Upgrade to Pro — share decks privately, control downloads, hide ads and more …

An introduction to simple and complex traits in humans, and how to study them in mice.

An introduction to simple and complex traits in humans, and how to study them in mice.

This slide deck describes the difference between simple and complex genetic traits in humans, how complex traits are studied in humans, and especially how we study them in laboratory mice.

8e4bf6269bc939dfd942996af10e070a?s=128

Steve Munger

March 24, 2022
Tweet

More Decks by Steve Munger

Other Decks in Science

Transcript

  1. An Introduction to Simple and Complex Traits in Humans, and

    How to Study Them in Mice. Steve Munger The Jackson Laboratory
  2. Questions to Answer • What are the differences between simple

    and complex traits? • How do we study the genetic basis of complex traits in humans? • Why and how do we study complex traits in mice? • What is “21st Century Mouse Genetics”?
  3. What is a trait? Trait - n. a distinguishing feature

    of your personal nature. In science, trait refers to a characteristic that is caused by genetics. A disease can be considered a trait. Traits can be classified by their inheritance pattern. Simple trait – Arises from mutations in a single gene. = “Mendelian” trait = “Binary” trait Complex trait – Affected by many genes. = “Quantitative” trait = “Multifactorial” trait
  4. Simple or ”Mendelian” traits arise from mutations in a single

    gene.
  5. Red hair is an example of a simple trait.

  6. Red hair is caused (primarily) by mutations in a single

    gene. 23andMe.com
  7. Red hair is an example of a recessive trait. 23andMe.com

    My redhaired daughter ?
  8. For a simple trait, you either have it or you

    don’t -- aka Binary phenotype. “Widow’s Peak”
  9. Your genome has about 3 billion bases of DNA. Changing

    only one of those bases can cause severe disease.
  10. 1 base change in the DNA → 1 amino acid

    change in the protein Glutamic Acid ⇢ Valine
  11. 1 amino acid change → clumped hemoglobin → Red blood

    cells with a “sickled” phenotype
  12. “Sickled” cells clump and block blood vessels… Sickle Cell Normal

    Red Blood Cell … and cause Sickle Cell Anemia
  13. But traits aren’t always simple. Most traits are complex.

  14. Proportion Most human traits are not binary and simple, but

    rather continuous and complex. These quantitative traits derive from the interplay of many genes (“polygenic”) and the environment.
  15. Height is a good example of a complex, quantitative trait.

  16. Your height is determined by a complex interplay of your

    genetics and your environment. Genome + Environment Let’s dig into genetic networks a little more
  17. No gene is an island.

  18. All genes act within networks, and all genetic networks are

    complex -- even for a simple trait. Muller-Linow et al 2008
  19. Muller-Linow et al 2008 The effects of a single gene

    mutation can disrupt the network enough to cause disease. Disease
  20. Muller-Linow et al 2008 In other people, that mutation may

    be buffered by variation in other genes. Healthy
  21. Wait a second, if it is that complex for a

    simple trait, what does it look like for a complex trait?!?
  22. Muller-Linow et al 2008 Complex traits are even more complex…

    Person 1 Healthy
  23. Muller-Linow et al 2008 Person 2 Healthy

  24. Muller-Linow et al 2008 Person 3 Mild Disease

  25. Muller-Linow et al 2008 Person 4 Severe Disease

  26. = Critical gene for that cell type Oh, and by

    the way, not every gene variant acts in the same cell type…
  27. Oh, and by the way, not every gene variant acts

    in the same cell type… or at the same time.
  28. And the environment affects everything. Maternal Diet Air/Water Quality Stress

    Nutrition Pregnancy Length Drug Use
  29. But how do we study a trait or disease that

    is so complex? HEIGHT
  30. Probability How do we even figure out which genes are

    causing variation in a complex trait?
  31. Example: Height is a quantitative trait Height (Inches) • •

    • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ••• • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 55 60 65 70 75 80 Observed Theoretical Normal
  32. Height (Inches) • • • • • • • •

    • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ••• • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 55 60 65 70 75 80 Observed Theoretical Normal • • • 55 60 65 70 75 80 Height is a complex trait
  33. Height (Inches) • • • • • • • •

    • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ••• • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 55 60 65 70 75 80 Observed Theoretical Normal • • • 55 60 65 70 75 80 Height (Inches) • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 55 60 65 70 75 80 Male Female
  34. Your height is largely determined by your genes. Height (Inches)

    • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • •• • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 XY XX • • • • • • 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 Sex Effect
  35. Most traits have a genetic component. “Heritability” Sex Effect

  36. Finding SNPs associated with height Height (Inches) • • •

    • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 55 60 65 70 75 80 CC CT TT • • • • 55 60 65 70 75 80
  37. Height (Inches) • • • • • • • •

    • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 55 60 65 70 75 80 AA AG GG • • • • • • 55 60 65 70 75 80 Finding SNPs associated with height
  38. We can test every SNP for its association with height.

    Significance “Manhattan Plot”
  39. But what does that tell us? The Arby’s example.

  40. But what does that tell us? The Arby’s example. I

    originally made this example for students at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine. The scenario is this: You are really craving an Arby’s Beef ‘n Cheddar sandwich, but you don’t know where the Arby’s is located in Lewiston-Auburn, and you don’t have a car. How could you figure out where the Arby’s is located using the Citylink bus routes (and without seeing the actual Arby’s restaurant)?
  41. At each bus stop, count the number of Arby’s wrappers

    in the trash.
  42. Could you predict which bus stop is closest to Arby’s?

    23 1 2 0 1 17 13 5 6 2 2 1 3 1 0 2 9 2 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
  43. Height (Inches) • • • • • • • •

    • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 55 60 65 70 75 80 AA AG GG • • • • • • 55 60 65 70 75 80 There’s an Arby’s (gene regulating height) near this bus stop (SNP marker).
  44. Finding “Arby’s” in the genome Significance

  45. Our ability to detect an association depends on the variant’s

    frequency in the population. Height (Inches) • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 55 60 65 70 75 80 AA AG GG
  46. Rare variants are problematic Solution: Increase your sample size Height

    (Inches) • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • •• • • • • • • ••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • •• • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 55 60 65 70 75 80 AA AG GG
  47. UK Biobank data Current Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) results for

    height
  48. Some traits turn out to be pretty simple.

  49. If you can measure it, you can run a GWAS

    on it. But buyer beware (of confounding variables). None of these genes/variants are known to be associated with food or alcohol intake. But in the UK Biobank, this trait is positively correlated with "Average total household income before tax" and inversely correlated with "Job involves heavy manual or physical work”.
  50. Let’s dig into an example of a complex disease: Type

    2 Diabetes (T2D)
  51. In Type 2 Diabetes, the body stops using and making

    insulin properly. https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/type-2-diabetes
  52. Type 2 Diabetes is a complex disease caused by genetic

    and environmental factors. GWAS has identified hundreds of genetic variants associated with T2D. The vast majority are found in non-coding regions of the genome.
  53. None
  54. So we can use GWAS to identify genetic variants associated

    with T2D. Maternal Diet Air/Water Quality Stress Nutrition Pregnancy Length Drug Use But how do we go from genes → mechanisms → therapeutics?
  55. Humans are terrible genetic models Novembre et al 2008 •

    Population stratification can cause false positives in association studies. • They take too long to breed, and live way too long. • Environmental variance can mask genetic influence. • Many adult traits originate during development.
  56. Emerging themes Most traits and diseases are complex and polygenic.

    No gene is an island - The function of any gene depends on the genetic background it is a part of. - The effects of a mutation in one gene may be amplified or buffered (ie, modified) by variation in another gene (modifier). - A disease-causing mutation may lead to severe pathology in some people but mild or no pathology in others. We can identify these modifier variants in humans using Genome-Wide Association Studies. We’re limited to what we can study (and more specifically, how we can study it) in humans themselves.
  57. Bring on the mouse! (Full Disclosure: I love mouse genetics)

    (Yes, this is my license plate) (Not to scale)
  58. Mice are exceptional animal models • Physiologically and anatomically similar

    to humans. • Breed early and often. Access to tissues at all stages of development and adulthood. • Can be inbred and genetically modified. • Highly characterized (genome sequence, curated databases) • Can be used to map modifiers and build networks. • No, they are not little humans, but…
  59. No, mice are not humans, but the mouse and human

    genomes are very similar. Griffiths et al. 2002
  60. Let’s dig into mouse genetics - Laboratory mice are derived

    from three major sub-species
  61. Classical inbred laboratory strains are genetically closely related.

  62. What is an inbred strain? • Genetically identical • Animals

    that result from the process of brother-sister mating for at least 20 sequential generations
  63. Consequences of Inbreeding Up to 20 Generations Silver 1995 100%

    90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0% 0 5 10 15 20 Generations of inbreeding Individual homozygosity at current generation Portion of genome that is fixed between two breeding sibs chosen for producing next generation 98.6%
  64. Sanger: Resequencing 36 inbred strains (http://www.sanger.ac.uk/resources/mouse/genomes/)

  65. Inbred mice are useful models of disease

  66. For example, there are many inbred strains that model one

    or more aspects of diabetes
  67. Mouse Phenome Database http://www.jax.org/phenome A wealth of historic data exists

    for inbred strains.
  68. Mouse Genetic Crosses/Strains Visual Summary Crosses Backcross (N2) Intercross (F2)

    Strains Consomic Congenic Advanced Intercross Recombinant Inbred (RI) Recombinant Congenic (RC) Recombinant Inbred Intercross (RIX) Image courtesy of Wayne Frankel, JAX Slide stolen from Greg Cox
  69. Intercross P1 X P2 F1 X F1 F2 ~25 recombinations

    per F2 animal
  70. Backcross P1 X P2 P1 X F1 BC1 ~15 recombination

    events per mouse
  71. QTL Mapping Genome Scan Lander and Botstein, Genetics 1989 Few

    hundred F2 or BC progeny 100-200 markers genotyped
  72. A QTL interval may contain hundreds of genes – Difficult

    to find the causal gene.
  73. Two-parent QTL Crosses • Easy to map significant QTLs. Straightforward

    analysis. • Fewer mice required. – Even recessive alleles will be homozygous in ¼ of progeny. • All mice need to be genotyped ($). • Number of recombination events per mouse is low. Less recombination = lower mapping resolution = more mice ($). • Confidence intervals tend to be broad and resolving the causative gene may require heroic follow-up experiments.
  74. Variations on a theme: Recombinant Inbred Lines (RILs) Rob Williams

    Ashbrook et al. 2019 BXD Lines Genenetwork.org Each BXD line is inbred, replicable, and fully genotyped, and is associated with a lot of historic data
  75. Expand to analyze many lab strains and RILs – Hybrid

    Mouse Diversity Panel Jake Lusis
  76. Common laboratory strains are only showing us part of the

    genetic story. Yang et al., 2011 Nature Genetics
  77. But is the mouse really a good model of human

    biology and disease?
  78. Is an inbred mouse a good model for the genetically

    diverse human population?
  79. None
  80. Why didn’t I see this adverse effect in my mouse

    model?
  81. Transitioning from a reductionist approach to one that integrates and

    embraces genetic diversity: “21st Century Mouse Genetics”
  82. Genetically diverse mouse models may improve translational relevance

  83. Multi-parent crosses Use 8 inbred founder lines Select founder lines

    to increase genetic diversity CAST 129S1 WSB NZO A/J B6 NOD PWK
  84. Founder strain genomes are fully sequenced and annotated Mouse Genomes

    Project, Keane et al. 2011 https://www.sanger.ac.uk/sanger/Mouse_SnpViewer/rel-1505
  85. Diversity Outbred and Collaborative Cross mice Powerful orthogonal resources for

    gene discovery and validation • Balanced population structure • 400+ recombinations per animal • High heterozygosity • Each animal is unique 5 common lab + 3 wild-derived strains 52 million+ SNVs, 2 million+ indels • Reproducible genomes • High genetic diversity • Fewer recombinations per line
  86. The Collaborative Cross (CC) are replicable, diverse inbred strains for

    disease research and genetic mapping. *CC strains can also be used to validate observations/predictions from the DO.
  87. CC strains have emerged as powerful tools for infectious disease

    research
  88. Recombinant inbred intercrosses (CC-RIX) Availability of replicable hybrid genomes enables

    more precise measurement of traits. Higher measurement precision improves genetic mapping.
  89. Diversity Outbred (DO) mice are each genetically unique, highly heterozygous,

    and optimized for genetic mapping.
  90. Balanced allele frequencies in the DO Svenson et.al. Genetics, 2011

    A/J C57BL/6J 129S1/SvImJ NOD/ShiLtJ NZO/LtJ CAST/EiJ PWK/PhJ WSB/EiJ *Nearly every gene in the genome has genetic variants segregating in the DO that are potentially functional
  91. 50 40 30 20 10 Body weight (gm) 7/11/2014 7/31/2014

    8/20/2014 date 50 40 30 20 10 Body weight (gm) 7/11/2014 7/31/2014 8/20/2014 date female DO mice male DO mice DO mice are genetically and phenotypically diverse Alan Attie & Mark Keller Female DO mice Male DO mice
  92. Diversity Outbred mice exhibit phenotypes far exceeding the range observed

    in the founder inbred strains.
  93. Some combinations of genetic variants produce very long-lived mice. This

    Diversity Outbred female lived to be 4 years 8 months old.
  94. None of the founder inbred strains live past 2.5 years.

    How is it possible that mixing their genomes up can result in a mouse that lives almost twice as long?
  95. DO Genomes: 28 possible heterozygous and 8 homozygous genotype states

    at every locus. A/J A BL6 B 129 C NOD D NZO E CAST F PWK G WSB H 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 A A A A A A A A B B B B B B B C C C C C C D D D D D E E E E F F F G G H A B C D E F G H B C D E F G H C D E F G H D E F G H E F G H F G H G H H Founder strains – 8 possible genotypes Diversity Outbred – 36 Possible Genotype states
  96. Genetic Mapping in DO Mice Genotyping Arrays Hidden Markov Model

    Genome Reconstruction i i k k ik c j j ij i g x y e g b a + + + = å å = = 8 1 1 Linkage and Association:
  97. Example of the power of the DO: Benzene Genotoxicity

  98. Benzene Inhalation Study 0 ppm Day 0 7 14 21

    28 1 ppm 10 ppm 100 ppm 6 hrs per day 5 days per week 1 2 Total 75 75 150 75 75 150 75 75 150 75 75 150 300 300 600 French, et al., Environmental Health Perspectives, 2015
  99. Benzene Study Endpoints Pre- and post-exposure blood Post-exposure bone marrow

    Proportion of micronucleated reticulocytes (MN-RET) o Measure of chromosomal damage French, et al., Environmental Health Perspectives, 2015
  100. Bone Marrow MN-RET DNA Damage French et.al., EHP, 2015

  101. QTL Plot of Bone Marrow MN-RET

  102. The CAST allele on Chr 10 is protective against genome

    damage. Chr 10 DNA Damage French et.al., EHP, 2015
  103. The CAST allele is dominant Prop. MN-RET Genotype French et.al.,

    EHP, 2015 Dan Gatti
  104. We can impute all known SNPs onto each DO genome

    and perform association mapping
  105. Sult3a1 and Gm4794 are sulfotransferases

  106. Sult3a1 and Gm4794 have high expression in CAST livers

  107. Sult3a1 has a strong cis-eQTL in DO livers CAST allele

    is highly expressed
  108. CAST/EiJ has a copy number gain of sulfotransferases http://www.sanger.ac.uk/sanger/Mouse_SnpViewer/rel-1303 http://ensembl.org

    Gm4794 Sult3a1
  109. Regulatory variants (eQTL) are abundant in the DO (but you

    have to be very careful in your RNA-seq analysis…) CC/DO Founder Strain samples
  110. The founder origin of each allele is tagged and provides

    direct estimates of allelic abundance. The local eQTL for the lincRNA Gm12976 is cis-acting. DO samples N=277 N=554 allele-specific estimates.
  111. Differential allelic expression is the rule rather than the exception.

  112. Unique power + unique challenges Multi-parent, multi-generation crosses like the

    DO offer high genetic diversity (45M SNPs) and fine recombination block structure. Increased complexity requires specialized methods for haplotype reconstruction and mapping. QTL confidence intervals can be very small, but require more samples for mapping. Founder sequences can help to identify causal variants. Word of caution: If your phenotype is affected by many variants with small effects segregating in the DO, you will need ++++ mice to map them.
  113. Summary • Most common diseases are polygenic and stem from

    complex interactions between one’s genetic background and their environment. • No gene is an island. Genes interact within networks and pathways. • We can apply genetic mapping in human cohorts to identify risk variants associated with complex traits/diseases. • We can leverage the power of the mouse model and emerging diversity resources to refine and expand our understanding of complex human diseases.
  114. Questions to Answer • What are the differences between simple

    and complex traits? • How do we study the genetic basis of complex traits in humans? • Why and how do we study complex traits in mice? • What is “21st Century Mouse Genetics”?
  115. Thank you! Alex Stanton Questions? Email steven.munger@jax.org