unprepared
    3. Chew gum, smell like smoke, bring a drink
    4. Shake hands like a fish
    5. Have bad breath or body odor

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  59. 15 ways to
    kill an interview
    6. Come underdressed
    7. Speak ill of anyone, including especially
    past employers
    8. Complain or discuss your problems
    9. Bring up your needs: Money, benefits
    10. Lie

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  60. 15 ways to
    kill an interview
    11. Appear uninterested
    12. Appear overenthusiastic or desperate
    13. Fail to ask your own questions
    14. Leave your phone on
    15. Cut the interview short

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