Upgrade to Pro — share decks privately, control downloads, hide ads and more …

Ways to Listen, Ways to Act: Impactful UX Strategy

Ways to Listen, Ways to Act: Impactful UX Strategy

I spoke on how to ask the right questions and unpack assumptions at Future of Web Design London.

Steph Troeth

May 15, 2013
Tweet

More Decks by Steph Troeth

Other Decks in Design

Transcript

  1. Future of Web Design, London
    May 2013
    Stephanie Troeth
    Ways to Listen,
    Ways to Act:
    @sniffles
    #fowd
    Impactful UX
    Strategy

    View full-size slide

  2. I own more books than clothes.

    View full-size slide

  3. http://www.flickr.com/photos/orinrobertjohn/221900474/

    View full-size slide

  4. http://www.flickr.com/photos/orinrobertjohn/221900474/
    Humans > Rubik’s Cubes

    View full-size slide

  5. Revealing Story
    #1
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/59195512@N00/145289605/

    View full-size slide

  6. How is it that we do all
    the “right” things...
    ...but still end up with
    something mediocre?

    View full-size slide

  7. open-ended
    close-ended
    “listening labs”
    “contextual enquiry”
    interviews
    usability testing
    remote testing tools
    surveys
    focus groups
    card sorting
    heuristic evaluation
    A/B testing
    We have many ways to listen...

    View full-size slide

  8. hi-fidelity
    low-fidelity
    realistic
    prototypes
    sketches
    graphic
    mockups
    paper
    prototype
    detailed
    wireframes
    functional
    prototype
    hi-level
    wireframes
    dynamic
    static
    storyboard functional
    specifications
    content
    inventory
    flow diagrams
    We have a lot of design tools...

    View full-size slide

  9. We have lots of discussions
    on how to use them.

    View full-size slide

  10. So why are we failing?
    Leadership?
    Process!
    Management?
    Communication
    Those
    designers...
    Those
    developers...
    n00bs!
    They call us a
    “channel”!

    View full-size slide

  11. I think there is one part that
    we don’t usually do well:
    Setting ourselves up.

    View full-size slide

  12. Revealing Story
    #2
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/flyingsaab/8446287189/

    View full-size slide

  13. Example research finding:
    “We found that undergraduate students
    didn’t want to read our prospectus on
    mobile devices.”

    View full-size slide

  14. http://www.balldesignconsultancy.com/case-studies/adding-value-to-higher-education/

    View full-size slide

  15. http://www.lboro.ac.uk/designandprint/design/featured-work/prospectuses/

    View full-size slide

  16. Typical prospectus content
    ✤ Organisational philosophy / why choose us
    ✤ Information to help students integrate
    ✤ Employment prospects
    ✤ Alumni
    ✤ List of degrees
    ✤ Application+entry requirements
    ✤ Tours and open days
    ✤ Location(s)/Contact info
    ✤ ...

    View full-size slide

  17. Greater context data (UK)
    Internet use over a mobile phone:
    rate of growth fastest in 16-24 yo,
    increasing from 44% to 71% in 2011.*
    Smartphone ownership (as of Jan 2011)
    Male < 35 @ 48%
    Female < 35 @ 40%
    Source: http://www.newmediatrendwatch.com/markets-by-country/18-uk/154-mobile-devices
    patterns don’t match?

    View full-size slide

  18. Was it because the question applies to
    the prospectus in its current format?
    (usually paper or PDF)
    Was it because students don’t find the
    content relevant?
    What happens if the content is
    available in a more mobile-friendly
    format?
    What if we used videos to convey
    similar information instead of
    pages of text?

    View full-size slide

  19. wrong
    answer
    wrong
    question

    View full-size slide

  20. misleading
    answers
    badly
    formed
    question
    mediocre
    design
    solution
    irrelevant?
    inaccurate?

    View full-size slide

  21. “Spherical chickens in a vacuum”
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=majaPLfQMzk
    Big Bang Theory: The Cooper-Hofstadter Polarization (Season 1, Ep. 9)

    View full-size slide

  22. Could it be as simple
    as asking the right
    questions up front?

    View full-size slide

  23. The shape of your question.
    & nuance

    View full-size slide

  24. Public transport scenario
    (London)

    View full-size slide

  25. Transport for London (www.tfl.gov.uk)

    View full-size slide

  26. Transport for London (www.tfl.gov.uk)

    View full-size slide

  27. Transport for London (www.tfl.gov.uk)

    View full-size slide

  28. National Rail (www.nationalrail.co.uk)

    View full-size slide

  29. National Rail (www.nationalrail.co.uk)

    View full-size slide

  30. National Rail (www.nationalrail.co.uk)

    View full-size slide

  31. National Rail (www.nationalrail.co.uk)

    View full-size slide

  32. Transport for London (www.tfl.gov.uk)

    View full-size slide

  33. Are these “usability” issues
    or a greater experience
    issue?
    How wide a net do we cast
    when looking for a solution?

    View full-size slide

  34. umbrellatoday.com

    View full-size slide

  35. The problem we need to
    address should match up
    with our goals.

    View full-size slide

  36. Transport for London (www.tfl.gov.uk)

    View full-size slide

  37. Typical question:
    How can we improve our metrics in the journey
    planner app?
    naive

    View full-size slide

  38. Better:
    A business question for the TFL
    What can we do to get people to use public
    transport more often?

    View full-size slide

  39. Business question:
    What can we do to get people to use public
    transport more often?
    ✤ Why are people not using public transport
    as often as they can?
    ✤ Do they run into obstacles?
    ✤ Do they perceive it to be less convenient
    than driving?
    ✤ ...
    extrapolate

    View full-size slide

  40. The scientific method of enquiry:
    1) create your hypothesis based on educated guess
    2) express your hypothesis & assumptions clearly
    3) look to prove or disprove your hypothesis

    View full-size slide

  41. Business question:
    What can we do to get people to use public
    transport more often?
    High-level research question:
    Are people using public transport as often as
    they can?
    Hypothesis: people can use public
    transport more often than they do now.

    View full-size slide

  42. Business question:
    What can we do to get people to use public
    transport more often?
    High-level research question:
    What obstacles are people facing in trying to
    use public transport?
    Assumption: people use public
    transport less because they run
    into obstacles.
    Hypothesis: If we remove obstacles, they will use
    public transport more.

    View full-size slide

  43. A game of questions?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LS9WSec4RXQ
    Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead!

    View full-size slide

  44. Rules of the game:
    ✤ No statements
    ✤ No repetition
    ✤ No synonyms
    ✤ No rhetoric
    ✤ No non-sequiturs

    View full-size slide

  45. Hypothesis:
    If we remove obstacles, they will
    use public transport more.
    Can we test this?
    Can we measure it?

    View full-size slide

  46. High-level research question:
    What obstacles are people facing in trying to
    use public transport?
    Derived research question:
    How do people prefer to plan their journeys?
    Why?
    Assumption: planning a journey is
    an obstacle.
    Hypothesis: If people can plan journeys well,
    they will use public transport more.

    View full-size slide

  47. Hypothesis:
    If people can plan journeys well,
    they will use public transport more.
    Can we test this?
    Can we measure it?

    View full-size slide

  48. Research question:
    How do people prefer to plan their journeys?
    Why?
    Design question:
    How can we better help people plan their journey?
    The design question needs to be
    actionable
    Hat tip: Kelly Goto

    View full-size slide

  49. Which question should we be asking?

    View full-size slide

  50. How do we make a choice?

    View full-size slide

  51. The strategy as a starting point.

    View full-size slide

  52. “[Businesses] think they know what their product and
    service is, they think that it’s all about execution. ‘If I
    execute better than the next guy, I’m going to win.’
    But the problem is that execution
    without the direction of a strategy,
    without the choices of the strategy, is
    all over the place. You might win occasionally
    but you’re probably not going to win consistently,
    reliably or sustainably.”
    http://www.businessinsider.com/ag-lafley-roger-martin-playing-to-win-2013-2
    A.G. Lafley says:

    View full-size slide

  53. Three levels of loops
    UI feature product
    UX strategy
    research
    design

    View full-size slide

  54. Choose your research scope,
    define your design parameters.

    View full-size slide

  55. “To embrace experimentation you just need to
    stop talking about design in a Socratic way [...]
    and start formalising hypotheses and tests.”
    Leisa Reichelt says:
    http://www.disambiguity.com/experimentation-beats-expertise/

    View full-size slide

  56. “[...] The experimental mindset is an egalitarian
    approach to design. It allows that anyone can
    suggest a design solutions and, rather than argue
    endlessly about whether it is better or worse than
    other approaches, you design a test. Find out how
    to find out which design works best.”
    Leisa Reichelt says:
    http://www.disambiguity.com/experimentation-beats-expertise/

    View full-size slide

  57. Isn’t this supposed to be
    creative?
    Wait a sec.

    View full-size slide

  58. Typical (healthy) creative process
    divergence convergence
    Ideas

    View full-size slide

  59. Typical (healthy) creative process
    design ideas
    inspiration &
    research
    problem framing
    prototyping
    divergence convergence

    View full-size slide

  60. research design
    hypotheses findings implementation
    ideas
    (or prototype)

    View full-size slide

  61. Accept that “findings” are just
    what we know at this point in
    time given what we’ve decided to
    focus on.
    The conscious researcher:

    View full-size slide

  62. Accept that what we create is
    limited by our knowledge.
    The conscious designer:

    View full-size slide

  63. Research findings are
    possible universes.

    View full-size slide

  64. Designs are also
    possible universes.

    View full-size slide

  65. A research and prototype process
    can reveal important customer
    behaviour that can impact all
    areas of your business.

    View full-size slide

  66. Revealing Story
    #3
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/torley/3656437810/

    View full-size slide

  67. User Experience Strategy
    provides a way to handle the
    constant shift of the meeting point
    between research and design.
    research design
    hypotheses findings implementation
    ideas
    (or prototype)

    View full-size slide

  68. Your research nurtures a
    creative model.

    View full-size slide

  69. Your design proves
    something.
    (or disproves)

    View full-size slide

  70. Your creative process is an
    continual experiment.

    View full-size slide

  71. Thank you!
    Many thanks to:
    Olivier Thereaux & David Rollert
    Stephanie Troeth
    @sniffles
    http://stephanietroeth.com/

    View full-size slide