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America's page 1, part 1

America's page 1, part 1

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  1. Today
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  2. Now
    9 Welcome and introduction
    9:15 The American reader and the newspaper
    9:45 History and anatomy of page one
    10:20 BREAK
    10:30 Language of design
    11 Modular design and designing modules
    Noon LUNCH
    12:45 America’s page one – PART ONE
    1:45 America’s page one – PART TWO
    2:45 BREAK
    3 Putting it all together
    3:55 Wrapping it all up
    4 Conclusion

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  3. America’s Page One
    n Number of non-daily newspapers 6,000+
    n Number of daily newspapers 1,200+

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  4. America’s Page One
    ABCDE
    Prices may vary in areas outside metropolitan Washington. SU V1 V2 V3 V4
    Democracy Dies in Darkness THURSDAY, MAY 2, 2019 . $2
    Warm, t­storm 87/68 • Tomorrow: T­storm 85/67 B8
    Landmark decision Olympic track champion
    Caster Semenya must take testosterone
    suppressors, a court ruled. D1
    Deadly trend The number of youths who
    have attempted suicide by poison is up. A2
    LOCAL LIVING
    What a NEAT idea
    Short for non-exercise
    activity thermogenesis,
    it’s a way to be fit just
    with everyday activity.
    STYLE
    ‘Baby on board’
    The enduring power of a
    1980s bumper sticker. C1
    In the news
    THE NATION
    Authorities said one of
    the victims of the shoot­
    ing at the University of
    North Carolina at Char­
    lotte knocked the at­
    tacker off his feet, saving
    others’ lives even as he
    was fatally wounded. A3
    The Navy has drafted a
    procedure to investigate
    reports of UFOs, but it
    doesn’t expect to make
    them public because of
    classified data. A14
    The Trump administra­
    tion may seek the re­
    newal of a surveillance
    law that allows the gath­
    ering of Americans’
    phone records as part of
    terrorism probes. A15
    Congress’s budget ana­
    lysts said moving to a
    health­care model like
    Medicare­for­all would
    be “challenging and po­
    tentially disruptive.” A18
    THE WORLD
    Military culture in
    Kenya punishes soldiers
    traumatized by the
    U.S.­backed war in So­
    malia instead of treating
    them, according to in­
    terviews. A8
    Taliban and U.S. offi­
    cials resumed peace
    talks, but a watchdog re­
    port warned that a deal
    could ultimately threat­
    en security and human
    rights. A11
    THE ECONOMY
    The family of a man
    killed in a fiery crash has
    sued Tesla, blaming its
    Autopilot system. A12
    The Federal Reserve
    left interest rates un­
    changed, defying a
    presidential push for
    lowering them. A13
    Three companies
    withdrew from a dinner
    that will honor Brazil’s
    far­right president. A13
    A Texas bill would ban
    people from using food
    stamps to buy junk food
    and sugary drinks. A14
    THE REGION
    The District’s annual
    effort to tamp down vio­
    lent crime in the sum­
    mer got underway. B1
    The number of home­
    less people on the
    streets and in shelters in
    the District is down for
    the third straight year,
    city officials said. B1
    As Atlanta’s archbish­
    op prepares to take the
    helm in Washington,
    prosecutors have begun
    investigating sexual
    abuse in the archdiocese
    he has led. B1
    A Georgetown profes­
    sor says his grandson
    was called the n­word
    and threatened by a
    classmate at his Wash­
    ington school. B3
    Virginia’s governor
    vetoed bills that would
    have imposed manda­
    tory minimum sen­
    tences on repeat domes­
    tic abusers and killers of
    police dogs. B5
    Inside
    TOBY MELVILLE/REUTERS BUSINESS NEWS........................A12
    COMICS........................................C6
    OPINION PAGES..........................A19
    LOTTERIES...................................B3
    OBITUARIES.................................B6
    TELEVISION..................................C4
    WORLD NEWS..............................A8
    DAILY CODE, DETAILS, B2
    2 7 7 6
    CONTENT © 2019
    The Washington Post / Year 142, No. 148
    1
    BY KAREN DEYOUNG,
    JOSH DAWSEY
    AND PAUL SONNE
    For weeks, the Venezuelan op-
    position had been working on a
    comprehensive blueprint to final-
    ly force President Nicolás Maduro
    from office. Several of his top mili-
    tary and civilian aides were said to
    have been persuaded to switch
    sides, while others would be al-
    lowed to leave the country. There
    was a strong suggestion that Ma-
    duro himself might peacefully fly
    to Havana.
    “They produced a pretty full
    plan,” a U.S. official said of the
    opposition. Implementation was
    tentatively set for Wednesday, al-
    though no date had been finalized.
    On Monday, however, the plan
    started to fall apart.
    Maduro, it seemed, had gotten
    wind of it, and opposition leader
    Juan Guaidó responded by rush-
    ing ahead. At dawn Tuesday, after
    alerting the U.S. State Depart-
    ment, Guaidó released a video say-
    ing that significant Venezuela mil-
    itary units were with him and that
    the moment had come to rise up
    against Maduro.
    But after a day of bloody pro-
    tests, the government remained
    intact. The Trump administration
    publicly blamed Russia and Cuba
    — Maduro’s top backers — for
    keeping him in place and discour-
    aging expected high-level defec-
    tions.
    On Wednesday, as the United
    States and Russia traded barbs,
    the White House held an emergen-
    cy meeting of top national security
    aides to mull next steps. “Signifi-
    cant progress on defense matters”
    was made, a senior administra-
    tion official said.
    SEE VENEZUELA ON A10
    ‘Full plan’
    to oust
    Maduro
    crumbles
    BY DEVLIN BARRETT,
    MATT ZAPOTOSKY,
    KAROUN DEMIRJIAN AND
    ROSALIND S. HELDERMAN
    Attorney General William P.
    Barr denied Democrats’ accusa-
    tions that he dissembled and mis-
    led the public about Robert S.
    Mueller III’s findings, defending
    his handling of the case during a
    contentious Senate hearing
    Wednesday about the special
    counsel investigation of Presi-
    dent Trump.
    Much of the hearing centered
    on revelations that Mueller com-
    plained more than a month ago
    about Barr’s initial public depic-
    tion of the investigation’s find-
    ings. The attorney general par-
    ried many of the Democrats’
    toughest accusations and ques-
    tions with avuncular answers
    about legal definitions and Jus-
    tice Department policy, exasper-
    ating lawmakers like Sen. Shel-
    don Whitehouse (D-R.I.), who ac-
    cused Barr of “masterful hair-
    splitting.”
    Mueller wrote a letter in late
    March expressing dissatisfaction
    to Barr that the attorney general’s
    four-page memo to Congress,
    which described the principal
    conclusions of Mueller’s investi-
    gation into the president’s con-
    duct and Russia’s election inter-
    ference, “did not fully capture the
    context, nature, and substance” of
    the special counsel’s work.
    Barr has said his memo wasn’t
    meant to summarize Mueller’s
    full report and at Wednesday’s
    hearing called Mueller’s letter “a
    bit snitty.”
    After the hearing ended, Jus-
    tice Department officials notified
    the House Judiciary Committee
    that Barr would not appear at a
    planned Thursday hearing to dis-
    cuss the Trump investigation.
    That session had been in doubt
    over objections by Barr’s aides
    that he would be questioned by
    staff lawyers for the committee.
    SEE BARR ON A17
    Barr denies accusations of deception
    BY GREG MILLER
    The contentious hearing
    Wednesday before the Senate
    Judiciary Committee was on the
    findings of special counsel
    Robert S. Mueller III, but his
    voice was absent — as it has
    been for the last two years.
    Attorney General William P.
    Barr became the latest Trump
    ally to take advantage of that
    void, and of Mueller’s
    constrained conception of his
    role, by speaking to his
    description of the work of the
    special counsel and his
    interpretation of the Mueller
    report’s conclusions — all to the
    advantage of the president. Barr
    pursued that role so aggressively
    Wednesday that at times he
    came across as much a defense
    lawyer for the president as
    attorney general of the United
    States.
    In particular, the attorney
    general downplayed or
    dismissed the evidence
    assembled by Mueller that
    Trump could be guilty of
    obstructing justice. And he
    emphasized that Mueller found
    SEE MUELLER ON A16
    ANALYSIS
    With Mueller silent, Barr speaks for
    him — and defends the president
    BY ERIN COX,
    OVETTA WIGGINS
    AND RACHEL CHASON
    Maryland lawmakers elected a
    black woman Wednesday as
    speaker of the House of Delegates,
    choosing Del. Adrienne Jones as a
    consensus candidate to end a bit-
    ter fight over a powerful leader-
    ship position that for more than
    four centuries had been held by
    white men.
    Jones, 64, emerged as the sur-
    prise winner after a nearly five-
    hour closed-door meeting where
    Democrats who control the House
    were deadlocked between two
    other veteran lawmakers, one a
    black man and the other an open-
    ly gay white woman, in a battle
    that threatened to cleave the party
    in two.
    Jones’s ascension has particu-
    lar resonance in Maryland, a po-
    litically progressive state that un-
    til Wednesday had not elevated a
    woman or a person of color into
    the top tier of power in the state
    capital.
    “Wow,” Jones (D-Baltimore
    County) said minutes after her
    election, running her hands along
    the polished rostrum. “I didn’t
    think I would be here when I left
    out of my house this morning.”
    The unanimous vote followed
    weeks of bruising public spats and
    clandestine maneuvering in An-
    napolis as Del. Dereck E. Davis
    (D-Prince George’s), an African
    American centrist, competed for
    the post against Del. Maggie
    McIntosh (D-Baltimore City), a
    white liberal who was the first
    openly gay lawmaker in the Gen-
    eral Assembly. Their historic race
    SEE MARYLAND ON A15
    2 firsts for Md. House: A black, female speaker
    BY NICK MIROFF
    AND MARIA SACCHETTI
    Looming over the Trump ad-
    ministration’s struggle to curb ille-
    gal immigration is a challenge that
    no amount of razor wire, troops or
    steel fencing can fix.
    The U.S. immigration court sys-
    tem is facing a backlog of 850,000
    cases, and it has fewer than 450
    judges nationwide to handle
    them. New asylum applications
    and other claims are piling up,
    creating long delays that Central
    American families arriving in rec-
    ord numbers know will allow
    them to remain in the United
    States for years while they wait.
    Trump’s critics blame his ad-
    ministration’s overzealous en-
    forcement approach for making
    the problem worse by arresting
    more people who can’t be quickly
    deported. But the delays have be-
    come a migration magnet as pow-
    erful as the U.S. economy or the
    desire to reunite with relatives
    living in the United States, admin-
    istration officials say.
    Since Trump took office, the
    backlog has swelled by more than
    200,000 cases. The president has
    grown so frustrated that he has
    been floating the idea of doing
    SEE IMMIGRATION ON A7
    Ballooning backlog of cases
    undercuts immigration agenda
    SARAH L. VOISIN/THE WASHINGTON POST
    Del. Adrienne Jones (D-Baltimore County) was chosen speaker of
    the Maryland House on Wednesday after having dropped out of
    what became a divisive race to succeed the late Michael E. Busch.
    CALLS MUELLER’S
    LETTER ‘SNITTY’
    Democrats say he misled
    public on key conclusions
    Venezuelan opposition’s
    rush to action leaves
    U.S. to mull next steps
    BY CAROL D. LEONNIG
    It was one of the most dramat-
    ic cases of potential obstruction
    of justice laid out by federal
    investigators: President Trump
    directing the top White House
    lawyer to seek the removal of
    special counsel Robert S. Muel-
    ler III — and then later pushing
    him to deny the episode.
    But Attorney General William
    P. Barr on Wednesday played
    down evidence that Trump
    sought to fire the head of the
    investigation bearing down on
    him, emphasizing in testimony
    before a Senate committee that
    the president may have had valid
    reasons for his actions.
    It was a surprise recasting of
    the account of then-White
    House counsel Donald McGahn,
    who told investigators that
    Trump called him twice in June
    2017 at home, pressuring him to
    intervene with the Justice De-
    partment to try to get Mueller
    removed. McGahn told federal
    investigators that he planned to
    resign rather than comply. And
    he said he later refused a de-
    mand by Trump that he write a
    letter denying news accounts of
    the episode.
    In Barr’s telling, however,
    Trump may have merely been
    SEE MCGAHN ON A16
    Testimony puts Trump’s actions
    in best light, despite probe’s findings
    SALWAN GEORGES/THE WASHINGTON POST
    During a tense Senate Judiciary Committee hearing, Attorney General William P. Barr denied he mischaracterized the Russia probe in a
    memo to Congress after revelations that the special counsel complained about it. He also withdrew from a House hearing set for today.
    A question of contempt
    Democrats debate best response
    to Barr’s refusal to testify. A17
    Migrants’ DNA to be tested
    Officials want proof that children
    with adults are related. A4
    A 2020 win at the border?
    Trump’s focus on asylum policies
    reflects reelection motivations. A6
    Standoff at embassy in D.C.
    An ambassador representing
    Guaidó speaks amid protests. B1
    SCATTERED STORMS – HIGH 87, LOW 66 washingtontimes.com $1.50
    PRICES MAY VARY OUTSIDE METROPOLITAN WASHINGTON AREA
    ★★
    THURSDAY, MAY 2, 2019
    INDEX American Scene A7 | Commentary B1 | Comics B12 | Dear Abby A11 | Editorials B2 | Horoscope A11 | Inside the Beltway A2 | Metro A10 | Nation A6 | Politics A3 | Sports B14 | Television A11 | World A8
    VOLUME 37, NUMBER 88
    7 7
    02803 87040
    POLITICS
    Despite party tension,
    Sanders doubles down
    on prisoner voting. A3
    METRO
    Maryland lawmakers
    pick fi rst black woman
    as House speaker. A10
    WORLD
    Report fi nds spike in
    violent attacks against
    Jewish people. A8
    NATION
    Slain college student
    hailed as hero for
    confronting gunman. A6
    Friday, May 17 | 8 PM
    Musical Journeys
    and the pursuit of excellence
    Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall & Arts Center
    northern virginia community college | alexandria
    an
    R
    Free tickets!
    usarmyband.com
    Walk-ins welcome without tickets
    at 7:45 if seating is available.
    Join us on a voyage that
    begins with a spark of initial
    interest and travels a path
    of increased dedication,
    commitment, and hard work.
    We are proud to feature the
    musicians who participated in
    the 2019 U.S. Army Orchestra
    Young Artist Competition.
    Free parking!
    BY DAVE BOYER AND STEPHEN DINAN
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES
    Border authorities have identifi ed more
    than 1,000 “fake families” over the past seven
    months featuring adults trying to use children
    who aren’t their own to sneak into the U.S.
    Homeland Security offi cials revealed the
    number Wednesday as they announced a
    pilot program to begin using DNA testing to
    match children and the adults trying to sneak
    across the U.S.-Mexico boundary with them.
    “It’s defi nitely an escalating trend that
    we’re seeing,” one department offi cial said
    of the fraudulent families.
    As the border spirals further out of control,
    President Trump sent Congress a request
    Wednesday for an emergency $4.5 billion
    infusion this year, warning that without
    the money the federal Health and Human
    Services Department will run out of cash to
    care for unaccompanied migrant children.
    HHS offi cials also acknowledged that a
    16-year-old unaccompanied boy died in the
    custody of one of its contract shelters.
    The boy, who wasn’t identifi ed beyond
    being Guatemalan, was arrested last month
    and sent to HHS on April 20 with no health
    complaints. The next morning, he became ill
    and had stints in and out of the hospital before
    IMMIGRATION
    DNA tests
    at border to
    help ID ‘fake
    families’
    Children increasingly
    used to ease crossing
    BY DAVE BOYER
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES
    President Trump watched from the White
    House on Wednesday as his yearlong eff ort
    to oust Venezuelan socialist leader Nicolas
    Maduro hung in the balance with no clear
    outcome from civil unrest that reached a
    violent climax this week.
    Aides said the president was following
    events in Caracas closely. National Security
    Adviser John R. Bolton convened a high-level
    meeting at the White House on short notice in
    midafternoon to discuss the administration’s
    next moves. Offi cials said military action was
    not imminent.
    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and his
    Russian counterpart, Foreign Minister Ser-
    gey Lavrov, traded blame in a phone call for
    VENEZUELA
    Trump, aides
    weigh options
    as Maduro
    clings to power
    BY CHRISTOPHER VONDRACEK
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES
    About 20,000 North Carolina teachers
    and their supporters marched on the state
    Capitol on International Workers’ Day as
    part of the Red4Ed movement, which is
    backed by the nation’s largest teachers
    union and has drawn criticism from Re-
    publican leaders across the country.
    Hoisting placards and sporting red T-
    shirts, teachers, counselors, bus drivers
    and cooks took to Raleigh on Wednesday
    with demands for a new minimum wage,
    an expansion of Medicaid and the hiring
    of additional support staff .
    They made a show of solidarity just a
    year after a similar number poured into the
    capital city in the fi rst teacher walkout in
    recent memory.
    Republicans and conservatives see a
    political operation masquerading as a rally
    NORTH CAROLINA
    Republicans see political
    rally in education disguise
    T
    eachers’ demands mirror Democrats’
    BY JEFF MORDOCK AND STEPHEN DINAN
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES
    House Democrats said they are considering
    holding Attorney General William Barr in contempt
    of Congress after he informed them he won’t meet
    their deadline for turning over the unredacted
    special counsel’s report and won’t appear to testify
    Thursday.
    Mr. Barr says Democrats changed the rules on
    him, souring the spirit of comity he had shown in
    agreeing to testify.
    Democrats said he was terrifi ed of facing the
    skilled interrogator they had arranged and was
    giving excuses.
    That clash came Wednesday evening, hours after
    Mr. Barr spent much of the day testifying across the
    Capitol in the Senate.
    He scolded Democrats for refusing to accept
    the results of special counsel Robert Mueller’s
    448-page report fi nding no evidence of successful
    coordination between Russia and President Trump
    to subvert the 2016 election.
    During fi ve hours of questions, Mr. Barr also
    INVESTIGATION
    Barr faces
    threat of
    contempt
    of Congress
    Refuses interrogation
    in House by lawyers
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    CLASHING WITH CONGRESS: Aft er a contentious hearing Wednesday before the Senate Judiciary Committee,
    Attorney General William Barr announced that he would not appear Th ursday for questioning by House lawmakers.
    BY STEPHEN DINAN
    THE WASHINGTON TIMES
    Attorney General William Barr
    revealed Wednesday that the Justice
    Department is looking into the pos-
    sibility that Russian operatives fed
    disinformation to the Hillary Clinton
    campaign during the 2016 presidential
    election season.
    Mr. Barr told a Senate Judiciary
    Committee hearing about the expanded
    scope of a review into “the activi-
    ties over the summer of 2016,” which
    included vehemently anti-Trump FBI
    senior offi cials making key decisions on
    the investigations of Mrs. Clinton and
    Republican candidate Donald Trump.
    One key question is how much the
    FBI relied on the dossier compiled by
    former British spy Christopher Steele,
    using information gleaned from Rus-
    sian sources, which helped spur the
    Trump-Russia collusion narrative. The
    dossier was funded by payments from
    the Clinton campaign and Democratic
    National Committee that were hidden
    in campaign fi nance reports behind
    payments to a law fi rm.
    Republican senators said it’s possible
    that Mr. Steele’s Russian sources were
    intentionally feeding him disinforma-
    tion, which then made it to the highest
    levels of the FBI. Indeed, former FBI
    Director James B. Comey’s fi rst per-
    sonal interaction with Mr. Trump was
    JUSTICE DEPARTMENT
    Barr confi rms probe of Russia-Clinton links
    FBI relied on dossier disinformation
    » see VENEZUELA | A9
    » see BARR | A5
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    SWARM OF MESSAGES: Th ousands of teachers and supporters marched
    to the North Carolina Capitol for the second year in a row on Wednesday with
    hopes that a more weighted Democrat legislature would meet their demands.
    » see CLINTON | A5
    » see TEACHERS | A7
    ▶ Bolton, Democrats clash. A4
    ▶ Maduro regime buckles down. A8
    » see IMMIGRATION | A7

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  5. America’s Page One
    WASHINGTON — Attorney
    General William P. Barr defended
    himself on Wednesday against
    withering criticism of his handling
    of the special counsel investiga-
    tion as Democrats accused of him
    of deceiving Congress and acting
    as a personal agent for President
    Trump rather than a steward of
    justice.
    At a contentious hearing
    marked by a deep partisan divide,
    Mr. Barr denied misrepresenting
    the investigation’s conclusions de-
    spite a newly revealed letter by
    the special counsel, Robert S.
    Mueller III, protesting the initial
    summary of its findings. Mr. Barr
    dismissed the letter as “a bit
    snitty” and the controversy over it
    as “mind-bendingly bizarre.”
    But in a series of aggressive in-
    terrogations, Democrats on the
    Senate Judiciary Committee ex-
    pressed indignation and asserted
    that the attorney general had
    been “purposely misleading,” en-
    gaged in “masterful hairsplitting”
    and even “lied to Congress.” Sev-
    eral Democrats on the committee,
    elsewhere in Congress and on the
    presidential campaign trail called
    for Mr. Barr’s resignation or even
    impeachment.
    The conflict escalated after-
    ward when Mr. Barr announced
    that he would not show up for a
    parallel hearing on Thursday be-
    fore the Democrat-controlled
    House Judiciary Committee. Mr.
    Barr objected to the format of
    questioning, which would have in-
    cluded questioning by staff law-
    yers, not just lawmakers. Demo-
    crats may now opt to subpoena
    him, setting up a possible show-
    down in court.
    “He is terrified of having to face
    a skilled attorney,” said Repre-
    sentative Jerrold Nadler of New
    York, the committee’s chairman.
    In just 11 weeks in office, Mr.
    Under Fire, Barr Defends
    Actions on Mueller Report
    Will Skip Hearing in
    House After Fierce
    Session in Senate
    By PETER BAKER
    Attorney General William P. Barr navigated aggressive questioning in the Senate on Wednesday.
    ERIN SCHAFF/THE NEW YORK TIMES
    Senator Mazie K. Hirono exco-
    riated the attorney general.
    ANDREW HARNIK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
    Continued on Page A14
    Female track athletes with na-
    turally elevated levels of testos-
    terone must decrease the hor-
    mone to participate in certain
    races at major competitions like
    the Olympics, the highest court in
    international sports said Wednes-
    day in a landmark ruling amid the
    pitched debate over who can com-
    pete in women’s events.
    The decision was a defeat for
    Caster Semenya, a two-time
    Olympic champion at 800 meters
    from South Africa, who had chal-
    lenged proposed limits placed on
    female athletes with naturally ele-
    vated levels of the muscle-build-
    ing hormone testosterone.
    At a time when the broader cul-
    ture is moving toward an accept-
    ance of gender fluidity, the ruling
    affirmed the sports world’s need
    for distinct gender lines, saying
    they were essential for the out-
    come of women’s events to be fair.
    “The gender studies folks have
    spent the last 20 years decon-
    structing sex and all of a sudden
    they’re facing an institution with
    an entirely opposite story,” said
    Doriane Lambelet Coleman, a law
    professor at Duke and an elite
    800-meter runner in the 1980s
    who served as an expert witness
    for track and field’s world govern-
    ing body. “We have to ask, ‘Is re-
    specting gender identity more im-
    portant or is seeing female bodies
    on the podium more important?’”
    Semenya’s biology has been un-
    der scrutiny for a decade, ever
    since she burst on the scene at the
    2009 world track and field cham-
    pionships and was subjected to
    sex tests after her victory. In
    South Africa, leaders complained
    of racism. The issue of whether a
    rare biological trait was causing
    an unfair advantage for Semenya
    and a small subset of women
    quickly morphed into a battle
    about privacy and human rights,
    and Semenya became its symbol.
    Sports Court Backs Distinct Gender Lines, in Defeat for Olympian
    By JERÉ LONGMAN
    and JULIET MACUR
    Caster Semenya, who has naturally high levels of testosterone, in a 1,500-meter race last year.
    SAEED KHAN/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE — GETTY IMAGES
    Continued on Page A11
    WASHINGTON — It was a for-
    eign policy role Joseph R. Biden
    Jr. enthusiastically embraced dur-
    ing his vice presidency: brow-
    beating Ukraine’s notoriously cor-
    rupt government to clean up its
    act. And one of his most memora-
    ble performances came on a trip
    to Kiev in March 2016, when he
    threatened to withhold $1 billion in
    United States loan guarantees if
    Ukraine’s leaders did not dismiss
    the country’s top prosecutor, who
    had been accused of turning a
    blind eye to corruption in his own
    office and among the political
    elite.
    The pressure campaign
    worked. The prosecutor general,
    long a target of criticism from
    other Western nations and inter-
    national lenders, was soon voted
    out by the Ukrainian Parliament.
    Among those who had a stake in
    the outcome was Hunter Biden,
    Mr. Biden’s younger son, who at
    the time was on the board of an en-
    ergy company owned by a Ukrain-
    ian oligarch who had been in the
    sights of the fired prosecutor gen-
    eral.
    Hunter Biden was a Yale-edu-
    cated lawyer who had served on
    the boards of Amtrak and a num-
    ber of nonprofit organizations and
    think tanks, but lacked any expe-
    rience in Ukraine and just months
    earlier had been discharged from
    the Navy Reserve after testing
    positive for cocaine. He would be
    paid about $50,000 per month for
    his work for the company,
    Burisma Holdings.
    The broad outlines of how the
    Bidens’ roles intersected in
    Ukraine have been known for
    some time. The former vice presi-
    dent’s campaign said that he had
    always acted to carry out United
    States policy without regard to
    any activities of his son, that he
    had never discussed the matter
    with Hunter Biden and that he
    learned of his son’s role with the
    Ukrainian energy company from
    news reports.
    But new details about Hunter
    Biden’s involvement, and a deci-
    sion this year by the current
    Ukrainian prosecutor general to
    reverse himself and reopen an in-
    vestigation into Burisma, have
    pushed the issue back into the
    For Biden, a Ukraine Matter That Won’t Go Away
    By KENNETH P. VOGEL
    and IULIIA MENDEL
    New Spotlight Falls on
    Son’s Employer in a
    Revived Inquiry
    Continued on Page A10
    VOL. CLXVIII . . . No. 58,315 © 2019 The New York Times Company
    NEW YORK, THURSDAY, MAY 2, 2019
    C M Y K Nxxx,2019-05-02,A,001,Bs-4C,E2
    NEWS ANALYSIS
    WASHINGTON — Nobody
    said regime change was going to
    be easy.
    President Trump’s top advis-
    ers woke up Tuesday believing
    that a rebellion in the Venezuelan
    military that day would galva-
    nize a popular uprising and
    topple a leader they have de-
    scribed as a reviled despot who
    must be replaced. But at day’s
    end, President Nicolás Maduro
    was still in power and Mr.
    Trump’s advisers were left to
    blame Cuba, Russia and three
    influential Venezuelan officials,
    who failed to switch sides, for
    frustrating their plans.
    The decision of the Venezue-
    lans to stand with Mr. Maduro —
    either because they were intimi-
    dated, got cold feet or never
    planned to defect — raised ques-
    tions about whether the United
    States had faulty intelligence
    about the ability of the opposition
    to peel away members of his
    government.
    It also raised questions about
    whether Mr. Trump’s aides had
    fallen victim to a misreading of
    events on the ground, or whether
    Mr. Trump, who officials say has
    sometimes outrun his aides in an
    enthusiasm for forcing out Mr.
    Maduro, might lose faith in the
    effort as it wears on.
    Mr. Maduro has been weak-
    ened at home and discredited
    abroad, but he remains a stub-
    born rival unwilling to step aside
    for the opposition leader, Juan
    Guaidó, recognized by the United
    States as the country’s de facto
    leader. While the administration
    got off to a sure-footed start on
    Venezuela, rallying dozens of
    countries against the Venezuelan
    president, critics said its re-
    sponse had become haphazard
    and chaotic as the crisis has
    dragged on.
    Mr. Trump’s aides banked on
    Mr. Guaidó’s call for mass pro-
    tests and the defection of the
    Venezuelan officials on Tuesday
    as a turning point in the three-
    month campaign to oust Mr.
    Pressure Rises
    After Failure
    In Venezuela
    Questions for the U.S.
    as Maduro Hangs On
    By MARK LANDLER
    and JULIAN E. BARNES
    Continued on Page A7
    U(D54G1D)y+=!:!&!#!}
    It was called the Economic Op-
    portunity Act, a measure intended
    to kick-start the sputtering post-
    recession economy in New Jersey,
    particularly in its struggling cit-
    ies. The state would award lucra-
    tive tax breaks to businesses if
    they moved to New Jersey or re-
    mained in the state, creating and
    retaining jobs.
    But before the bill was ap-
    proved by the Legislature, a se-
    ries of changes were made to its
    language in June 2013 that were
    intended to grant specific compa-
    nies hundreds of millions of dol-
    lars in additional tax breaks, with
    no public disclosure, according to
    interviews and documents ob-
    tained by The New York Times.
    Many of the last-minute
    changes to drafts of the bill were
    made by a real estate lawyer, Kev-
    in D. Sheehan, whose influential
    law firm has close ties to Demo-
    cratic politicians and legislative
    leaders in New Jersey.
    Mr. Sheehan was allowed by
    lawmakers to edit drafts of the bill
    in ways that opened up sizable tax
    breaks to his firm’s clients, ac-
    cording to a marked up copy of the
    legislation obtained by The Times,
    which identifies Mr. Sheehan’s
    changes.
    Nearly six years later, the fall-
    out from the legislation has set off
    an uproar in the State Capitol over
    allegations that the state’s $11 bil-
    lion in economic development pro-
    grams have been poorly managed
    corporate giveaways that have
    brought few benefits.
    How $11 Billion in Tax Breaks
    Has New Jersey in an Uproar
    By NICK CORASANITI and MATTHEW HAAG
    Continued on Page A22
    THE SCIENCE An issue raises hard
    questions about biology, fairness
    and gender identity. PAGE B7
    One professor’s quest to secure the
    future of a collection of women’s every-
    day clothing items. PAGE D1
    THURSDAY STYLES D1-8
    Rags or Riches?
    Capri has banned plastic and wants to
    limit boat traffic, too, to control the twin
    Italian ills: tourism and trash. PAGE A6
    INTERNATIONAL A4-12
    An Isle Preserving Its Beauty
    More people have been told that they
    are under investigation in the college-
    admissions scandal, while others worry
    that they soon will be. PAGE A20
    NATIONAL A13-20
    Admissions Scandal Widens
    The social media giant may create a
    privacy committee as part of a deal
    with regulators. PAGE B1
    BUSINESS B1-6
    Facebook Settlement Talks
    Stephen Curry helped lift a series that
    threatened to devolve amid feuds over
    officiating, Marc Stein writes. PAGE B7
    SPORTSTHURSDAY B7-12
    Warriors Put Complaints Aside
    Justin Gimelstob said he would resign
    from the ATP board to focus on resolving
    his personal and legal issues. PAGE B12
    Gimelstob Exits Tennis Board
    James Comey PAGE A27
    EDITORIAL, OP-ED A26-27
    A student who charged a gunman in a
    college classroom in Charlotte, N.C.,
    “saved lives,” but he died in the attack,
    officials said. PAGE A19
    Victim Hailed as a Hero
    Sedley Alley was executed based on
    scant physical evidence and a confession
    he said was coerced. His daughter hopes
    DNA testing will offer answers. PAGE A13
    Was Her Father a Murderer?
    Companies are starting to offer com-
    fortable, attractive undergarments for
    transgender men and women. PAGE D1
    A New Sexy for a New Time
    A murder placed focus on the region’s
    paramilitary groups. But economic
    stagnation drives violence, too. PAGE A4
    Conflict in Northern Ireland A man who said he was upset about
    criticism of President Trump threat-
    ened to kill former President Barack
    Obama and a congresswoman. PAGE A22
    NEW YORK A21-23
    Prison for Racist Threats
    WASHINGTON — When Attor-
    ney General William P. Barr sum-
    marized the special counsel’s con-
    clusions in a March letter, prompt-
    ing President Trump to crow that
    he had been exonerated, the spe-
    cial counsel’s prosecutors knew
    immediately what the public
    would learn weeks later: The let-
    ter was a sparse and occasionally
    misleading representation of their
    exhaustive findings.
    What followed was a dayslong,
    behind-the-scenes tussle over the
    first public presentation of one of
    the most consequential govern-
    ment investigations in American
    history.
    A richer picture of that battle
    emerged on Wednesday — one of
    testy letters (Mr. Barr described
    one as “snitty”) and at least one
    tense phone call between the spe-
    cial counsel, Robert S. Mueller III,
    and Mr. Barr. The two were long-
    time friends who found them-
    selves on opposite sides of an em-
    battled president.
    The growing evidence of a split
    between them also brought fresh
    scrutiny on Mr. Barr, who on at
    least three occasions in recent
    weeks has seemed to try to out-
    maneuver Mr. Mueller. First, he
    released his four-page letter on
    March 24 outlining investigators’
    findings; then he held an unusual
    news conference on the day the
    Mueller report was released; and
    on Tuesday night, the Justice De-
    partment put out a statement that
    significantly played down the con-
    cerns among Mr. Mueller’s team.
    In other words, Mr. Barr, who
    said at a Senate Judiciary Com-
    mittee hearing on Wednesday
    that “we have to stop using the
    criminal justice system as a politi-
    cal weapon,” now stands accused
    of doing exactly that.
    The drama began around mid-
    day on March 22, when a security
    officer working for Mr. Mueller ar-
    rived at the fifth floor of the Jus-
    tice Department to deliver copies
    of his highly anticipated report to
    the attorney general and his top
    aides.
    Mr. Barr worked through that
    weekend reading the report, his
    aides in occasional contact with
    members of Mr. Mueller’s team.
    Two days later, hours before Mr.
    Barr’s letter was sent to Congress,
    Mr. Mueller’s investigators re-
    minded Justice Department offi-
    cials about executive summaries
    they had written to be condensed,
    easily digestible versions of their
    448-page report.
    But Mr. Barr used almost none
    Private Tussle About
    Inquiry’s Summary
    Gets ‘a Bit Snitty’
    By MARK MAZZETTI
    and MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT
    Continued on Page A15
    Indigo is expanding to the United
    States with its new model for how a big
    bookstore chain can thrive. PAGE B1
    Selling Books and a Lifestyle
    Late Edition
    Today, variably cloudy, showers,
    warmer, high 73. Tonight, cloudy, a
    few showers, low 50. Tomorrow,
    showers or thunderstorms, cooler,
    high 59. Weather map, Page B12.
    $3.00
    Having grown up riding the New York City subways
    by herself at age 11 or 12, suburban New Jersey mom
    Kasia Bardi was fine the first time her 12-year-old
    boy, Fabrizio, rode an Uber alone to an “important
    soccer game.” ❚ Bardi ordered and monitored the five-minute
    drive, and it probably didn’t hurt that her son, even at that age, was
    6 feet tall and looked older than he was. ❚ Now, 15 and 6-foot-4,
    Bardi’s son rides in an Uber without an adult three to four times a
    year, though always as a “last resort,” Mom says. ❚ “A comfy mon-
    itored ride has got to be way safer than the subway in the ’80s,
    right?” Bardi asks, though she concedes that her neighbors, and
    for that matter her husband, aren’t quite as comfortable with the
    idea as she is. ❚ As it turns out, neither is Uber or Lyft.
    Would you let
    your kids ride
    by themselves?
    Parents weigh time and safety – and the rules
    Edward C. Baig USA TODAY
    See UNDERAGE, Page 3A
    USA TODAY ILLUSTRATION,
    AND GETTY IMAGES
    RIDE-SHARING
    $2.00 ❚ THE NATION'S NEWS THURSDAY
    QIJFAF-04005w(L)i
    ©COPYRIGHT 2019
    USA TODAY,
    A division of
    Gannett Co., Inc.
    SOURCE FBI
    JANET LOEHRKE/USA TODAY
    USA SNAPSHOTS©
    Bank heists down in the USA
    Bank robberies, burglaries
    and larcenies:
    0
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    3,033
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    ’10 ’18
    IN NEWS
    UNC Charlotte shooter
    chose specific building
    Former student charged with killing
    two, wounding four in classroom
    US military action in
    Venezuela possible
    Trump administration says all options
    on the table in effort to oust Maduro
    IN MONEY
    Would a rate drop
    boost the economy?
    After Trump advocates for cut, Fed
    leaves key interest rates unchanged
    IN SPORTS
    Kentucky Derby helps
    fuel bourbon boom
    Connection between race, state’s
    distilling industry impossible to miss
    IN LIFE
    ‘SpongeBob’ at 20:
    Why he still matters
    Kelly Lawler: Pop culture institution
    has shaped a generation of humor
    SEAN RAYFORD/GETTY IMAGES
    05.02.19
    ‘Big Bang Theory’
    prepares for end
    after epic run
    The CBS comedy found a formula to last
    for 12 years, but cheers, tears are likely
    as the cast absorbs reality. In Life
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    Barr’s testimony in a grueling four-
    hour Senate hearing, his first public re-
    marks since Mueller’s redacted report
    was publicly disclosed last month, had
    been widely anticipated. But the ses-
    sion took on new urgency in the hours
    before it opened when the Justice
    Department revealed that Mueller had
    privately objected to Barr’s initial sum-
    mary of the investigation, which he said
    “threatened to undermine” the purpose
    of the inquiry.
    Because Mueller’s office declined to
    draw a conclusion about whether Trump
    had committed obstruction, the attorney
    general told the panel that he acted to re-
    solve the question that had threatened
    to derail Trump’s presidency.
    WASHINGTON – Attorney General
    William Barr repeatedly clashed with
    lawmakers Wednesday over his han-
    dling of special counsel Robert Muell-
    er’s Russia investigation, rebutting
    Democrats’ complaints that he misrep-
    resented the report to favor President
    Donald Trump while defending his own
    conclusions that the president had not
    sought to obstruct the probe.
    In pointed exchanges, attorney general
    defends his handling of Mueller report
    William Barr repeatedly asserted that
    the report didn’t establish that a crime
    was committed. JACK GRUBER/USA TODAY
    Kevin Johnson and Bart Jansen
    USA TODAY
    See BARR, Page 3A
    “We’re out of it. We have
    to stop using the criminal
    justice process as a
    political weapon.”
    Attorney General William Barr
    Barr, lawmakers do battle
    WASHINGTON – Sexual assaults
    in the military rose nearly 38% from
    2016 to 2018, according to survey re-
    sults obtained by USA TODAY.
    That spike in crime within the
    ranks comes after years of focused ef-
    fort and resources to eradicate it.
    The report, due to be released
    Thursday by the Pentagon, surveyed
    Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine
    personnel in 2018. Based on the
    survey, there were about 20,500 in-
    stances of unwanted sexual contact –
    an increase over the 14,900 estimated
    in the last biennial survey in 2016. Un-
    wanted sexual contact ranges from
    groping to rape.
    Enlisted female troops ages 17 to 24
    were at the highest risk of being
    assaulted, said Nathan Galbreath,
    deputy director of the Pentagon’s
    Sexual Assault Prevention and Re-
    sponse Office. The Pentagon will
    target troops in that age range for pre-
    vention efforts, he said.
    “We’re very concerned about that,”
    Galbreath said.
    More than 85% of victims knew
    their assailant. Alcohol was involved
    in 62% of the total assaults.
    The findings require Congress to
    intervene, said Rep. Jackie Speier, D-
    Calif., chairwoman of the Armed Ser-
    vices Committee’s personnel panel.
    “The department must accept that
    current programs are simply not
    working,” Speier said. “Congress
    must lead the way in forcing the de-
    partment to take more aggressive ap-
    proaches to fighting this scourge.”
    The Pentagon is set to release the
    recommendations of a task force
    formed at the urging of Sen. Martha
    McSally, R-Ariz., to deal with sexual
    assaults in the military. McSally, a re-
    tired Air Force officer and fighter pilot,
    revealed during an Armed Services
    Committee meeting in March that she
    Military
    sexual
    assaults
    rise 38%
    Troops reported more
    than 20,000 instances
    Tom Vanden Brook
    USA TODAY
    See ASSAULTS, Page 6A
    USA TODAY EXCLUSIVE
    “What’s frustrating is that the brass
    keeps refusing to consider any bold
    changes like reforming the military
    justice system.”
    Don Christensen
    Protect Our Defenders
    * * * * * *
    THURSDAY, MAY 2, 2019 ~ VOL. CCLXXIII NO. 102 WSJ.com HHHH $4.00
    DJIA 26430.14 g 162.77 0.6% NASDAQ 8049.64 g 0.6% STOXX 600 391.09 g 0.1% 10-YR.TREAS. g 2/32, yield 2.511% OIL $63.60 g $0.31 GOLD $1,281.40 g $1.40 EURO $1.1195 YEN 111.38
    Bramson has a home and
    raises horses.
    The fight over the future
    of Barclays will help deter-
    mine whether any of Eu-
    rope’s banks can retain global
    ambitions.
    For centuries, the U.K. was
    synonymous with interna-
    tional banking, and London
    was the first stop for compa-
    nies and governments look-
    ing to raise money. Then its
    banks ventured overseas to
    grab a greater share of lend-
    ing and trading, bringing
    some of them close to death
    during the financial crisis a
    decade ago.
    Today, U.S. banks domi-
    nate fundraising and trading,
    buoyed by healthier balance
    sheets and robust American
    capital markets.
    Mr. Staley has a vision for
    Barclays, which absorbed
    much of Lehman Brothers af-
    ter its collapse. He wants it
    to become a compact version
    PleaseturntopageA10
    Jes Staley runs one of the
    last full-service banks left in
    Europe that compete with
    Wall Street. The way the 62-
    year-old American banker
    sees it, his restructuring of
    U.K.-based Barclays PLC has
    primed it to take on the likes
    of Goldman Sachs Group Inc.
    and Morgan Stanley.
    British-born investor Ed-
    ward Bramson couldn’t agree
    less, and his New York firm
    has bought a sizable stake in
    Barclays. He is trying to force
    the bank to scale back its
    Wall Street ambitions, to be-
    come a consumer and com-
    mercial lender with smaller
    investment-banking opera-
    tions.
    So far, Mr. Staley, the chief
    executive, is having none of
    it. “He wants us to retreat
    into a foxhole? He should go
    back to Connecticut,” Mr.
    Staley has told colleagues, re-
    ferring to the state where Mr.
    BY MARGOT PATRICK
    Barclays CEO
    Wages Fight to Stay
    Wall Street Player
    A big investor, who is seeking a board seat,
    opposes Jes Staley’s global ambitions
    Billy Joel
    Didn’t Start
    The Fire
    i i i
    But his helicopter,
    and others, are
    irking Long Island
    BY LESLIE BRODY
    CENTRE ISLAND, N.Y.—In a
    decade as mayor of a wealthy
    enclave perched on Long Is-
    land’s North Shore, Lawrence
    Schmidlapp has presided over
    countless meetings of the
    board of trustees, which nor-
    mally draw just a handful of
    neighbors.
    There is one issue that can
    pack Village Hall: Whether to
    ban personal helipads.
    “We can run out of chairs,”
    says Mr. Schmidlapp, who is
    also the police commissioner
    and husband of the village
    clerk.
    Four private helipads sit
    among roughly 185 households
    on this small island about 40
    miles east of Midtown Manhat-
    tan on the northern coast of
    Long Island. A helicopter flight
    home from Manhattan can take
    less than 15 minutes. By con-
    trast, driving in evening rush
    hour can take about two hours.
    PleaseturntopageA10
    Oracle will cut your Amazon bill in half when you run the same (i) data warehouse workload on Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse; or (ii) transaction
    processing workload on Oracle Autonomous Transaction Processing, as compared to running on Amazon AWS. Pricing is based on Oracle’s standard
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    Attorney General William Barr testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday about his handling of the Mueller report.
    opposition leader Juan Guaidó.
    The talks would mark the
    first known contact between
    the government and the opposi-
    tion since Mr. Guaidó declared
    himself interim president in
    late January, sparking the most
    serious challenge yet to Mr. Ma-
    duro’s rule. Fifty-four countries,
    including the U.S., recognize the
    opposition leader as Venezu-
    ela’s legitimate president.
    “We know that a part, a
    large part, a majority of the
    high command were talking
    with the Supreme Court and
    Juan Guaidó about a change, a
    change in government, with the
    departure of Maduro, and with
    guarantees for the military,”
    Mr. Abrams told Venezuelan
    online TV network VPItv on
    Wednesday.
    The opposition believed it
    was close enough to a deal that
    PleaseturntopageA8
    WASHINGTON—Attorney
    General William Barr criticized
    Robert Mueller’s decision not to
    reach a conclusion about
    whether President Trump ob-
    structed justice during a conten-
    tious hearing that laid bare a
    rift between him and the special
    counsel over the politically
    charged investigation.
    In his first congressional tes-
    timony since releasing a re-
    dacted version of Mr. Mueller’s
    448-page report, Mr. Barr faced
    pointed criticism from Senate
    Democrats over his handling of
    the findings on Russian election
    interference in 2016.
    for Thursday over disagree-
    ments about the format of the
    appearance—and that an unre-
    dacted version of the Mueller
    report, which had been subpoe-
    naed by the committee,
    wouldn’t be provided.
    Rep. Jerrold Nadler (D., N.Y.),
    who leads that committee, also
    threatened to hold the attorney
    general in contempt of Con-
    gress—a prelude to a possible
    court battle—for his continued
    refusal to turn over the unre-
    dacted Mueller report, a poten-
    tially big escalation of tensions
    between Democratic lawmakers
    and the Trump administration.
    Mr. Barr has said he can’t re-
    lease the entire unredacted re-
    port in part because it contains
    grand-jury material and infor-
    mation about ongoing criminal
    cases that can’t be made public.
    The attorney general has invited
    some top lawmakers and their
    staff to view a less redacted re-
    port in a special facility, an offer
    Democrats have refused.
    Wednesday’s Senate hearing
    offered a dramatic public dis-
    play of the behind-the-scenes
    jockeying to give Mr. Mueller’s
    findings their proper airing.
    It came just after the Justice
    PleaseturntopageA4
    “If [Mr. Mueller] felt he
    shouldn’t go down a path of
    making a traditional prosecutive
    decision, then he shouldn’t have
    investigated,” Mr. Barr told the
    Senate Judiciary Committee
    Wednesday. “That was the time
    to pull up.”
    Meanwhile, the Justice De-
    partment late Wednesday told
    House Democrats that Mr. Barr
    wouldn’t appear at a Judiciary
    Committee hearing scheduled
    By Sadie Gurman,
    Byron Tau
    and Kristina Peterson
    Attorney General, Democrats
    Clash Over Mueller Report
    WASHINGTON—Federal Re-
    serve officials agreed to keep
    their benchmark interest rate
    unchanged and signaled com-
    fort that their wait-and-see
    posture had steadied the econ-
    omy after fears of a slowdown
    had sent markets reeling at
    the end of last year.
    Fed Chairman Jerome Pow-
    ell, speaking at a news confer-
    ence Wednesday, played down
    concerns that recent soft in-
    flation might hint at broader
    economic weakness. He re-
    peatedly highlighted individual
    price declines that could prove
    transitory and, in doing so,
    pushed back against some
    market hopes the Fed might
    be preparing to lower interest
    rates later this year.
    “Overall the economy con-
    tinues on a healthy path, and
    the committee believes that
    the current stance of policy is
    appropriate,” Mr. Powell said
    after officials ended their two-
    day policy-setting meeting.
    For now, “we don’t see a
    strong case for moving [rates]
    in either direction,” he said.
    All 10 members of the cen-
    tral bank’s rate-setting com-
    mittee, comprising the five
    Fed governors and five regional
    PleaseturntopageA2
    BY NICK TIMIRAOS
    Powell
    Signals
    No Need
    For Cuts
    Markets slide as Fed
    holds rates steady and
    chairman plays down
    low-inflation worries
    Jawbone Connected to Early Human Species
    CONTENTS
    Business News...... B3
    Capital Account.... A2
    Crossword.............. A14
    Heard on Street. B12
    Life & Arts....... A11-13
    Management.......... B5
    Markets............. B11-12
    Opinion.............. A15-17
    Sports....................... A14
    Technology............... B4
    U.S. News............. A2-6
    Weather................... A14
    World News........ A7-9
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    >
    What’s
    News
     Barr criticized Mueller’s
    decision not to reach a con-
    clusion about whether
    Trump obstructed justice
    during a contentious Senate
    hearing that laid bare a rift
    between the attorney general
    and the special counsel. A1
     Venezuela’s opposition
    held secret negotiations
    with members of Maduro’s
    inner circle in recent
    months in an ill-fated bid to
    get him to leave power. A1
     A family from China paid
    a college counselor $6.5 mil-
    lion for help securing a spot
    at Stanford and connected to
    the counselor via a Morgan
    Stanley financial adviser. A6
     May fired her defense
    chief, saying he leaked infor-
    mation surrounding a review
    into the use of Huawei gear in
    the U.K.’s telecom network. A9
     The Trump administration
    requested $4.5 billion from
    Congress to respond to the
    growing surge of migrants
    at the southern border. A4
     The administration urged
    an appeals court to strike
    down the entire ACA, pre-
    senting its position oppos-
    ing all of the health law. A4
     Sri Lankan authorities
    released the names of the
    bombers in the Easter attacks
    after completing DNA tests
    to confirm their identities. A7
     The administration has
    hired consultants to estimate
    potential losses in the govern-
    ment’s student-loan portfolio,
    and is weighing selling all
    or portions of the debt. A6
     A British judge sentenced
    Assange to 50 weeks in jail
    for skipping bail in 2012. A9
    Fed officials agreed to
    hold their benchmark
    interest rate steady and
    signaled comfort that their
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    steadied the economy. A1
     U.S. stocks fell, with the
    Dow down 0.6% at the close
    after the Fed reiterated that
    it will stay patient. Treasury
    prices fluctuated before
    ultimately ending lower. B11
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    billion from Apple as part
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    and social issues. B1
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    ation, elevating studio Pres-
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     CVS reported stronger-
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    posted divergent earnings,
    with MetLife’s profit in-
    creasing 8% and Pruden-
    tial’s dropping 32%. B10
     E-cigarette maker NJOY
    is pursuing a funding round
    that would value the firm
    at as much as $5 billion. B3
     UBiome’s co-chiefs have
    gone on leave in the wake
    of a search of the com-
    pany’s offices by the FBI. B3
     Carlyle posted stronger
    profit for the first quarter,
    as the private-equity firm
    recorded gains in invest-
    ment income and fees. B10
    Business&Finance
    World-Wide
    DONGJU ZHANG/LANZHOU UNIVERSITY
    A fossil jaw found in Tibet’s Himalayan highlands belongs to a vanished human species called
    Denisovans, deepening the mystery of human evolution in Asia, a new study said Wednesday. A6
    Venezuela’s opposition held
    secret talks with members of
    President Nicolás Maduro’s in-
    ner circle in recent months in
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    duro to leave power and install
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    ter Gen. Vladimir Padrino,
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    dential guard commander and
    head of military intelligence,
    Gen. Iván Rafael Hernández.
    The goal was to remove Mr.
    Maduro and restore democracy
    in the country, according to U.S.
    special envoy Elliott Abrams
    and people close to Venezuelan
    BY DAVID LUHNOW
    AND JOSÉ DE CÓRDOBA
    Caracas, Opposition
    Held Transition Talks
    ANDREW HARNIK/ASSOCIATED PRESS
     Stocks dive, Treasurys end
    lower.............................................. B11
     Heard on the Street: Low
    inflation dilemma for Fed... B12
    P2JW122000-6-A00100-17FFFB5178F

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    ELIZABETH RENZETTI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A13
    KONRAD YAKABUSKI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A13
    JOHN DOYLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A14
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    LIFE & ARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A14
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    OPINION & ANALYSIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B4
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    OBITUARIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B19
    ONTARIO EDITION ■
    THURSDAY, MAY 2, 2019 ■
    GLOBEANDMAIL.COM
    British Columbia has filed a con-
    stitutional challenge to block Al-
    berta Premier Jason Kenney
    from using a newly proclaimed
    law to cut off oil shipments,
    amid a deepening conflict over
    the Trans Mountain pipeline,
    petroleum shipments and gaso-
    line prices.
    Mr. Kenney’s decision to move
    ahead on legislation that was
    passed but never brought into
    force by the previous NDP gov-
    ernment opened up the first of
    several legal fights for his United
    Conservatives, all focused on his
    central campaign pledge to push
    back against opponents of pipe-
    lines and the oil industry. Mr.
    Kenney proclaimed the law im-
    mediately after he was sworn in
    on Tuesday, but said he doesn’t
    intend to immediately begin
    turning off the taps.
    The conflict is also playing in-
    to growing frustration in B.C.
    over gasoline prices that have
    topped $1.70 a litre at some sta-
    tions. Mr. Kenney is urging Brit-
    ish Columbians to blame Pre-
    mier John Horgan and his oppo-
    sition to the Trans Mountain ex-
    pansion for increases at the
    pumps. Mr. Horgan, in turn, in-
    sisted that the gas-price issue has
    nothing to do with the Trans
    Mountain debate and instead
    called on the pipeline’s new
    owner, the federal government,
    to intervene by ensuring that
    more refined oil products reach
    the B.C. market.
    Mr. Kenney, whose party un-
    seated the New Democrats in the
    April 16 provincial election, ac-
    cused Mr. Horgan’s government
    of holding up permits and said
    the B.C. Premier’s opposition, in-
    cluding participating in a Federal
    Court of Appeal case that ulti-
    mately stalled the Trans Moun-
    tain expansion, has been “deeply
    frustrating” for Albertans.
    “We will do what’s necessary
    to protect our interests,” Mr. Ken-
    ney said in Edmonton on
    Wednesday. “The campaign to
    landlock Alberta’s resources, re-
    sulting in the failure of several
    pipeline projects to Canada’s
    West and East Coasts, has been
    economically devastating and
    has contributed to the jobs crisis
    in this province.”
    The Trans Mountain expan-
    sion project is currently stalled
    after a court ruling last year,
    prompting a subsequent review
    and additional consultations
    with First Nations. Federal cabi-
    net faces a June deadline on
    whether to reapprove the pro-
    ject.
    OIL, A19
    B.C. challenges Alberta’s oil-embargo law
    Province to ask court
    to block Kenney from
    using legislation to
    restrict energy exports
    as conflict deepens
    over Trans Mountain
    JUSTIN GIOVANNETTI EDMONTON
    JAMES KELLER CALGARY
    JUSTINE HUNTER VICTORIA
    Alberta Premier Jason
    Kenney and Minister of
    Energy Sonya Savage
    arrive at an Edmonton
    press conference on
    Wednesday to discuss
    the new oil-embargo law
    that was proclaimed
    Tuesday, on the
    government’s first day
    of power.
    JASON FRANSON
    /THE CANADIAN PRESS
    Over the past few decades,
    the Olympic movement
    has slowly ossified into
    party planning.
    The Olympics continues on as
    a successful – and, for some peo-
    ple, profitable – idea. But the
    “movement?” There isn’t much
    to speak of.
    There’s no leadership on
    pressing issues of the day or
    much bringing of light to dark-
    ness, though the International
    Olympic Committee loves to
    speechify about such things.
    Once a breaker of barriers, the
    Olympics has become a brand
    champion instead.
    Well, careful what you wish
    for.
    Wednesday’s decision to com-
    pel South African sprinter Caster
    Semenya to alter her testoster-
    one levels in order to compete
    changes that calculation. The
    Games are now a forward salient
    in the culture wars.
    From this point on, if you
    would like to have an argument
    about our two genders and the
    blurring line between them, the
    Olympics is where you can go to
    have it.
    Like every great athlete, Ms.
    Semenya was born with unusual
    genetic advantages. Unlike most
    others, hers are measurable with
    a chemistry set.
    As a hyperandrogenic compet-
    itor, Ms. Semenya produces far
    more testosterone than the aver-
    age woman, which, it is suggest-
    ed, translates directly into phys-
    ical performance. To her detrac-
    tors, Ms. Semenya is a doper, only
    she happens to do it naturally.
    If Ms. Semenya were averagely
    excellent – say, the fifth-best 800-
    metre runner in the world – one
    imagines people wouldn’t care so
    much. There’d be a lot of room
    for open-mindedness in that in-
    stance.
    KELLY, A9
    With Semenya’s loss on testosterone ruling,
    Olympics to play host to an unwinnable debate
    CATHAL KELLY
    South Africa's 800-metre gold-medal winner Caster Semenya can now
    choose to appeal, spend more time on the sidelines or switch to a longer
    distance, where testosterone rules do not apply. ANJA NIEDRINGHAUS/AP
    OPINION
    U.S. Attorney-General William
    Barr is insisting President Donald
    Trump did not obstruct justice
    when he tried to thwart the probe
    into Russian election interference
    – and even said he will investigate
    the investigation.
    Mr. Barr is also facing accusa-
    tions of lying to Congress last
    month when he failed to disclose
    a letter from special counsel Rob-
    ert Mueller criticizing Mr. Barr’s
    handling of Mr. Mueller’s final re-
    port.
    Rather than defuse criticisms
    that he has run interference for
    the President, Mr. Barr’s four-
    hour appearance before a Senate
    committee Wednesday fanned
    the flames.
    “That’s not a crime,” Mr. Barr
    said when asked about the Presi-
    dent’s efforts to get then-White
    House counsel Don McGahn to lie
    about Mr. Trump’s orders to have
    Mr. Mueller fired.
    The Attorney-General also as-
    serted that Mr. Trump “fully co-
    operated” with Mr. Mueller’s
    probe, even though the President
    tried to get the previous attorney-
    general to stop Mr. Mueller from
    investigating Mr. Trump’s cam-
    paign.
    And when asked about at-
    tempts by Mr. Trump’s associates
    to obtain compromising informa-
    tion on the Democrats from Rus-
    sian operatives, Mr. Barr said “I’m
    not sure what you mean.”
    Hours after the Senate hearing,
    Mr. Barr declined to attend a sec-
    ond session before a House of
    Representatives legislative com-
    mittee Thursday.
    BARR, A19
    Barr defends handling of Mueller report,
    tells Senate that Trump didn’t obstruct justice
    ADRIAN MORROW
    U.S. CORRESPONDENT
    WASHINGTON
    In 1896, Swedish chemist Svante Arrhenius made a pres-
    cient calculation that showed the vast quantities of carbon
    dioxide released into the atmosphere by burning coal and
    other fossil fuels would eventually cause the planet to get
    warmer.
    Little did he realize that the effect he described was al-
    ready under way and being dutifully recorded by a ready-
    made monitoring system distributed around the globe in
    the form of trees.
    Now, scientists have tapped into
    that record and demonstrated that
    the human effect on Earth’s climate
    can be traced back to the turn of
    the last century, when it began
    leaving its indelible mark on the
    growth patterns of tree rings. What
    the tree rings reveal matches what
    climate models predict should have
    happened given the basic proper-
    ties of greenhouse gases and the
    amount of energy the sun supplies
    to the atmosphere.
    “The models are saying that we
    should see the fingerprint of hu-
    man-forced climate change in the
    early 20th century, and the tree
    rings confirm that,” said Kate Mar-
    vel, a climate scientist with NASA’s
    Goddard Institute for Space Stud-
    ies in New York, and lead author
    on the analysis, published Wednesday in the journal
    Nature.
    The result is significant for two reasons, Dr. Marvel and
    her colleagues say. First, because it provides an alternative
    way to gauge how greenhouse gases and other industrial
    pollutants have influenced drought patterns over time.
    RINGS, A19
    Root of change: Tree rings
    reveal 120 years of human
    influence on climate
    IVAN SEMENIUK
    SCIENCE REPORTER
    The models
    are saying that
    we should see
    the fingerprint
    of human-forced
    climate change
    in the early 20th
    century, and
    the tree rings
    confirm that.
    KATE MARVEL
    CLIMATE SCIENTIST
    WITH NASA’S
    GODDARD INSTITUTE
    FOR SPACE STUDIES
    EDUCATION
    Nipissing University probes student-
    teacher’s boasts that he raised doubts
    about the Holocaust in a middle-school class
    A4
    REPORT ON BUSINESS
    CPPIB says it will back an investor group’s
    bid to end Bombardier’s share structure
    B1
    Quinta-Feira, 2 De Maio De 2019
    ANO 99 ┆ Nº 32.901 ediçãO NAciONAl ┆ cONclUÍdA ÀS 21H13 ┆ R$ 5,00
    D E S D E 1 9 2 1 U M J O R NA L A S E RV I Ç O D O B R A S I L
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    págiNAS viStAS 204.579.278
    viSitANteS úNicOS 27.906.536
    Repressãochavista
    aumentaesufoca
    movimentoopositor
    Juan guaidó diz que haverá protestos diários até a queda
    de Maduro, mas cancela principal ato após cerco policial
    Umdiaapósaoposiçãoini-
    ciar um movimento para
    deporNicolásMadurocom
    apoioparcialdosmilitares,
    asforçasgovernistasampli-
    aram a repressão e desfize-
    ramontem20pontosdemo-
    bilização em Caracas.
    Pelamanhã,oautoprocla-
    madopresidentedaVenezu-
    ela,JuanGuaidó,fezumdis-
    curso no qual afirmou que
    haveráatosdiáriosatéade-
    posição do ditador.
    Àtarde,porém,agentesda
    GuardaNacionalBolivariana
    bloquearamoacessoavári-
    as partes dacapitale impe-
    diramarealizaçãodoprinci-
    palprotestododia,quecon-
    taria com o líder opositor.
    Com o enfraquecimento
    dasmanifestaçõesanticha-
    vistas,Maduroafirmouque
    jamaisexistiráumpresiden-
    te “marionete” dos EUA no
    Palácio de Miraflores, em
    referência a Guaidó.
    O presidente Jair Bolso-
    naro (PSL) negou ter havi-
    dofracassodolevantecon-
    traoditador.“Nãotemder-
    rota nenhuma. (...) Existe
    uma fissura sim, que cada
    vez se aproxima da cúpula
    das Forças Armadas.”
    Oagravamentodacriseno
    paísvizinhofeztriplicaron-
    tem o número de venezue-
    lanos que cruzaram a fron-
    teira com Roraima, segun-
    doaCasaCivil.MundoA10eA12
    Análise Igor Gielow
    EUAeRússiaelevamotom,
    masédifícilparaambosir
    alémdissoagora A12
    Daigo Oliva
    Faltam a Guaidó oratória,
    repertório e carisma para
    liderar a oposição A2
    Antes de escalada da
    crise, Grupo de Lima
    pediu posição firme da
    ONU contra Maduro A14
    Bolsonaro
    orientaórgãos
    a reaver posse
    sem mandado
    O governo de Jair Bolso-
    naro(PSL)orientouosór-
    gãosfederais,pormeioda
    Advocacia-GeraldaUnião,
    aretomarapossedeimó-
    veispúblicosocupadosou
    invadidospormanifestan-
    tes sem acionar a Justiça.
    Antes,aAGUrecebiaum
    pedido para entrar com
    umaaçãodereintegração.
    Comanovanorma,osges-
    tores dos prédios podem
    chamar a PF para retirar
    os ocupantes. Poder A4
    Presidente do TJ-
    MG prestou favor
    a Pimentel, diz PF
    Poder A6
    PRB usa assessores
    na manutenção de
    escritório em SP
    AssessoresdoLegislativo
    federal,estadualoumuni-
    cipallotadosemgabinetes
    demembrosdoPRB(Par-
    tidoRepublicanoBrasilei-
    ro)usamohoráriodetra-
    balho para atuar em bra-
    ços políticos e religiosos
    da sigla. O PRB nega irre-
    gularidades. Cotidiano B1
    Fimdemonopólio
    dogáspodeatrair
    aportedeR$240bi
    Estudo que serve de base
    para a proposta prevê in-
    vestimentosdeR$240bi-
    lhõescasoametaderedu-
    çãodopreçosejaatingida.
    Osrecursosseriamusados
    paraampliaçãodainfraes-
    truturadeabastecimento
    eaumentodecapacidade
    industrial. Mercado A17
    Mourão, Moro e Olavo
    de Carvalho recebem
    Ordem de Rio Branco A6
    Rede D’Or abre hospital
    de luxo em SP em meio
    a disputa com a Amil B5
    STF suspende regra da
    reforma e proíbe grávida
    em local insalubre A18
    Por medo de milícia,
    famílias de Muzema não
    pedem indenização B3
    Fernando Schüler
    Fraturado, Brasil
    precisa encontrar
    novos consensos
    Imaginoumpaísquepode
    darcertoseencontrarmos
    ojeitobrasileirodecombi-
    nar coisas que na retórica
    políticasoamdivergentes:
    incentivosdemercadoega-
    rantiadedireitos. PoderA8
    O cientista político Fernando Schüler
    passa a escrever às quintas em poder
    Haddad e Maria
    Hermínia terão
    colunas na Folha
    Poder A8
    Ditador no labirinto
    Equívocos superiores
    Acercaderecrudescimen-
    todatensãonaVenezuela.
    Sobre ofensiva do gover-
    no contra universidades.
    editoriais A2
    Turismo D1
    pôr do sol leva
    visitantes a pântano
    na costa de taiwan
    Ilustrada C1
    500 anos após morrer,
    da vinci continua a
    gerar controvérsias
    Manifestantesajudamcinegrafistaatingidoporgáslacrimogêneoemprotestonacapitalfrancesa;mobilizaçõesnaeuropaforammarcadasportensão MundoA15
    atos de 1º de maio em paris têm 38 feridos e quase 400 detidos
    alain Jocard/aFP
    desempregadosemeventodascentraissindicaisparamar-
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    pouCa festa, pouCo empreGo
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    Der ehemalige SPÖ-Vorsitzen-
    de und Kanzler Christian Kern
    soll in ein Aufsichtsgremium
    der russischen Staatsbahnen
    einziehen.
    Nicht der auch noch! Ehema-
    lige Top-Politiker sind in Wla-
    dimir Putins Reich bereits hef-
    tigst engagiert. Der ehemalige
    ÖVP-Kanzler Wolfgang Schüs-
    sel soll in den Verwal-
    tungsrat des riesigen
    Ölkonzerns Lukoil ein-
    rücken. Der frühere
    ÖVP-Finanzminister Hans Jörg
    Schelling ist Berater des russi-
    schen Gasgiganten Gazprom für
    den Bau der Nordsee-Pipeline
    Nord Stream 2.
    In Russlands Konzernwelt
    geschieht nichts ohne die Po -
    litik, konkret ohne Putin. Die
    Nord-Stream-Pipeline, zu de-
    ren Promotoren der Putin-
    Freund und ehemalige deut-
    sche Kanzler Gerhard Schröder
    gehört, ist in der EU heftigst um-
    stritten. Der US-Thinktank Cen-
    ter for Strategic and Interna -
    tional Studies (CSIS), der den
    Republi kanern nahesteht, hat
    kürzlich eine äußerst kritische
    Studie über Österreich als Ein-
    fallstor für russische Interessen
    in der EU veröffentlicht. Sie
    wurde der Begleitung
    von Finanzminister
    Hartwig Löger beim
    jüngsten Besuch in den
    USA kritisch vorgehalten.
    Putin erneuert soeben wieder
    seine Attacken auf die Ukraine.
    Die Annexion der Ostukraine
    steht im Raum. Die EU wird
    möglicherweise reagieren müs-
    sen. Das ist keine gute Zeit für
    einen österreichische Exkanz-
    ler und Sozialdemokraten, Lob-
    byist für russische Interessen
    zu werden.
    Russian Connection
    RAU
    ***
    Warum die Steuerreform
    nach 2022 verpuffen könnte
    THEMA Seiten 2, 3, Kommentar Seite 28
    E-Scooter-Fahrer sind
    versichert – oder nicht
    GELDSTANDARD Seite 11
    Leonardo – Popstar
    und Universalgenie
    KULTUR Seiten 21, 22
    Köstinger bestätigt
    Milliardenzahlungen
    für Klimasünden
    Österreich muss wegen verfehlter Ziele bis
    zu 6,6 Milliarden an CO
    2
    -Rechten zukaufen
    Wien – Der große Wurf in Sachen
    Ökologisierung blieb bei der am
    Dienstag präsentierten Steuer -
    reform aus. Angesichts der ver-
    fehlten Klimaschutzziele wäre die-
    ser aber dringend notwendig: Bis
    2030 muss Österreich ohne zu-
    sätzliche Maßnahmen Emissions-
    zertifikate in der Höhe von bis zu
    6,6 Milliarden Euro zukaufen,
    bestätigte Umweltministerin Eli-
    sabeth Köstinger (ÖVP) in einer
    parlamentarischen Anfragebeant-
    wortung Schätzungen von Wis-
    senschaftern.
    Zwar hat die Republik die natio-
    nalen Klimaziele, die mit der EU
    vereinbart wurden, bereits 2017
    überschritten, bis 2020 fallen auf-
    grund ungenutzter Emissionsrech-
    te aus früheren Jahren jedoch kei-
    ne Kosten für den öffentlichen
    Haushalt an. Anschließend müs-
    sen sich Bund und Länder die Kos-
    ten für zugekaufte Zertifikate tei-
    len. In der Berechnung geht das
    Umweltministerium von einem
    Preis von 20 bis 100 Euro je Ton-
    ne CO
    2
    -Äquivalent aus.
    In der Anfrage der Liste Jetzt äu-
    ßerte sich die Ministerin auch zur
    CO
    2
    -Steuer, die bisher von der Re-
    gierung abgelehnt wurde. Köstin-
    ger gab zu, dass eine solche Abga-
    be ein Beitrag zur Dekarbonisie-
    rung des Energie- und Verkehrs-
    systems sein könnte. Ein CO
    2
    -Min-
    destpreis würde das EU-Emis-
    sionshandelssystem „sinnvoll er-
    gänzen“. Die Regierung stehe
    einem Mindestpreis mit Ausrich-
    tung auf den Stromsektor daher
    positiv gegenüber.
    Die Vernachlässigung des Kli-
    maschutzes in der Steuerreform
    wurde von Opposition und Um-
    welt-NGOs scharf kritisiert. Die
    Wifo-Ökonomin Margit Schrat-
    zenstaller nannte die fehlende Öko-
    logisierung im Standard-Inter-
    view gar das „größte Versäumnis
    der Steuerreform“. (red) Seite 15
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    ab 16:00 Uhr
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    GeldStandard . . . . . . . . 11, 12, 13
    Wissenschaft . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
    Sudoku . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
    Rätsel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
    WebStandard . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
    Kino . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
    Theaterwoche . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
    TV, Switchlist . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
    Gastkommentare . . . . . . . . . . 27
    STANDARDS
    ZITAT DES TAGES
    „Wir brauchen Modernität
    im Haus. Aus diesem Grund
    will ich es durch neue
    Personen dynamisieren.“
    Bildungsminister Heinz Faßmann zur Kritik
    am Umbau der Führung in seinem Ressort
    Seite 5, Kommentar Seite 28
    HEUTE
    Kopf des Tages
    Masako Owada ist Japans neue
    Kaiserin. Die Ehefrau von Kaiser
    Naruhito war einst eine aufstre-
    bende Diplomatin und leidet auch
    psychisch unter den Einengungen
    des strengen Hofstaats. Seite 28
    Westen: Süden: Osten:
    11 bis 22°
    7 bis 20°
    5 bis 21°
    6 bis 17°
    Norden:
    Wetter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
    Salzburg ist Cupsieger
    Mit einem 2:0 gegen Rapid hat
    Red Bull Salzburg im Klagenfurter
    Wörthersee-Stadion den ÖFB-Cup
    gewonnen. Bei einem Böllerwurf
    beim Rapid-Fanmarsch war zuvor
    ein Mensch verletzt worden. S. 10
    US-Regierung droht
    mit Militärintervention
    in Venezuela
    Caracas – Einen Tag nach seinem
    Beginn schien der Versuch der
    venezolanischen Opposition, die
    Staatsgewalt in die Hände zu neh-
    men, am Mittwoch festzufahren.
    Zwar rief Nationalversammlungs-
    chef Juan Guaidó, den viele west-
    liche Staaten als Präsident Vene-
    zuelas anerkannt haben, zu neuen
    Großprotesten auf – über kleine
    Gruppen hinaus schienen die Si-
    cherheitskräfte aber nicht seinem
    Aufruf zu folgen, dem linksautori-
    tären Präsidenten Nicolás Maduro
    die Gefolgschaft zu verweigern.
    Auch Maduro rief für Mittwoch zu
    Demonstrationen auf, neue Stra-
    ßenschlachten wurden befürch-
    tet. US-Außenminister Mike Pom-
    peo betonte, eine US-Militäraktion
    gegen Maduro sei „möglich“. (red)
    Seite 7, Kommentar Seite 28
    Freundschaft und Feindschaft an ihrem ersten ersten Mai
    Beim traditionellen Maiaufmarsch der SPÖ trat erst-
    mals Pamela Rendi-Wagner als Bundesparteichefin
    auf. Sie übte auf dem Wiener Rathausplatz vor rund
    12.000 Besuchern scharfe Kritik an der Bundesregie-
    rung und forderte Vizekanzler Heinz-Christian Stra-
    che (FPÖ) angesichts neuer „Einzelfälle“ zum Rück-
    tritt auf. Die Regierung wiederum nutzte den Tag der
    Arbeit für einen Feiertagsministerrat, bei dem Bun-
    deskanzler Sebastian Kurz (ÖVP) noch einmal die
    jüngste Steuerreform lobte. Die FPÖ feierte den 1. Mai
    wie immer auf dem Linzer Urfahraner Markt, wo Stra-
    che nicht mit Kritik an der SPÖ sparte. Seite 4
    Foto: Robert Newald

    View full-size slide

  7. Not America’s Page One
    SKANDAL
    RAPOR
    ABD Uluslararası Dini Özgürlükler Komisyonu, FETÖ’yü “dini baskıya
    uğrayan mağdur” olarak tanımladı. Ankara’dan sert tepki geldi.
    nRaporu ‘gerçeklik ve tarafsızlıktan
    uzak’ sözleriyle değerlendiren
    Cumhurbaşkanlığı Sözcüsü İbra-
    him Kalın, ‘Terör örgütü olduğu
    hukuken ispatlanmış FETÖ ma-
    sumlaştırmaya çalışılıyor. Bu ra-
    por ABD’nin terörle mücadele ko-
    nusundaki körlük ve tarafgirliği-
    nin açık bir göstergesidir” dedi.
    nDışişleri Bakanlığı’nın açıklama-
    sında da, ‘FETÖ mensuplarına
    ilişkin değerlendirmeler, raporun
    hangi şer odaklarının etkisiyle ka-
    leme alındığını açıkça ortaya koy-
    maktadır. FETÖ’ye ilişkin nitelen-
    dirmeler teröre bilerek göz yum-
    mak anlamına gelmektedir’ ifade-
    lerine yer verildi. ►9
    PERŞEMBE, 2 MAYIs 2019 1.5 TL
    Aktaş, Mudanya’yı rahatlatmak
    için iskele değişikliğini inceliyor
    Büyükşehir Belediye Başkanı Alinur
    Aktaş, seçim sonrası değerlendirmeleri ve
    cumhurbaşkanı ile görüşmeleri hakkında
    bilgi verirken, “BUDO’yu İDO iskelesine
    taşıyıp Mudanya’yı rahatlatmayı
    düşündüğünü” söyledi.
    Konuya iyi niyetli ve çözüm için
    yaklaşan Başkan Aktaş, bir sorunu
    çözerken başka soruna yol aç-
    mamak için de “Burgaz’da,
    yerinde gözlem” istedi…
    AHMET EMİN YILMAZ ►11
    www.olay.com.tr
    13
    DÜnYA
    Yıldırım’dan
    sokak
    hayvanlarına
    10 ton mama
    YAşAM 2 BURSA’DA
    HAVA
    10O
    Gece
    19O
    GünDüz
    İnegöl’de
    başıboş
    köpekler
    hastanelik etti
    3. SAYFA
    Julian Assange’a 50 hafta hapis
    Ekvador’un Londra Büyükelçiliği’nde geçir-
    diği 7 yılın ardından polise teslim edilen Wi-
    kiLeaks’in kurucusu Julian Assange, 50 haf-
    ta hapse mahkûm edildi.
    1 MAYIS COŞKUSU
    Emek ve Dayanışma
    Günü tüm yurtta çeşitli
    etkinliklerle kutlandı.
    BAYrAM YoLUNDA
    KAHrEDEN KAzA
    nElbistan’dan, 1 Mayıs kutlamalarına katılmak üzere
    Şanlıurfa’ya giden işçileri taşıyan midibüs devrildi. Ka-
    zada 5 işçi öldü, 13 kişi yaralandı. Kazanın lastiği pat-
    layan bir otomobilin minibüse çarpmasıyla yaşandığı
    açıklandı. Hak-İş ve Memur-Sen’in 1 Mayıs kutlamaları
    kaza nedeniyle yarıda kesilerek iptal edildi. ►10
    Mehmetçiğe süper lazer gÜNde14BiN
    kiŞiye ifTar
    Büyükşehir
    Belediyesi,
    ramazanda
    şehrin 8
    farklı nokta-
    sında iftar
    sofrası ku-
    racak, ren-
    kli etkinlik-
    ler düzenle-
    yecek.
    nBüyükşehir Belediye Başkanı Alinur Aktaş, ra-
    mazanda dolu dolu bir program hazırladıkla-
    rını söyledi. Merinos AKKM’de ay boyunca or-
    taoyunu, meddah, ilahiler, çocuk tiyatrosu,
    masal kahramanları ve yarışmalar olacak.
    8 BÖLGEDE soFrALAr KUrULACAK
    n Başkan Aktaş, “Fomara, Görükle, Alemdar,
    Emirsultan, Mehmet Akif Ersoy Mahallesi, Yıl-
    dırım Çınarönü, Gürsu Meydanı ve İnegöl ol-
    mak üzere 8 noktada her gün 14 bin kişilik iftar
    sofraları kuracağız’ dedi. ááDErYA DEMİr ►4
    maduro
    darBeyi
    BaSTırdı
    Venezuela Devlet Başka-
    nı Maduro, askeri darbe
    ve halk ayaklanmasına
    izin vermedi. ABD Dışiş-
    leri Bakanı Pompeo yeni
    tehditler savurdu.
    nGuaido’yu destekleyen askerleri ‘planları ba-
    şarısız olan küçük bir grup’ olarak tanımla-
    yan Maduro, yaşananların cezasız kalmaya-
    cağını açıkladı. Gerekmesi durumunda Ve-
    nezuela’ya askeri operasyon için hazır ol-
    duklarını belirten Pompeo, ‘Böyle bir hare-
    kat mümkün ve yapabiliriz’ dedi. ►11
    BaŞka iTTifaka
    ihTiyaç yok
    nCumhur İttifakı’nın Türk
    milletinin takdir ve ufuk
    bayrağı olduğunu söyle-
    yen MHP lideri Devlet
    Bahçeli, ‘31 Mart seçim-
    leri öncesi “Kürdistan’da
    kazanacağız, batıda AK
    Parti ile MHP’ye kaybet-
    tireceğiz” diyen bölücü-
    lerle Türkiye İttifakı na-
    sıl sağlanacaktır?’ ifade-
    sini kullandı. ►8
    Teleferiğe
    1 ay
    bakım
    molası
    Bursa Cumhuriyet
    Başsavcısı Uğurhan
    Kuş ve Adalet Komis-
    yonu Başkanı Ali Rıza
    Bir, Osmangazi Beledi-
    ye Başkanı Mustafa
    Dündar’a hayırlı olsun
    ziyaretinde bulundu.
    nCHP İl Başkanı Hüseyin Akkuş ve be-
    raberindeki heyet, Genel Başkan Ke-
    mal Kılıçdaroğlu’na geçmiş olsun zi-
    yareti gerçekleştirdi. Gemlik Belediye
    Başkanı Mehmet Uğur Sertaslan zi-
    yaret sırasında Kılıçdaroğlu’na Gem-
    lik’in anahtarını takdim etti. ►12
    sigara ve telefona
    şAnS TOpu
    7
    +
    17
    29
    28 7
    26
    SAYISAL LOTO
    33
    25
    20
    6 11 18
    2 lira
    Ramazan hazırlığını
    tamamlayan BESAŞ
    400 gram pidenin fi-
    yatını 2 lira olarak be-
    lirledi. Başkan Aktaş,
    “Piyasada satılacak
    pidenin kilogram fi-
    yatı 8.33 liraya gelir-
    ken, BESAŞ’ta kilo-
    gram fiyatı 5 lira ola-
    cak” dedi. ►12
    Mevlana
    belgeseli
    çekecek
    nÜnlü şarkıcı Beyonce,
    Mevlana’nın hayatını anla-
    tan bir belgesel çekmeye
    karar verdi. Belgesel için
    60 milyon dolar ayıran Be-
    yonce, geçen yıl dünyaya
    gelen ikizlerine Mevla-
    na’nın ismi olan Rumi ve
    Sir adını vermişti.
    BeSaŞ pideSi
    BeSaŞ pideSi
    nİstanbul’da kutlamaların ad-
    resi bu yıl Bakırköy olurken,
    Taksim’e çıkmak isteyenlere
    izin verilmedi. 127 kişi gözaltı-
    na alındı. İzmir ve Kocaeli’nde
    de binlerce emekçi meydanla-
    rı doldurdu.
    nBursa’da 1 Mayıs, davul, zur-
    na ve tulumla halaylar ve slo-
    ganlar eşliğinde kutlandı. Yü-
    rüyüşe 20 bin civarında katı-
    lım olurken, Kent Meyda-
    nı’nda 5 bin kişi toplandı. Yak-
    laşık 3 bin polis görev yaptı.
    áá AYŞEGÜL GÜrAL AKTÜrK ►5
    5 ölü
    nTüm cep telefonları için
    yüzde 25 olan ÖTV oranı,
    640 liranın üzerinde yüzde
    40, 1500 liranın üzerinde
    yüzde 50 olarak yeniden
    belirlendi. Sigarada asgari
    maktu vergi tutarı 0,2679
    lira oldu. ►6
    Başsavcı
    Kuş’tan
    Dündar’a
    ziyaret
    nMisafirlerine teşekkür
    eden Başkan Dündar, yü-
    rütülen çalışmalar hakkın-
    da bilgi verdi. Dündar,
    Başsavcı Kuş ve Adalet Ko-
    misyonu Başkanı Bir’e be-
    lediye binasının giriş ka-
    tında maketi sergilenen
    Osmangazi Meydan Proje-
    si’ni anlattı. ►12
    ‘TARAFGİRLİK GÖSTERGESİ...’
    ‘TERÖRE GÖZ YUMULUYOR...’
    GEMLİK’İN ANAHTArI
    KILIÇDAroĞLU’NDA
    nCumhurbaşkanı Recep Tayyip Erdo-
    ğan ile ABD Başkanı Donald Trump
    arasında geçtiğimiz gün yapılan tele-
    fon görüşmesinde, S-400’ler ve Suri-
    ye’nin kuzeyindeki son durumun
    yanı sıra Trump’ın Türkiye ziyareti-
    nin de ele alındığı kaydediliyor. ►11
    nTÜBİTAK, milli piyade tüfeği MPT 76’ya monte edilebilen
    milli lazer silahı geliştirdi. Sanayi ve Teknoloji Bakanı Mustafa
    Varank, ‘Bu, patlayan veya ateşli bir silah değil. Elektriği lazer
    ışığına çeviriyor. 20 kilowat güç seviyesinde bir geminin gü-
    vertesindeki çeliği
    delebili-
    yor’’ de-
    di. ►9
    nKent merkezi ile Uludağ arasında al-
    ternatif ulaşım sağlayan teleferik
    seferlerinin bir bölümüne bakım ça-
    lışmaları nedeniyle bir ay ara veril-
    di. 2 Mayıs-3 Haziran tarihleri ara-
    sında Teferrüç-Sarıalan arasındaki
    hatlarda bakım yapılacak. ►12
    Bursaspor kesenin
    ağzını açıyor
    nAkhisar maçı sonrası demoralize olan
    oyuncuların moralini yerine getirmek
    için çırpınan Teknik Direktör Mesut Bak-
    kal’ın ardından bir hamle de yönetimden
    geldi. Daha önce maç başı primini 50 bin
    TL’ye çıkaran yönetim, takım ligde kalır-
    sa, oyunculara 300-350 bin lira arası
    prim dağıtmayı planlıyor. ►spor
    Trump
    geliyor
    ABD Başkanı Donald Trump’ın
    temmuz ayı içinde Türkiye’ye bir
    ziyaret gerçekleştireceği belirtildi.
    Mesut Bakkal
    MHP
    lideri
    Bahçeli
    ÖTV zammı
    TIPSA EXPRESSEN
    71717
    • Skicka nyhetsbilder via MMS
    • Skicka nyhetstips via SMS
    A NN ON S
    ANN-CHARLOTTE MARTEUS:
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    Breaking news at chicagotribune.com
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    171st year No. 122 © Chicago Tribune
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    Tom Skilling’s forecast High 55 Low 43
    Trump’s behavior. The dis-
    pute is certain to persist, as
    Democrats push to give
    Mueller a chance to answer
    Barr’s testimony with his
    own later this month.
    Barr separately informed
    the House Judiciary Com-
    mittee that he would not
    appear for its scheduled
    hearing Thursday because
    ofthepanel’sinsistencethat
    he be questioned by com-
    mittee lawyers as well as
    lawmakers. That refusal
    sets the stage for Barr to
    possibly be held in con-
    tempt of Congress.
    At Wednesday’s Senate
    WASHINGTON — Pri-
    vate tensions between Jus-
    tice Department leaders
    and special counsel Robert
    Mueller’s team broke into
    public view Wednesday as
    Attorney General William
    Barr pushed back at the
    special counsel’s “snitty”
    complaints over his han-
    dling of the Trump-Russia
    investigation report.
    Testifying for the first
    time since releasing
    Mueller’s report, Barr faced
    sharp questioning from
    Senate Democrats who ac-
    cused him of making mis-
    leading comments and
    seeming at times to be
    President Donald Trump’s
    protector as much as the
    country’s top law enforce-
    ment official.
    The rift fueled allega-
    tions that Barr has spun
    Mueller’s findings in
    Trump’s favor and under-
    stated the gravity of
    Judiciary Committee ses-
    sion, Barr said he had been
    surprised Mueller did not
    reach a conclusion on
    whetherTrumphadtriedto
    obstruct justice, and that he
    hadfeltcompelledtostepin
    with his own judgment that
    the president had commit-
    ted no crime.
    “I’m not really sure of his
    reasoning,” Barr said of
    Mueller’s obstruction anal-
    ysis, which neither accused
    the president of a crime nor
    exonerated him. If Mueller
    felt he shouldn’t make a
    Senate Dems accuse Barr of lying
    AG calls Mueller’s
    letter over report’s
    handling ‘a bit snitty’
    By Eric Tucker and
    Mary Clare Jalonick
    Associated Press
    Attorney General William Barr, who testified to senators,
    refuses to do so Thursday before a House committee.
    WIN MCNAMEE/GETTY
    Turn to Barr, Page 13
    Democrats in the Illinois
    Senate used their super-
    majority to push forward
    legislation Wednesday
    paving the way for a gradu-
    ated-ratestateincometax—
    DemocraticGov.J.B.Pritzk-
    er’s top legislative priority
    — but the plan faces an
    uncertain future in the
    House.
    With a 40-19 straight
    party-line vote, Senate
    Democrats exceeded the
    three-fifths majority re-
    quired to approve a pro-
    posed amendment that
    would eliminate the Illinois
    Constitution’s flat tax re-
    quirement and allow for a
    structure that charges
    higher rates on higher in-
    comes. That measure must
    be approved by the same
    margin in the Democrat-
    controlled House and then
    would go before voters in
    the November 2020 elec-
    tion.
    Again without any Re-
    publican votes, Senate
    Democrats passed a pack-
    age of bills that would take
    effect only if voters approve
    the constitutional amend-
    ment. The first establishes a
    new graduated rate struc-
    ture that would bring in an
    estimated $3.3 billion in
    newstaterevenuebyraising
    taxes on people earning
    more than $250,000 a year
    while giving a modest break
    to the other 97 percent of
    taxpayers.
    The other bills — aimed
    at winning over reluctant
    Democrats and appeasing
    angry taxpayers — would
    freeze school district prop-
    erty tax rates if the state
    meets its education funding
    obligations and eliminate
    the estate tax, a long-held
    Republican priority. While
    Democrats were united in
    support of the proposed
    Ill. Senate
    passes
    Pritzker’s
    tax plan
    Democrats help
    move proposal
    over to House
    By Dan Petrella
    Chicago Tribune
    Turn to Tax, Page 9
    As rain soaked northern Illinois, flood warnings hit Chicago-area rivers on Wednesday morning and residents might have to deal with an-
    other bout of flash flooding Thursday. The Des Plaines River was at or close to flood levels Wednesday at Des Plaines and Riverside, while
    the DuPage River at Plainfield and the Fox River in McHenry and Kane counties were flooding. Above, Natalie Kaciulis takes pictures with
    her son Nicholas, 2, as recent heavy rains swell the DuPage River at the Naperville Riverwalk on Wednesday. Chicagoland, Page 4
    ZBIGNIEW BZDAK/CHICAGO TRIBUNE
    Chicago area braces for flooding
    A new study that shows
    adolescentsareattempting
    suicide by overdose at in-
    creasing rates is further
    evidence that the perva-
    sive public health problem
    needs more conversation
    and money, experts say.
    In the report, published
    WednesdayinTheJournal
    of Pediatrics, researchers
    at Nationwide Children’s
    Hospital in Columbus,
    Ohio, and the Central Ohio
    PoisonCenterfoundmedi-
    cation overdose suicide at-
    tempts have more than
    doubled since 2000, and
    more than tripled for girls.
    “I think this all adds up
    to an opportunity to edu-
    cate and build awareness
    and find out what solu-
    tionsareoutthereforthis,”
    said John Ackerman, sui-
    cide prevention coordina-
    tor and clinical psycholo-
    gist at Nationwide Chil-
    dren’s Hospital and one of
    the authors of the new
    study. “We have so many
    opportunities across our
    system to do better. This
    shouldbeacalltomobilize
    resources.”
    The stakes are high.
    Joanne Meyers, of North-
    field, knows firsthand —
    her daughter Elyssa died
    by suicide at age 16 in
    2004. In 2006, Meyers
    formed Elyssa’s Mission, a
    Northbrook-based non-
    Jodie Segal, director of education with Elyssa's Mission, leads a suicide awareness
    workshop with sixth- and seventh-graders at Bannockburn School last month.
    STACEY WESCOTT/CHICAGO TRIBUNE
    ‘THIS SHOULD BE A CALL
    TO MOBILIZE RESOURCES’
    Suicide bids by overdose on rise in young people
    By Kate Thayer
    Chicago Tribune
    Turn to Suicide, Page 9
    A man who attempted
    to detonate a 1,000-pound
    car bomb outside a
    crowded Loop bar in 2012
    apologized Wednesday to
    his family, the judge and
    the United States for what
    he called a stupid mistake
    when he was a naive teen
    “trying to make friends.”
    “At the time I
    thought it was too
    late to turn back,”
    Adel Daoud,
    dressed in an or-
    ange jail jumpsuit
    and shackled at
    the ankles, told
    U.S. District Judge
    Sharon Johnson
    Coleman about the night
    he pressed the detonator
    on the bomb, all part of a
    ruse by the FBI. “Some-
    times Ilaughat mystupid-
    ity. Was that really me?”
    Reading rapidly from
    written remarks, Daoud,
    25, said he’s a different
    person now. In the nearly
    seven years since his ar-
    rest, Daoud said he real-
    ized he was “crazy for God
    knows how long” but has
    found clarity with treat-
    ment and medication
    while in jail. He has also
    come to realize that his
    beliefs were terribly mis-
    guided on what the Islam-
    ic faith teaches about vi-
    olence.
    “I was naive, gullible
    and confused,” he said
    about his life in 2012. “I
    thought jihad could only
    mean war.”
    Unlike previous court
    appearances when Daoud
    rambled incoherently
    about Freemasons and liz-
    ard people, his remarks
    Wednesdaywerelucid,his
    voice deeper and steadier.
    He ended by ask-
    ing for leniency.
    “Please don’t
    make my sentence
    a payback for
    events or to people
    around the world
    that have nothing
    to do with me,” he
    said. “I’m sorry for
    taking the court’s time, for
    making my parents cry, for
    making a bad name for the
    Muslim community, and
    I’m sorry to the United
    States of America. God
    bless you.”
    The three-day sentenc-
    ing hearing has punctuat-
    ed what has been one of
    the strangest and longest-
    running terrorism cases in
    Chicago history.
    Coleman won’t impose
    Local terror plot
    suspect: ‘I laugh
    at my stupidity’
    Hillside man faces
    sentencing in plan
    to blast Loop bar
    By Jason Meisner
    Chicago Tribune
    Daoud
    Turn to Plot, Page 8
    The developer proposing
    skyscrapers on a platform
    over train tracks near Sol-
    dier Field seeks state funds
    for a $3.8 billion transit
    center. Ryan Ori in Business
    Developer seeks
    state funds for
    transit center
    White Sox shortstop Tim
    Anderson didn’t invent bat
    flipping or home run cele-
    brations, but in his mind,
    it’s up to him to start a
    revolution. Chicago Sports
    Sox’s Anderson:
    ‘They don’t want
    me to have fun’

    View full-size slide

  21. America’s Page One
    See the current weather
    and forecast on
    www.thejournal-news.net
    Hillsboro, IL 62049 Volume 167, No. 100 Thursday, May 2, 2019
    The Newspaper of Record For Montgomery County, Illinois
    20 Pages
    $1
    PHONE 217-532-3933 [email protected] [email protected] www.thejournal-news.net LITCHFIELD 217-324-6604
    Weather Report
    Hi Lo Prec.
    April 29 71 50 .01
    April 30 73 54 1.40
    May 1 75 61 .32
    Index
    Auction .........................5B
    Classifieds ...................4B
    Family .......................... 4A
    TV Listings ................... 3B
    Obituaries .................... 2A
    Out & About ..................8A
    Sports ...........................1B
    Salute!
    Mercenaries Play
    In Hillsboro
    To Honor Twitty . . . See Sports
    The Ariston Cafe in Litchfield
    will celebrate the history of Route
    66 with a ceremony to relight the
    vintage neon signs and neon win-
    dow accents on Saturday, May 4.
    Celebrating 95 years on Route
    66, as the oldest continuously op-
    erating restaurant, neon will once
    again welcome travelers on their
    journey from Chicago to Santa
    Monica.
    The historic cafe will host a
    viewing beginning at 7 p.m. The
    program will begin as dusk nears,
    and the official relighting will take
    place between 8 and 8:15 p.m.
    Cruise in with a classic car, and
    while waiting for the perfect time
    to flip the switch, groove to music
    from the 1950s and 1960s and
    mingle with other Route 66 fans.
    As part of the festivities, the
    Litchfield Museum and Route 66
    Welcome Center across the street
    will be open for extended hours
    The landmark event has been
    made possible through the part-
    nership of Nick and Demi Adam,
    former owners of the Ariston Cafe,
    Will and Michele Law, and Marty
    and Kara Steffens, current own-
    ers of the Ariston Cafe, the Neon
    Heritage Preservation Committee
    from the Route 66 Association of
    Missouri, and the Route 66 Cor-
    ridor Preservation Program from
    the National Park Service.
    For more information contact
    the Ariston Cafe at 217-324-2023
    or check out VisitLitchfield.com.
    Ariston Cafe Honors History
    With Vintage Sign Relighting
    The suspect who had been
    wanted for allegedly breaking into
    parked cars in downtown Hillsboro
    has been arrested, according to Hill-
    sboro Police Chief Randy Leetham.
    Lamont "Chance" Alberty, 19,
    of Hillsboro, was arrested after
    he called the Montgomery County
    Sheriff's Office to turn himself in,
    as well as more stolen items. He
    has been charged with residential
    burglary and burglary to motor
    vehicles.
    According to Leetham, the crime
    was reported to police Thursday
    morning, April 24. Police identified
    the suspect using video surveillance
    images captured by downtown
    businesses.
    "I want to thank the sheriff's
    office and Litchfield police for their
    assistance in helping locate the
    suspect," Leetham said, "and the
    diligent efforts of the Hillsboro
    Police Department investigating
    officers."
    Teen Suspect Arrested For
    Downtown Vehicle Break-In
    Wild Times Exotics Zoo Director Samantha Wendling interacts with a three-year-old ring-tailed lemur
    named King Julian, as local children watch and pet its long tail. Journal-News/Bethany Martin
    Zion Hosts Flyer Fest Fundraiser For PTL
    Many fun, interactive games
    could be found in every corner
    of Zion Lutheran School for the
    fifth annual Flyer Fest fundraiser
    Saturday, April 27.
    This year's event featured car-
    nival games and prizes, inflatables,
    a cake walk, face painting, Bingo,
    a free petting zoo by Wild Exotics
    of Springfield, lunch and a silent
    auction. Games included leap frog,
    drop zone, a noodle throw, spin for
    a toy, balloon pop, beat the buzzer,
    stop and throw and pet races.
    As part of the petting zoo, chil-
    dren had the opportunity to inter-
    act with a large bunny, chinchilla,
    tarantula, skinny pig, ring-tailed
    lemur, blue tongue skink and two
    snakes.
    Continued on page 12A
    Hillsboro FCCLA Students
    Learn From Entrepreneurs
    Seven young ladies will be competing for the title of Old Settlers Queen this summer, and they were introduced
    at the kick-off event, held Tuesday, April 30, at the Challacombe House in Hillsboro. Pictured above, in front, from
    the left are Caitlyn Howard, Erin Moore, Morgan Schaake, 2018 Old Settlers Queen Kelly Jansen, Malorie Scurlock,
    Brianna Stephens and Josie Havens. In back are Charlie Page of the Hillsboro Masonic Lodge, Bill Clinard of the
    Hillsboro Lions Club, Melanie Sherer of Imagine Hillsboro, Blanche Martin of Gold Mine Gaming, Steve Cullison of the Hillsboro Rotary Club,
    Virgil Seamon of the Hillsboro Moose Lodge and Miranda Lovett and Lisa Casterline of CTI. The inset photo is queen candidate Kassie
    Dunaway. Photo courtesy of Ken Meade Studio
    Old Settlers Association Introduces Queen Candidates
    The Hillsboro Old Settlers As-
    sociation held its annual Queen's
    Kickoff on Tuesday evening, April
    30, at the Challacombe House in
    Hillsboro.
    Seven young ladies will be
    competing this summer for the
    title of 2019 Old Settlers Queen.
    The winner will be crowned dur-
    ing this year's celebration on
    Wednesday, Aug. 8, in downtown
    Hillsboro. Reigning Queen Kelly
    Jansen will pass on her crown to
    this year's winner.
    Refreshments for the evening
    included hors d'oeuvres and
    desserts, catered by Milanos'
    Catering. During the kickoff,
    each queen candidate had a
    chance to introduce herself and
    her sponsor.
    This year's candidates include
    Caitlyn Howard, sponsored by
    the Hillsboro Masonic Lodge;
    Josie Havens, sponsored by CTI;
    Brianna Stephens, sponsored
    by the Hillsboro Moose Lodge;
    Kassie Dunaway, sponsored by
    Gold Mine Gaming; Morgan
    Schaake, sponsored by Imagine
    Hillsboro; Erin Moore, sponsored
    by the Hillsboro Lions Club; and
    Malorie Scurlock, sponsored by
    the Hillsboro Rotary Club.
    During the kick-off event, sev-
    eral former Old Settlers queens
    talked about some of their favor-
    ite memories from the contest
    and offered helpful tips to this
    year's contestants.
    After introductions, the queen
    candidates had a chance to make
    a few raffle ticket sales. Ticket
    prices are $1 each, and prizes
    will be awarded immediately
    following the queen coronation.
    Prizes this year are $750 for the
    grand prize, $500 for first prize
    and $250 for second prize.
    Funds raised from this contest
    are the principle support for Old
    Settlers Days each year.
    Committee members selected
    this year's parade theme as "The
    World Through My Eyes," which
    will be for both the Kiddie Parade
    and the Big Parade on Thursday,
    Aug. 8.
    This year's entertainment
    will be a local country group,
    Ace Oxygen and the Ozones on
    Wednesday evening and Silver
    Bullet - A Tribute to Bob Seger
    on Thursday evening.
    Martin Leaves His Mark On Raymond
    From 1975 to 2017, Joe and Vonnie Martin served the village of
    Raymond together, as trustee and village clerk until Vonnie's retirement
    from the clerk's position two years ago. Monday, May 6, will be Joe's
    final Raymond village board meeting, almost 50 years to the day that
    he started as a trustee in May of 1969. Journal-News Photo
    by Kyle Herschelman
    For more than 80 years, dozens
    of citizens have served the village
    of Raymond in some capacity or
    another, whether it be as a clerk,
    a treasurer, a trustee or a mayor.
    But throughout those eight-plus
    decades, there has been one con-
    stant, the last name Martin, at
    least until this Monday's meeting
    of the village board.
    The meeting on May 6 will be
    the final board meeting for trustee
    Joe Martin, who decided not to
    run for re-election after serving
    the village for more than 50 years,
    following in the footsteps of his
    father Bert, who was village clerk
    for 40 years before passing away
    in 1974.
    "My dad and mom used to live
    around the corner. So I'd pick up
    dad and we'd go to the town board
    meeting, then we'd go across to one
    of the taverns and have a beer af-
    terwards." Martin said. "I was just
    interested in being involved with
    the town and helping the guys."
    Martin was first elected to the
    village board in May of 1959, but
    has also served Raymond as mayor
    for one term and clerk, which led
    to another member of the Martin
    family becoming involved in local
    government.
    "I told Denny (Held) that I
    would be the clerk, temporarily,
    because I had helped mom and
    dad," said Martin. "But it wasn't
    long after that I started working
    on her."
    "Her" is Vonnie Martin, Joe's
    wife, who took over for him as the
    village clerk and remained there
    until retiring in May of 2017 after
    42 years.
    Continued on page 12A
    Students in the Family, Ca-
    reer and Community Leaders
    of America (FCCLA) chapter at
    Hillsboro High School learned
    from local entrepreneurs after
    school on Tuesday, April 30.
    Members had a question-and-
    answer session with child care
    expert and HCCDC founder Sheri
    Reynolds, Red Rooster Inn revital-
    izer Kendra Wright, high school
    senior and CEO entrepreneur
    Logan Altenberger, Atlas 46 CEO
    Brian Carver and his assistant
    Laura Marshall, and Montgomery
    County Growth Initiative leader
    Bob Buda.
    Continued on page 12A
    See Page 7A

    View full-size slide

  22. America’s Page One
    MESSENGER-INQUIRER
    ஽ Vol. 137, No. 8 OWENSBORO • SUNDAY, JANUARY 8, 2012 • www.messenger-inquirer.com $1.75
    RETURN TO FORM
    Recovering from injury, Jones scores 20 as UK wins/B1
    BUSINESS: Phill’s
    Custom Cabinets sells
    Cabinotch patent/D1
    Owensboro
    Mayor Ron
    Payne likes to
    say that “Owensboro
    is on the move,” and
    he often follows it by
    saying that no other
    city in Kentucky has
    as much going on as
    Owensboro.
    Last week, in his annual “State
    of the City” address, Payne made
    that case again, with details
    supporting the claim. He seized
    on the fact that 58 public and
    private projects are currently
    under way in the community
    with a total value of $759 million,
    all of which he
    said contribute
    to a strong local
    economy.
    Larry Boswell
    doesn’t doubt it. “I’ve
    lived here all my
    life, and it’s been a
    long time coming,”
    Boswell said.
    Boswell is
    business manager of the
    386-member Owensboro
    Local 1701 of the International
    Brotherhood of Electrical
    Workers union. These days,
    according to Bowell, it’s full
    employment time for the local,
    with more than 200 members
    working on the new Owensboro
    Medical Health System hospital
    between Pleasant
    Valley Road and
    Daniels Lane off U.S.
    60 East.
    The hospital and
    a long list of other
    projects outlined
    by Payne keep
    the local’s other
    electricians working
    steadily, with
    journeymen earning the top rate
    of $29.02 a hour, plus benefits,
    Boswell said.
    “It’s been very beneficial
    to us,” Boswell said. “All our
    members are working. It’s
    definitely a boost compared to
    the two years prior (to 2010).
    We started seeing the increase
    toward the end of 2010. 2012
    is projected to be great. ... It’s
    really looking good for any
    electrical contractor, union or
    nonunion.”
    Some of the projects
    on Payne’s list are close to
    completion, such as the Kentucky
    National Guard Readiness
    Center, the new state office
    building and the downtown river
    wall project. But others, including
    the downtown convention center
    and Hampton Inn & Suites hotel,
    are set to begin this spring.
    Boswell said spin-off projects
    related to the hospital and
    downtown projects hold potential
    for more construction jobs.
    “It looks like several years of
    work,” he said.
    For his fourth “State of the
    City” speech Thursday at the
    Greater Owensboro Chamber
    of Commerce’s Rooster Booster
    breakfast, Payne delivered a
    glowing report on the city’s
    health, shining a light on the size
    of the surplus in the city’s general
    fund and moderate-to-low tax
    rates compared to 13 other first-
    and second-class cities. He spent
    the bulk of his time presenting
    the list of ongoing, just finished
    or soon-to-start projects and
    the city’s lower-than-average
    unemployment rate. While the
    national unemployment rate is
    SEE BLOCKS/PAGE A2
    BUILDING BLOCKS
    BY STEVE VIED
    MESSENGER INQUIRER
    SUNDAY SERIES
    Gary Emord-Netzley, Messenger-Inquirer [email protected] 691-7318
    Salsman Brothers Inc. employees, Jewell Galloway of Madisonville, left, and C.J. Brummett of Dawson Springs, cover a section of concrete wall on the second of two bridges on Ken-
    tucky 144 on Thursday afternoon. The bridge work is part of the rst phase of the U.S. 60 Bypass Extension project under way east of Owensboro. The Bypass Extension is one of 58
    public and private projects currently under way in the community with a total value of $759 million.
    Projects boosting employment, economic growth
    The total
    economic impact,
    according to
    Mayor Ron Payne,
    will be $1.3
    billion.
    INDEX
    Goodfellows drive tops
    $121,000/C1
    Printed
    with
    soy ink
    Agriculture/D5
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    Television/G4-5
    2012 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION
    Owensboro-Daviess County
    Regional Airport had another
    record-breaking year in 2011.
    And officials there are hoping
    to set yet another record for pas-
    sengers in 2012.
    In 2010, the airport boarded
    slightly more than 16,000 passen-
    gers, primarily on Allegiant Air
    flights to Orlando, Fla.
    Last year, boardings continued
    to climb to 16,849.
    And Ray Assmar, board chair-
    man, says, “We should bounce
    close to 20,000 this year.”
    The 2011 numbers might have
    been closer to 20,000, but Alle-
    giant suspended flights to Orlando
    for most of August and September,
    which are typically slow months
    for travel to Florida.
    The airline did the same thing
    in 2009.
    The 2010 numbers were the
    most passengers the airport had
    seen in a single year since com-
    mercial service began here in
    1951 with Eastern Airlines.
    SEE AIRPORT/PAGE A2
    Airport boardings
    keep breaking records
    BY KEITH LAWRENCE
    MESSENGER INQUIRER
    MANCHESTER, N.H. — Mitt
    Romney brushed aside rivals’ criti-
    cism Saturday night in the open-
    ing round of a weekend debate
    doubleheader that left his Repub-
    lican presidential campaign chal-
    lengers squabbling among them-
    selves and unable to knock the
    front-runner off stride.
    Three days before the first in-
    the-nation New Hampshire pri-
    mary, Romney largely ignored
    his fellow Republicans and turned
    instead on President Barack
    SEE DEBATE/PAGE A2
    Romney brushes
    o debate barbs
    in New Hampshire
    BY STEVE PEOPLES
    ASSOCIATED PRESS
    A1

    6RXWK&HQWUDO%DQNFRP
    :KDWHYHU \RXU EDQNLQJ QHHGV
    Vol. 145, No. 122 Owensboro, Ky. • $1.49
    THURSDAY, MAY 2, 2019
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    • Derby favorite scratched
    • Mathis: By My Standards
    has area connections
    Stories, Page C1
    Derby favorite scratched
    Derby favorite scratched
    Despair & Dreams
    Just one week after a heat-
    ed exchange over Owensboro
    Health’s possible participa-
    tion in paying for a city-county
    ambulance services contract,
    the Owensboro City Commis-
    sion on Wednesday unani-
    mously approved that agree-
    ment with American Medical
    Resources (AMR) after no dis-
    cussion.
    According to City Man-
    a g e r N a t e
    Pagan, conver-
    sations regard-
    ing who will
    pay how much
    of the $150,000
    subsidy that
    contract stipu-
    lates are ongo-
    ing.
    “I think everyone wanted
    financial assistance from the
    hospital,” he said. “They’re in
    the health care business. So,
    they are the
    c o m m u n i t y ’ s
    health provid-
    er, and I think
    their mission is
    to ensure the
    health and wel-
    fare of the com-
    munity. This is
    a component
    of the health environment for
    the local community. We don’t
    know how the subsidy may or
    may not be split. Discussions
    are ongoing with the hospital,
    so how the subsidy is shared
    among the partners is still to
    be determined.”
    Still, it is up to Daviess
    Fiscal Court to approve the
    AMR contract before Yellow
    Ambulance exits the commu-
    nity next month. County com-
    missioners are set to consider
    that contract Thursday, May 2,
    afternoon.
    SEE CITY/PAGE A2
    City OKs ambulance agreement
    BY AUSTIN RAMSEY
    MESSENGER INQUIRER
    Nate
    Pagan
    Mayor
    Tom Watson
    The Catholic Diocese of
    Owensboro said in a statement
    late Wednesday afternoon that
    diocesan officials are recom-
    mending the Rev. Ed Bradley
    be permanently
    suspended from
    p u b l i c m i n i s -
    tr y following an
    investigation into
    complaints that
    Bradley had sexu-
    ally abused two
    minors.
    The diocese
    released a state-
    ment shor tly before 4 p.m.
    Neither the Most Rev. William
    Medley, bishop of the diocese of
    Owensboro, nor Diocese Direc-
    tor of Communications Tina
    Kasey could be reached for com-
    ment after the diocese issued the
    release.
    Bradley, 75, did not return
    calls for comment.
    During his career, Bradley was
    principal at Owensboro Catho-
    lic High School from 1980 to
    1985, and was interim head of
    Owensboro Catholic Schools in
    2017 to June of last year.
    Bradley was temporarily sus-
    pended on March 1 after dioc-
    esan officials received sexual
    abuse allegations that allegedly
    occurred while Bradley was prin-
    cipal at OCHS. The release says
    a second allegation was received
    a few days after news of Bradley’s
    temporary suspension was made
    public.
    That second allegation was of
    “misconduct involving a minor
    dating from 1980,” the state-
    ment says. The allegations were
    referred to the Commonwealth’s
    Attorney’s Offi ce, the statement
    said.
    Of ficer Andrew Boggess,
    public information officer for
    the Owensboro Police Depart-
    ment, said detectives investi-
    gated the first allegation and
    reported their findings to the
    SEE BRADLEY/PAGE A2
    Diocese
    recommends
    Bradley be
    permanently
    suspended
    BY JAMES MAYSE
    MESSENGER INQUIRER
    The Rev.
    Ed Bradley
    UNDER INSPECTION
    Above: Harold and Gail Hoover from Hartford look over
    used school buses in the parking lot of the Owensboro
    Sportscenter during the pre-inspection period on
    Wednesday for the annual city auction. Kurtz Auction and
    Realty will conduct the sale beginning at 10 a.m. for smaller
    items and 11 a.m. for cars and trucks on Thursday, May 2.
    Right: William Allen Jr. left, and his dad, William Allen, check
    out the line of bicycles in the parking lot of the Owensboro
    Sportscenter during the pre-inspection period on
    Wednesday for the annual city auction.
    Photos by Alan Warren, Messenger-Inquirer |
    [email protected]
    Daviess Circuit Judge Jay
    Wethington set a 2020 trial
    date on Wednesday for Mat-
    thew A. Adams, the Utica man
    charged with killing a woman
    last July at her home on Placid
    Place.
    Adams, 26, was charged
    with murder, fi rst-degree bur-
    glary, tampering with physical
    evidence and violation of an
    emergency protective order in
    the death of Erica Owen, 25.
    Owen was found dead in her
    home after officers, respond-
    ing to a possible sui-
    cide call at the home
    of one of Adams’ rela-
    tives, found Adams
    there. According to
    police, Adams told
    them he believed he
    may have killed Owen.
    Commonwealth’s
    Attorney Bruce Kuegel
    is seeking the death penalty
    against Adams. Owen had an
    emergency protective order
    against Adams at the time she
    was killed, and Adams had an
    active arrest warrant against
    him on felony charges of van-
    dalizing Owen’s home.
    Adams wasn’t served
    with the warrant until
    he was arrested on the
    murder charge.
    Wethington set
    the trial date for Oct.
    1, 2020. The trial
    is expected to last two
    weeks and includes
    fi ve days to select a jury.
    “As soon as the jury is
    selected, we’ll take testimony,”
    Wethington said.
    Wethington also set an
    SEE TRIAL/PAGE A2
    Adams’ death penalty trial set for 2020
    BY JAMES MAYSE
    MESSENGER INQUIRER
    Matthew
    A. Adams
    I n N o v e m b e r, v o t e r s
    approved the sale of alcoholic
    beverages in East Philpot pre-
    cinct, paving the way for sales at
    the Daviess County Lions Club
    Fairgrounds — and other places
    in the precinct.
    On July 9, the Lions Club will
    get its license to sell beer and
    other beverages, opening the
    door for new events — including
    concerts — at the fairgrounds.
    And on July 27, the club is
    bringing Exile, a band that start-
    ed in rock music in 1963 and
    later switched to country, to the
    fairgrounds arena for an 8 p.m.
    show.
    A beer garden will be avail-
    able at the show, Dyanne Baker,
    a member of the fair board, said
    this week.
    The arena can seat about
    10,000 people — making it the
    largest venue in Daviess County.
    “We hope we can continue
    SEE LIONS/PAGE A2
    Daviess Lions look to bring
    concerts to fairgrounds
    BY KEITH LAWRENCE
    MESSENGER INQUIRER

    View full-size slide

  23. America’s Page One
    By Johanna S. Billings
    GOULDSBORO — More
    than 150 residents attended
    a Monday night hearing
    to listen and ask questions
    about an effort to disband the
    Gouldsboro Police Depart-
    ment.
    The hearing was sched-
    uled after resident Becky
    Irwin filed a petition seek-
    ing to ask voters whether
    they want to dissolve the
    town’s police department
    and instead contract with
    the Hancock County Sher-
    iff’s Office. Because the peti-
    tion was signed by 97 resi-
    dents, four more than the 93
    required, the question will be
    on the Town Meeting ballot
    June 12.
    “I firmly believe this topic
    needs to be discussed,” said
    Irwin, who was asked to
    explain her reasons for col-
    lecting signatures. “The goal
    of the petition was to bring
    about a conversation that
    has been brewing in this
    community for some time.”
    When pressed for more
    information, she said she
    had nothing to add and
    wanted to hear presentations
    by Gouldsboro Police Chief
    Tyler Dunbar and Hancock
    County Sheriff Scott Kane.
    Dunbar said the police
    budget for the 2018-19 fis-
    cal year was about $207,000,
    which pays for two full-time
    officers and one part-time
    officer to work a total of up to
    169th Year—Issue No. 18 32 Pages, Three Sections ELLSWORTH, MAINE 04605 Thursday, May 2, 2019 $2.00
    National Nurses Week! Page 7
    Continued on Page 11
    ellsworthamerican.com
    For subscriptions,
    or to contact us,
    call 667–2576
    or fax 667–7656
    National Debt
    On Wednesday, May 1, the out-
    standing U.S. public debt was
    $22.2 trillion, an increase of $1.2
    trillion from last year’s $21.0 tril-
    lion. Each citizen’s share of the
    debt is $67,668.
    ©2019
    Ellsworth
    American Inc.
    One Printing
    House Square,
    Ellsworth, ME
    8 91759 00001 0
    Continued on Page 11
    By Cyndi Wood
    ELLSWORTH — Women: check
    your breasts and trust your gut.
    That’s the message Barbara
    Courchesne, owner of the Bud Con-
    nection, would like to impart with
    her new initiative, Bud for Boobs. For
    every reusable vase or basket that cus-
    tomers bring in, the shop will make a
    donation to the mammography schol-
    arship fund at Northern Light Maine
    Coast Hospital.
    The cause is personal for
    Courchesne, 50, who was diagnosed
    with breast cancer last year and
    recently underwent a double mastec-
    tomy and reconstructive surgery.
    “Early detection has saved my life
    certainly, so I think it’s important to
    advocate for that for other people,”
    she said last Thursday, while taking a
    break from arranging 44 table center-
    pieces for the Chefs’ Gala.
    The gala, which was held
    Saturday night at the Ramada in
    Ellsworth (Section II, Page 6), raises
    money for breast care services at
    Maine Coast, including mammogram
    scholarships for those who lack health
    insurance or have high-deductible
    plans.
    To launch Bud for Boobs,
    Courchesne donated flowers for the
    event and gave out compact mirrors
    emblazoned with a message remind-
    ing women to get their mammograms.
    The bouquets featured orange
    tulips, purple cremone, carnations
    (“in cool colors though”), spray roses
    and succulents topped off with twin-
    kle lights. Each was a little different
    and in keeping with the gala’s neigh-
    borhood block party theme.
    The gala is a great party, but it’s
    important to remember its greater
    purpose, Courchesne said.
    Last spring, a routine mammogram
    Cancer survivor raising money,
    awareness for mammograms
    ELLSWORTH AMERICAN PHOTO BY CYNDI WOOD
    Barbara Courchesne, a breast cancer
    survivor and owner of the Bud
    Connection, puts the finishing touch —
    twinkle lights — on floral arrangements
    for the Chefs’ Gala. The bouquets
    will help raise awareness for her new
    philanthropic effort, Bud for Boobs.
    Stanley Subaru
    The Smart Choice
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    Acadia Choral Society’s Spring Concert and our Local Teachers!
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    Friday, May 3, 7:00 p.m.
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    Ellsworth High School
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    YOUR
    FUTURE
    By Kate Cough
    ELLSWORTH — A bed of
    ice. A slice of lemon. A dozen
    gleaming oyster shells. And
    … thousands of fragments of
    plastic?
    No thank you, state Rep.
    Nicole Grohoski (D-Ells-
    worth) told the Committee
    on Environment and Natu-
    ral Resources at a hearing on
    April 24.
    “I generally don’t eat plas-
    tic if I can help it,” said Gro-
    hoski, citing a study by the
    Shaw Institute in Blue Hill
    that found an average of 177
    plastic fragments in oysters
    harvested in Maine, and a
    similar number in mussels.
    Grohoski was in Augusta
    to testify on a bill she is co-
    sponsoring that would elimi-
    nate single-use plastic bags
    statewide. The bill would ban
    plastic bags less than 4 mils
    (0.1 millimeter) in thick-
    ness and require retailers to
    impose a 5-cent fee on paper
    bags.
    There are some exceptions
    — dry cleaning and produce
    bags, newspaper sleeves, tire
    bags at auto parts stores —
    but for the most part, the bill
    would ban thin plastic bags at
    the point of sale. They could
    still be sold on store shelves,
    such as those for dog waste.
    Plastic bags are not the
    only — or the biggest —
    problem, Grohoski acknowl-
    edged. But they are a “signifi-
    cant concern,” she said.
    The Blue Hill study also
    made this point, noting that
    plastic bags are not necessar-
    ily the most common source
    of debris in Penobscot or
    Blue Hill bays. (Microbeads
    from beauty products and
    fragments of synthetic cloth-
    ing were likely the biggest
    contributors.)
    But Americans do use a
    lot of plastic carryout bags
    (roughly 4.13 million tons
    in 2015, according to the
    Environmental Protection
    Agency) and only around
    12 percent of those bags are
    recycled.
    Most recycling plants can’t
    handle them, and they wind
    up clogging up machinery
    (Penobscot Energy Recovery
    Co. in Orrington ran into this
    problem last year and was
    forced to upgrade its grinders
    at a cost of $800,000, accord-
    ing to Grohoski’s testimony).
    So most wind up in land-
    fills, clogging streams, caught
    in trees or in the ocean. In
    early April, a dead sperm
    whale washed ashore in Indo-
    nesia with 25 plastic bags
    (along with flip-flops, string,
    drinking cups and bottles) in
    its gut.
    And so in recent years,
    hundreds of cities and three
    states — California, Hawaii
    and New York — have sought
    to deal with the problem by
    banning thin film plastic
    bags.
    Yet results on the environ-
    mental impacts of such bans
    have been mixed. One study
    in California showed that
    consumers used 40 million
    Grohoski sponsors bill to
    ban plastic bags statewide
    Continued on Page 11
    Save over $120 with
    coupons in this issue!
    By Stephen Fay
    ELLSWORTH — A
    68-year-old St. Albans man
    driving a pickup truck
    remained in critical condi-
    tion Tuesday following a
    head-on collision Saturday
    afternoon on the Bangor
    Road near Sunrise Glass.
    Ellsworth Police Sgt.
    Shawn Willey said at the
    scene that Paul Butler’s
    Ellsworth-bound pickup
    truck evidently crossed into
    the opposite lane at around
    12:30, striking a Suburban
    traveling toward Bangor. The
    four people in the Suburban
    — two adults and their two
    children — sustained minor
    injuries and were taken to
    Northern Light Maine Coast
    Hospital.
    Samantha Wallace, 34,
    of Harrington was driving
    the Suburban. Her husband,
    Lucas, 41, was the front seat
    passenger. In the back seat
    were Hunter, 5, and Drake,
    ELLSWORTH AMERICAN PHOTO BY TERRY CARLISLE
    These two vehicles collided head-on Saturday afternoon on the Bangor Road near
    Sunrise Glass.
    Man seriously injured
    in Ellsworth Falls crash
    Continued on Page 11
    ELLSWORTH AMERICAN PHOTOS BY JOHANNA S. BILLINGS
    Gouldsboro Police Chief Tyler Dunbar (left) answers questions during a hearing
    Monday night on a citizen petition to disband the police department and contract
    with the Hancock County Sheriff’s Office. Listening during the hearing are (from left)
    petitioner Becky Irwin, resident Melinda Boumans and Town Manager Sherri Cox.
    Disbanding Gouldsboro PD
    debated; vote set for June 12
    By Jennifer Osborn
    HANCOCK — The town of
    Hancock will be asked to vote
    whether to “opt-in” to allow
    retail/commercial marijuana
    operations within its borders.
    The Hancock Town Meet-
    ing article comes on the heels
    of recently released but long-
    anticipated proposed regula-
    tions for operating retail mari-
    juana businesses in Maine.
    Medical marijuana busi-
    nesses have already been oper-
    ating in Maine. Also, personal,
    recreational use has been legal
    in Maine since the 2016 pas-
    sage of the Marijuana Legaliza-
    tion Act.
    The Office of Marijuana
    Policy April 23 released a
    73-page draft of the proposed
    rules to govern “Maine’s Adult
    Use Marijuana Program.”
    Maine contracted with a
    Colorado firm, Freedman &
    Koski, to write the rules.
    Back to the upcoming Town
    Meeting, which is scheduled
    for Tuesday, May 14, at 6:30
    p.m. at Hancock Grammar
    School.
    Article 83 on Hancock’s
    Town Meeting warrant asks:
    “Shall the town vote to
    authorize within the munici-
    pality the operation of adult
    use marijuana establishments
    provided they operate in com-
    pliance with all applicable state
    and local requirements?”
    Unrelated to the opt-in
    vote, the Hancock Plan-
    ning Board May 8 will hear
    an application for a CBD
    Hancock
    to vote on
    retail pot
    Continued on Page 12

    View full-size slide

  24. America’s Page One
    Volume 40, Number 15
    April 12 - April 18, 2019
    Your Community Newspaper Serving Palms West Since 1980
    TOWN-CRIER
    THE
    WELLINGTON • ROYAL PALM BEACH • LOXAHATCHEE • THE ACREAGE
    INSIDE
    DEPARTMENT INDEX
    NEWS ..............................3 - 22
    LETTERS ................................. 4
    NEWS BRIEFS ........................ 7
    PEOPLE .................................. 8
    SCHOOLS ............................... 9
    COLUMNS ............................18
    BUSINESS ............................ 21
    CALENDAR ...........................22
    SPORTS .........................23 - 24
    CLASSIFIEDS ............... 25 - 26
    Visit Us On The Web At
    WWW.GOTOWNCRIER.COM
    By Denis Eirikis
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    Palm Beach Sheriff Office Dis-
    trict 9 Capt. Ulrich Naujoks pre-
    sented the latest crime statistics
    to the Royal Palm Beach Village
    Council last week, which showed
    that the crime index in the village
    has fallen for the fifth consecutive
    year.
    At the Thursday, April 4 meet-
    ing, it was noted that while the
    village suffered an unusual two
    murders during the reporting pe-
    riod, after zero in the previous four
    years, robberies are at the lowest
    level in more than 20 years.
    The population of the village has
    almost doubled since 1998, when
    there were 8 reported robberies
    in the village, and only 9 robber-
    ies were reported last year. More
    good news included that home
    burglaries plummeted from 61 in
    2017 to 24 in 2018. Vehicle theft
    dropped from 61 to 45 reports, and
    aggravated assault fell from 51 to
    43 incidents.
    Larceny, which includes shop-
    lifting, rose slightly from 663 in-
    cidents to 690 incidents. Incidents
    at the Walmart store on State Road
    7, which draws customers from
    across the region, continues to lead
    the way in that category.
    Whether crime is on a rising
    trend or is falling is hugely im-
    portant. It can affect how much is
    spent on policing and other related
    services, how people vote and
    even property values.
    “Americans across the country
    are more afraid of crime, even
    though the crime rates are down,”
    Nikki Usher of George Washing-
    ton University said in a recent
    interview. “The media is reporting
    crime more, and in new ways. The
    more people consume bad news in
    the world, the more they believe it
    is more dangerous than it really is.”
    That might explain the discon-
    nect between the actual statistics
    reported and an informal survey
    this week on Royal Palm Beach
    Speaks, a social media site that
    boasts more than 3,000 members.
    In a self-selected survey, members
    who chose to respond, by a margin
    of about 10 to 1, felt crime that is
    actually rising in the village.
    “Regardless of what the statis-
    tics say — and we know they can
    be manipulated — many Royal
    Palm Beachers, especially long-
    time residents, feel inundated by
    crime, and it is adversely affect-
    ing our quality of life,” longtime
    resident Bob Markey said. “Those
    of us who have been here for years
    are shocked to the point of consid-
    ering moving away.”
    Jamieson Joseph, a transplant
    from New York, disagrees.
    “These people have no idea
    what a crime-filled town is like,”
    he said. “Ten years ago, few
    people were posting about crimes
    on Facebook and social media.
    We didn’t have cameras/videos
    on our homes and phones. People
    just weren’t as aware of crime in
    the neighborhood as we are now.”
    Counterpoint Estates resident
    Rhonda Dunker agreed.
    “You see the same posts over
    and over. It’s sort of an onslaught
    on your brain,” she said. “Posts
    like, ‘Do you know this person
    who rang my doorbell?’ … Which
    may be nothing at all or may be
    crime related, but it’s still hitting
    your brain all the time and reg-
    istering.”
    She also feels that society is
    more suspicious and pays more
    attention to their surroundings
    nowadays. “We are seeing a lot
    more online than we ever knew
    about in the past before the internet
    and access 24/7 to news, informa-
    tion and posts,” Dunker said.
    Dunker noted that she feels
    much more vulnerable to crime
    in Royal Palm Beach than she did
    when living in Wyoming.
    The FBI’s Uniform Crime Re-
    porting (UCR) program is a na-
    tionwide, cooperative statistical
    effort of nearly 18,000 municipal,
    college/university, county, state,
    tribal and federal law enforcement
    agencies voluntarily reporting data
    on crimes brought to their atten-
    tion. However, the FBI specifi-
    Statistics Show
    Crime Drop In
    RPB, But Public
    Perception Lags
    See RPB CRIME, page 22
    PRETTY IN PINK FASHION SHOW
    BLOOM EVENT BRINGS MOMS TO MALL
    SEE STORY, PAGE 3
    By Ron Bukley
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    At a meeting on Tuesday, April
    9, members of the Acreage Land-
    owners’ Association Board of
    Directors expressed concern about
    plans by Connect Church to build
    a new worship center at the south-
    east corner of Seminole Pratt
    Whitney Road and Banyan Blvd.
    The new facility is in its early
    stages of planning with Palm
    Beach County, whose planners
    reviewed the application recently.
    Connect Church has a permanent
    location on Okeechobee Blvd. in
    Royal Palm Beach with Sunday
    attendance of about 600, and cur-
    rently also holds Sunday meetings
    attended by about 200 congregants
    at Seminole Ridge High School.
    ALA Board Member Dixie
    ALA Discusses Plans For New Church In The Acreage
    Thiery said she was aware that the
    church had put in an application
    for development with the county
    but was concerned that the church
    had not made an effort to contact
    the ALA or the Indian Trail Im-
    provement District.
    “We should be working with
    them to find out what’s going
    on with building,” Thiery said.
    “People are supposed to come
    through us. I got an e-mail from
    the county, and they kind of acted
    like they don’t have to recognize
    us whatsoever. They didn’t tell
    ITID what was going on either.”
    Pastor Dale Faircloth said the
    site, located between Westlake to
    the south and the Publix shopping
    plaza to the north, is about 6.75
    acres. The design will be similar in
    design to existing nearby facilities,
    By M. Dennis Taylor
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    Outdoor icon Smokey Bear
    turns 75 this year, and as part of the
    year-long commemoration, he is
    appearing at the free Earth Day &
    Arbor Day Celebration at the Wel-
    lington Amphitheater on Saturday,
    April 27 from 4 to 7 p.m. The
    observance will be immediately
    followed by a Heart tribute concert
    featuring Love Alive.
    “Provided he isn’t called away
    to a fire, Smokey Bear will be at
    the event, courtesy of the Forestry
    Service,” said event organizer Mi-
    chelle Garvey, Wellington’s assis-
    tant parks and recreation director.
    Garvey explained that the kids
    enjoy meeting the costumed char-
    acter, who will help the children
    and the Wellington Village Coun-
    cil plant a tree on the grounds in
    honor of Arbor Day.
    “The celebration begins with
    proclamations about Earth Day
    and Arbor Day by the council, who
    will be planting the commemora-
    tive tree with the help of Smokey
    Bear and the children,” she said.
    The full afternoon of fun and
    learning features more than 20
    local vendors with earth-friendly
    products, favorite food trucks and
    more.
    “We partner with the Public
    Works Department, the Welling-
    ton Tree Board, the Wellington
    Garden Club and the Wellington
    Art Society, which will be selling
    nature-related items,” Garvey said.
    “The Tree Board and the Garden
    Club [members] will be giving
    away free seedlings and provid-
    ing information on proper pruning
    techniques, composting and just
    sharing their extensive knowledge
    with the community.”
    In addition to the free seedlings
    and other giveaways, there will be
    plenty of advice from experts and
    demonstrations of proper tech-
    niques. There is even a chance to
    win a tree in a 15-gallon container
    that is ready to transplant into
    some lucky, free-raffle winner’s
    yard to provide shade in just a
    few years.
    By Gina M. Capone
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    A new village ordinance regulat-
    ing nightclubs was given its initial
    approval by the Wellington Village
    Council after a public hearing on
    Tuesday, April 9.
    Spawned by a request from
    the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s
    Office after arrests at a concert in
    the Suri West parking lot in Wel-
    lington last August, ordinance
    2019-03 is intended to minimize
    the negative effects associated with
    nightclubs.
    Village Manager Paul Schofield
    explained that the ordinance was
    written to adopt similar rules like
    the ones in Palm Beach County,
    and is designed to combat under-
    age drinking, while addressing the
    businesses that may be affected.
    Planning, Zoning & Building
    Director Bob Basehart explained
    that the measure is intended to
    of “nightclub,” as well as minor
    definitions of “cocktail lounge”
    and “restaurant.”
    Secondly, the standards that are
    implemented by the ordinance will
    go into the land development regu-
    lations. This allows the village to
    grandfather-in existing businesses
    that operate as nightclubs and re-
    quire village approval of any new
    establishments that want to enter
    into the same business.
    Thirdly, the ordinance estab-
    lishes specific criteria to determine
    whether a business is a nightclub.
    If the establishment has four out of
    six criteria, it would be classified
    as a nightclub.
    These criteria are if a cover
    charge is paid, there is a dance
    floor or live music, alcohol is
    served, a onetime membership
    fee is paid, or the event happens
    during the specified hours, since
    Smokey Bear To Be A Guest At
    Wellington’s Earth Day Event
    Wellington Moves Forward On
    New Nightclub Regulations
    See EARTH DAY, page 22
    Women of the Western Communities held its annual fundraiser “Pretty in Pink” Spring Brunch &
    Fashion Show on Sunday, April 7 at the Wellington National Golf Club. Funds raised benefit the
    Mary Rubloff YWCA Harmony House and Women of the Western Communities scholarships. KOOL
    105.5 Morning Show Hosts Mo Foster and Sally Sevareid once again emceed this event, and
    Stein Mart provided fashions and accessories. Shown above are Mair Armand, Sally Sevareid, Mo
    Foster, Maggie Zeller, Jo Cudnik, Allyson Samiljan and Maureen Gross. MORE PHOTOS, PAGE 12
    PHOTO BY DENISE FLEISCHMAN/TOWN-CRIER
    The diversity of the polo community was on full display during
    the 10th annual Land Rover Palm Beach International Gay
    Polo Tournament, held on Saturday, April 6 at the International
    Polo Club Palm Beach. Shown above are Bradley Kompo, Celia
    Taylor, Jose Cano and Josh Elmassien. MORE PHOTOS, PAGE 5
    PHOTO BY DENISE FLEISCHMAN/TOWN-CRIER
    See CHURCH, page 22
    ROBERT SHORR NAMED NEW LOX MAYOR
    SEE STORY, PAGE 4
    Children will have a bevy of
    kids’ activities to enjoy, including
    face painting, a coloring mural,
    learning about recycling and re-
    specting the earth, plus the oppor-
    tunity to meet the longest-running
    public service trade character in
    U.S. history.
    Born by the hand of graphic art-
    ist Albert Staehle on Aug. 9, 1944,
    Smokey Bear was a commission
    by the USDA Forest Service and
    the Ad Council. Conceived as
    painted artwork of a fictional bear
    named Smokey, the character
    would become the symbol for for-
    est fire prevention for generations.
    Smokey worked with Bambi and
    other Disney characters on a poster
    when he was less than a year old.
    A popular anthem a decade later
    by Steve Nelson and Jack Rollins
    seemed to give Smokey the middle
    name “The” to fit the rhythmic
    lyrics of the song.
    “But the name has always been
    Smokey Bear,” Garvey noted.
    It is a moniker that has been
    further the efforts that the council
    has made over the last several
    years to minimize and eliminate
    the negative effects that nightclubs
    have on the surrounding public.
    He said that some of the issues of
    nightclubs are underage drinking,
    patrons overindulging in alcohol
    and being the cause of accidents,
    and vandalism in parking lots and
    surrounding neighborhoods, to
    name a few.
    After the PBSO suggested that
    Wellington adopt the county ordi-
    nance or something similar, Base-
    hart said that village staff elected
    to adopt a similar ordinance that
    would allow the municipality
    to oversee the ordinance and fit
    Wellington’s local needs and
    objectives.
    The ordinance has three com-
    ponents. The first is to specifi-
    cally define a nightclub. The
    ordinance amends the definition
    Groves Council Reviews
    Upcoming Applications
    Planning Consultant Jim Fleis-
    chmann reviewed several items
    last week that will be coming be-
    fore the newly configured Loxa-
    hatchee Groves Town Council in
    the near future, including devel-
    opment applications requesting
    to add retail uses to an existing
    application for office space, and
    another requesting commercial
    use near but not directly on
    Southern Blvd. Page 3
    Broncos Reclaim Lax
    Rivals Cup With 11-7
    Win Over Wellington
    The Palm Beach Central High
    School boys lacrosse team trav-
    eled across town to take on host
    Wellington High School on Fri-
    day, April 5 and bested the Wol-
    verines 11-7 for a big win. The
    victory marks the first in four
    years for the Broncos against
    Wellington, and in the wake of
    their performance, Palm Beach
    Central reclaimed the Outback
    Rivals Cup. Page 23
    See NIGHTCLUBS, page 4
    GPL TOURNAMENT
    MARKS 10 YEARS
    Pages 18 thru 19
    2019
    GUIDE
    such as the Acreage library, the
    Publix shopping center and the
    Walgreens store.
    “All that is set by code by the
    county, so you have to have wrap-
    around porches and those type of
    things,” Faircloth said. “By the
    time you meet their code, you’ve
    pretty well built a building that
    looks like the others.”
    The main building will be on
    Seminole Pratt Whitney Road with
    landscaping buffers on the road
    and a parking lot east of Banyan
    Blvd.
    “We’re currently rolling it out to
    the church,” Faircloth said. “We’re
    doing that on April 28.”
    Thiery said she was concerned
    that the congregation is using ITID
    roads.
    “They have some kind of ex-
    emptions,” Thiery said. “I don’t
    know what they are… but they
    didn’t talk to ITID. That’s our
    drainage, that’s our roads.”
    Faircloth said the congregation
    has met at Seminole Ridge for the
    past four years.
    “I go out there on Sunday morn-
    ing and, quite honestly, there’s
    no traffic on Sunday morning,”
    he said.
    Faircloth said Phase 1 of the proj-
    ect will call for a 10,000-square-
    foot multi-purpose building with
    parking and a stormwater basin
    on-site.
    “Phase 1 of the building will seat
    275,” he said. “There’s a couple
    of reasons why we haven’t been
    to any boards to talk about it. One
    is we just closed on it on Feb. 28,
    so we really just got the land…
    This is not something that we
    have completely rolled out to the
    church yet.”
    Faircloth said the church is still
    at the beginning of the necessary
    approval process.
    “If there is concern, and they
    would be open to have me come
    talk to them, I would love to
    do that,” he said. “We’re in the
    process of trying to put together a
    master site plan proposal. I’d love
    to think that we could complete
    that by the end of the year.”
    Faircloth said he understands
    Acreage residents’ negativity to
    new development.
    “My guess is the people of
    The Acreage are feeling put upon
    with all the development that’s
    happening, and they’ve become
    ‘Paws At The Mall’ Lets
    Guests Meet Dogs And
    Shop At Dog Retailers
    Animal Rescue Force of South
    Florida, Barky Pines Animal
    Rescue & Sanctuary and Palm
    Beach County Animal Care &
    Control hosted Paws at the Mall
    on Friday, April 5 at the Mall at
    Wellington Green. During the
    event, dogs were available for
    adoption. Mall guests had the
    chance to play with dogs, shop
    from a variety of dog retailers,
    enjoy kids’ activities and more.
    Page 10
    Wycliffe Stiffs Stickball
    League Celebrates 17
    Years At Luncheon
    The Wycliffe Stiffs celebrated
    its 17th anniversary at the
    Wycliffe Golf & Country Club
    on Thursday, April 4, showing
    that the game of stickball is
    alive and well. The luncheon
    included special performances
    by players and lots of laughs for
    guests. Page 17

    View full-size slide

  25. America’s Page One
    Volume 40, Number 15
    April 12 - April 18, 2019
    Your Community Newspaper Serving Palms West Since 1980
    TOWN-CRIER
    THE
    WELLINGTON • ROYAL PALM BEACH • LOXAHATCHEE • THE ACREAGE
    INSIDE
    DEPARTMENT INDEX
    NEWS ..............................3 - 22
    LETTERS ................................. 4
    NEWS BRIEFS ........................ 7
    PEOPLE .................................. 8
    SCHOOLS ............................... 9
    COLUMNS ............................18
    BUSINESS ............................ 21
    CALENDAR ...........................22
    SPORTS .........................23 - 24
    CLASSIFIEDS ............... 25 - 26
    Visit Us On The Web At
    WWW.GOTOWNCRIER.COM
    By Denis Eirikis
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    Palm Beach Sheriff Office Dis-
    trict 9 Capt. Ulrich Naujoks pre-
    sented the latest crime statistics
    to the Royal Palm Beach Village
    Council last week, which showed
    that the crime index in the village
    has fallen for the fifth consecutive
    year.
    At the Thursday, April 4 meet-
    ing, it was noted that while the
    village suffered an unusual two
    murders during the reporting pe-
    riod, after zero in the previous four
    years, robberies are at the lowest
    level in more than 20 years.
    The population of the village has
    almost doubled since 1998, when
    there were 8 reported robberies
    in the village, and only 9 robber-
    ies were reported last year. More
    good news included that home
    burglaries plummeted from 61 in
    2017 to 24 in 2018. Vehicle theft
    dropped from 61 to 45 reports, and
    aggravated assault fell from 51 to
    43 incidents.
    Larceny, which includes shop-
    lifting, rose slightly from 663 in-
    cidents to 690 incidents. Incidents
    at the Walmart store on State Road
    7, which draws customers from
    across the region, continues to lead
    the way in that category.
    Whether crime is on a rising
    trend or is falling is hugely im-
    portant. It can affect how much is
    spent on policing and other related
    services, how people vote and
    even property values.
    “Americans across the country
    are more afraid of crime, even
    though the crime rates are down,”
    Nikki Usher of George Washing-
    ton University said in a recent
    interview. “The media is reporting
    crime more, and in new ways. The
    more people consume bad news in
    the world, the more they believe it
    is more dangerous than it really is.”
    That might explain the discon-
    nect between the actual statistics
    reported and an informal survey
    this week on Royal Palm Beach
    Speaks, a social media site that
    boasts more than 3,000 members.
    In a self-selected survey, members
    who chose to respond, by a margin
    of about 10 to 1, felt crime that is
    actually rising in the village.
    “Regardless of what the statis-
    tics say — and we know they can
    be manipulated — many Royal
    Palm Beachers, especially long-
    time residents, feel inundated by
    crime, and it is adversely affect-
    ing our quality of life,” longtime
    resident Bob Markey said. “Those
    of us who have been here for years
    are shocked to the point of consid-
    ering moving away.”
    Jamieson Joseph, a transplant
    from New York, disagrees.
    “These people have no idea
    what a crime-filled town is like,”
    he said. “Ten years ago, few
    people were posting about crimes
    on Facebook and social media.
    We didn’t have cameras/videos
    on our homes and phones. People
    just weren’t as aware of crime in
    the neighborhood as we are now.”
    Counterpoint Estates resident
    Rhonda Dunker agreed.
    “You see the same posts over
    and over. It’s sort of an onslaught
    on your brain,” she said. “Posts
    like, ‘Do you know this person
    who rang my doorbell?’ … Which
    may be nothing at all or may be
    crime related, but it’s still hitting
    your brain all the time and reg-
    istering.”
    She also feels that society is
    more suspicious and pays more
    attention to their surroundings
    nowadays. “We are seeing a lot
    more online than we ever knew
    about in the past before the internet
    and access 24/7 to news, informa-
    tion and posts,” Dunker said.
    Dunker noted that she feels
    much more vulnerable to crime
    in Royal Palm Beach than she did
    when living in Wyoming.
    The FBI’s Uniform Crime Re-
    porting (UCR) program is a na-
    tionwide, cooperative statistical
    effort of nearly 18,000 municipal,
    college/university, county, state,
    tribal and federal law enforcement
    agencies voluntarily reporting data
    on crimes brought to their atten-
    tion. However, the FBI specifi-
    Statistics Show
    Crime Drop In
    RPB, But Public
    Perception Lags
    See RPB CRIME, page 22
    PRETTY IN PINK FASHION SHOW
    BLOOM EVENT BRINGS MOMS TO MALL
    SEE STORY, PAGE 3
    By Ron Bukley
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    At a meeting on Tuesday, April
    9, members of the Acreage Land-
    owners’ Association Board of
    Directors expressed concern about
    plans by Connect Church to build
    a new worship center at the south-
    east corner of Seminole Pratt
    Whitney Road and Banyan Blvd.
    The new facility is in its early
    stages of planning with Palm
    Beach County, whose planners
    reviewed the application recently.
    Connect Church has a permanent
    location on Okeechobee Blvd. in
    Royal Palm Beach with Sunday
    attendance of about 600, and cur-
    rently also holds Sunday meetings
    attended by about 200 congregants
    at Seminole Ridge High School.
    ALA Board Member Dixie
    ALA Discusses Plans For New Church In The Acreage
    Thiery said she was aware that the
    church had put in an application
    for development with the county
    but was concerned that the church
    had not made an effort to contact
    the ALA or the Indian Trail Im-
    provement District.
    “We should be working with
    them to find out what’s going
    on with building,” Thiery said.
    “People are supposed to come
    through us. I got an e-mail from
    the county, and they kind of acted
    like they don’t have to recognize
    us whatsoever. They didn’t tell
    ITID what was going on either.”
    Pastor Dale Faircloth said the
    site, located between Westlake to
    the south and the Publix shopping
    plaza to the north, is about 6.75
    acres. The design will be similar in
    design to existing nearby facilities,
    By M. Dennis Taylor
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    Outdoor icon Smokey Bear
    turns 75 this year, and as part of the
    year-long commemoration, he is
    appearing at the free Earth Day &
    Arbor Day Celebration at the Wel-
    lington Amphitheater on Saturday,
    April 27 from 4 to 7 p.m. The
    observance will be immediately
    followed by a Heart tribute concert
    featuring Love Alive.
    “Provided he isn’t called away
    to a fire, Smokey Bear will be at
    the event, courtesy of the Forestry
    Service,” said event organizer Mi-
    chelle Garvey, Wellington’s assis-
    tant parks and recreation director.
    Garvey explained that the kids
    enjoy meeting the costumed char-
    acter, who will help the children
    and the Wellington Village Coun-
    cil plant a tree on the grounds in
    honor of Arbor Day.
    “The celebration begins with
    proclamations about Earth Day
    and Arbor Day by the council, who
    will be planting the commemora-
    tive tree with the help of Smokey
    Bear and the children,” she said.
    The full afternoon of fun and
    learning features more than 20
    local vendors with earth-friendly
    products, favorite food trucks and
    more.
    “We partner with the Public
    Works Department, the Welling-
    ton Tree Board, the Wellington
    Garden Club and the Wellington
    Art Society, which will be selling
    nature-related items,” Garvey said.
    “The Tree Board and the Garden
    Club [members] will be giving
    away free seedlings and provid-
    ing information on proper pruning
    techniques, composting and just
    sharing their extensive knowledge
    with the community.”
    In addition to the free seedlings
    and other giveaways, there will be
    plenty of advice from experts and
    demonstrations of proper tech-
    niques. There is even a chance to
    win a tree in a 15-gallon container
    that is ready to transplant into
    some lucky, free-raffle winner’s
    yard to provide shade in just a
    few years.
    By Gina M. Capone
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    A new village ordinance regulat-
    ing nightclubs was given its initial
    approval by the Wellington Village
    Council after a public hearing on
    Tuesday, April 9.
    Spawned by a request from
    the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s
    Office after arrests at a concert in
    the Suri West parking lot in Wel-
    lington last August, ordinance
    2019-03 is intended to minimize
    the negative effects associated with
    nightclubs.
    Village Manager Paul Schofield
    explained that the ordinance was
    written to adopt similar rules like
    the ones in Palm Beach County,
    and is designed to combat under-
    age drinking, while addressing the
    businesses that may be affected.
    Planning, Zoning & Building
    Director Bob Basehart explained
    that the measure is intended to
    of “nightclub,” as well as minor
    definitions of “cocktail lounge”
    and “restaurant.”
    Secondly, the standards that are
    implemented by the ordinance will
    go into the land development regu-
    lations. This allows the village to
    grandfather-in existing businesses
    that operate as nightclubs and re-
    quire village approval of any new
    establishments that want to enter
    into the same business.
    Thirdly, the ordinance estab-
    lishes specific criteria to determine
    whether a business is a nightclub.
    If the establishment has four out of
    six criteria, it would be classified
    as a nightclub.
    These criteria are if a cover
    charge is paid, there is a dance
    floor or live music, alcohol is
    served, a onetime membership
    fee is paid, or the event happens
    during the specified hours, since
    Smokey Bear To Be A Guest At
    Wellington’s Earth Day Event
    Wellington Moves Forward On
    New Nightclub Regulations
    See EARTH DAY, page 22
    Women of the Western Communities held its annual fundraiser “Pretty in Pink” Spring Brunch &
    Fashion Show on Sunday, April 7 at the Wellington National Golf Club. Funds raised benefit the
    Mary Rubloff YWCA Harmony House and Women of the Western Communities scholarships. KOOL
    105.5 Morning Show Hosts Mo Foster and Sally Sevareid once again emceed this event, and
    Stein Mart provided fashions and accessories. Shown above are Mair Armand, Sally Sevareid, Mo
    Foster, Maggie Zeller, Jo Cudnik, Allyson Samiljan and Maureen Gross. MORE PHOTOS, PAGE 12
    PHOTO BY DENISE FLEISCHMAN/TOWN-CRIER
    The diversity of the polo community was on full display during
    the 10th annual Land Rover Palm Beach International Gay
    Polo Tournament, held on Saturday, April 6 at the International
    Polo Club Palm Beach. Shown above are Bradley Kompo, Celia
    Taylor, Jose Cano and Josh Elmassien. MORE PHOTOS, PAGE 5
    PHOTO BY DENISE FLEISCHMAN/TOWN-CRIER
    See CHURCH, page 22
    ROBERT SHORR NAMED NEW LOX MAYOR
    SEE STORY, PAGE 4
    Children will have a bevy of
    kids’ activities to enjoy, including
    face painting, a coloring mural,
    learning about recycling and re-
    specting the earth, plus the oppor-
    tunity to meet the longest-running
    public service trade character in
    U.S. history.
    Born by the hand of graphic art-
    ist Albert Staehle on Aug. 9, 1944,
    Smokey Bear was a commission
    by the USDA Forest Service and
    the Ad Council. Conceived as
    painted artwork of a fictional bear
    named Smokey, the character
    would become the symbol for for-
    est fire prevention for generations.
    Smokey worked with Bambi and
    other Disney characters on a poster
    when he was less than a year old.
    A popular anthem a decade later
    by Steve Nelson and Jack Rollins
    seemed to give Smokey the middle
    name “The” to fit the rhythmic
    lyrics of the song.
    “But the name has always been
    Smokey Bear,” Garvey noted.
    It is a moniker that has been
    further the efforts that the council
    has made over the last several
    years to minimize and eliminate
    the negative effects that nightclubs
    have on the surrounding public.
    He said that some of the issues of
    nightclubs are underage drinking,
    patrons overindulging in alcohol
    and being the cause of accidents,
    and vandalism in parking lots and
    surrounding neighborhoods, to
    name a few.
    After the PBSO suggested that
    Wellington adopt the county ordi-
    nance or something similar, Base-
    hart said that village staff elected
    to adopt a similar ordinance that
    would allow the municipality
    to oversee the ordinance and fit
    Wellington’s local needs and
    objectives.
    The ordinance has three com-
    ponents. The first is to specifi-
    cally define a nightclub. The
    ordinance amends the definition
    Groves Council Reviews
    Upcoming Applications
    Planning Consultant Jim Fleis-
    chmann reviewed several items
    last week that will be coming be-
    fore the newly configured Loxa-
    hatchee Groves Town Council in
    the near future, including devel-
    opment applications requesting
    to add retail uses to an existing
    application for office space, and
    another requesting commercial
    use near but not directly on
    Southern Blvd. Page 3
    Broncos Reclaim Lax
    Rivals Cup With 11-7
    Win Over Wellington
    The Palm Beach Central High
    School boys lacrosse team trav-
    eled across town to take on host
    Wellington High School on Fri-
    day, April 5 and bested the Wol-
    verines 11-7 for a big win. The
    victory marks the first in four
    years for the Broncos against
    Wellington, and in the wake of
    their performance, Palm Beach
    Central reclaimed the Outback
    Rivals Cup. Page 23
    See NIGHTCLUBS, page 4
    GPL TOURNAMENT
    MARKS 10 YEARS
    Pages 18 thru 19
    2019
    GUIDE
    such as the Acreage library, the
    Publix shopping center and the
    Walgreens store.
    “All that is set by code by the
    county, so you have to have wrap-
    around porches and those type of
    things,” Faircloth said. “By the
    time you meet their code, you’ve
    pretty well built a building that
    looks like the others.”
    The main building will be on
    Seminole Pratt Whitney Road with
    landscaping buffers on the road
    and a parking lot east of Banyan
    Blvd.
    “We’re currently rolling it out to
    the church,” Faircloth said. “We’re
    doing that on April 28.”
    Thiery said she was concerned
    that the congregation is using ITID
    roads.
    “They have some kind of ex-
    emptions,” Thiery said. “I don’t
    know what they are… but they
    didn’t talk to ITID. That’s our
    drainage, that’s our roads.”
    Faircloth said the congregation
    has met at Seminole Ridge for the
    past four years.
    “I go out there on Sunday morn-
    ing and, quite honestly, there’s
    no traffic on Sunday morning,”
    he said.
    Faircloth said Phase 1 of the proj-
    ect will call for a 10,000-square-
    foot multi-purpose building with
    parking and a stormwater basin
    on-site.
    “Phase 1 of the building will seat
    275,” he said. “There’s a couple
    of reasons why we haven’t been
    to any boards to talk about it. One
    is we just closed on it on Feb. 28,
    so we really just got the land…
    This is not something that we
    have completely rolled out to the
    church yet.”
    Faircloth said the church is still
    at the beginning of the necessary
    approval process.
    “If there is concern, and they
    would be open to have me come
    talk to them, I would love to
    do that,” he said. “We’re in the
    process of trying to put together a
    master site plan proposal. I’d love
    to think that we could complete
    that by the end of the year.”
    Faircloth said he understands
    Acreage residents’ negativity to
    new development.
    “My guess is the people of
    The Acreage are feeling put upon
    with all the development that’s
    happening, and they’ve become
    ‘Paws At The Mall’ Lets
    Guests Meet Dogs And
    Shop At Dog Retailers
    Animal Rescue Force of South
    Florida, Barky Pines Animal
    Rescue & Sanctuary and Palm
    Beach County Animal Care &
    Control hosted Paws at the Mall
    on Friday, April 5 at the Mall at
    Wellington Green. During the
    event, dogs were available for
    adoption. Mall guests had the
    chance to play with dogs, shop
    from a variety of dog retailers,
    enjoy kids’ activities and more.
    Page 10
    Wycliffe Stiffs Stickball
    League Celebrates 17
    Years At Luncheon
    The Wycliffe Stiffs celebrated
    its 17th anniversary at the
    Wycliffe Golf & Country Club
    on Thursday, April 4, showing
    that the game of stickball is
    alive and well. The luncheon
    included special performances
    by players and lots of laughs for
    guests. Page 17
    Volume 40, Number 16
    April 19 - April 25, 2019
    Your Community Newspaper Serving Palms West Since 1980
    TOWN-CRIER
    THE
    WELLINGTON • ROYAL PALM BEACH • LOXAHATCHEE • THE ACREAGE
    INSIDE
    DEPARTMENT INDEX
    NEWS ..............................3 - 20
    LETTERS ................................. 4
    NEWS BRIEFS ........................ 7
    PEOPLE .................................. 8
    SCHOOLS ............................... 9
    COLUMNS ............................ 16
    BUSINESS ............................19
    CALENDAR ...........................20
    SPORTS ........................ 21 - 22
    CLASSIFIEDS ................23 - 24
    Visit Us On The Web At
    WWW.GOTOWNCRIER.COM
    By Ron Bukley
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    Florida Power & Light repre-
    sentatives presented plans to build
    a solar farm on the Iota Carol prop-
    erty to the Indian Trail Improve-
    ment District Board of Supervisors
    on Wednesday, April 17.
    The Iota Carol property, al-
    most entirely surrounded by the
    GL Homes residential property
    west of The Acreage, was denied
    permission to build homes there
    by the Palm Beach County Com-
    mission in 2017. The land was
    subsequently sold to FPL.
    Matt Silver, FPL project man-
    ager for the solar farm, said the
    energy center will be called the
    Sabal Palm Solar Energy Center.
    “We have a property formerly
    known as the Iota Carol property,
    and we are going to be installing
    our second solar energy farm here
    in Palm Beach County,” Silver
    said, explaining that the solar farm
    will be located on the southern half
    of the 1,288-acre property north of
    60th Street between Carol Street
    and 190th Trail.
    “We believe solar energy centers
    make great neighbors,” he said.
    “They are virtually silent. There’s
    no lights at night or anything to
    that effect. There’s no increase
    in traffic. Once it’s in operation,
    there’s no water and certainly no
    fuel. There won’t be any pipelines
    or anything like that for a solar
    plant.”
    He added that the solar panels
    sit low to the ground at about 6.5
    to 8 feet, and the farm will remove
    a carbon emissions equivalent of
    12,000 cars.
    “It will power about 15,000
    homes right here in Palm Beach
    County and create about 200 con-
    struction assembly jobs once it’s
    under construction,” Silver said.
    The first phase will remove any
    invasive exotic plants.
    “The remaining vegetation will
    not be taken out because it’s on our
    neighbor’s property,” Silver said.
    “I will add that there’s no noise
    when you’re standing at the edge
    of the property. It’s essentially
    ambient noise.”
    Supervisor Tim Sayre asked
    how high the fence will be, and
    Silver said the fence will be six
    feet.
    “Did you get a waiver from the
    county? Because fences across
    front yards can only be 4 feet high,
    and I don’t know if they consider
    all that access front or not because
    there’s not an actual physical
    house on it,” Sayre said.
    Silver said that to his knowl-
    edge, FPL has not been required to
    get a waiver, but he would speak
    to the county about it.
    “We’re currently in the [devel-
    opment review] process, so I’m
    sure we’ll be getting some more
    comments back,” Silver said.
    Sayre added that he was aware
    that the remaining 640 acres is
    planned for agriculture, but he
    asked if there were long-range
    plans.
    “It’s entirely possible that there
    could be a second solar energy
    center,” Silver said, adding that
    the panels for the planned energy
    center will be fixed, facing roughly
    southward.
    Sayre said that he was con-
    cerned about plans to bring in a
    huge transformer on a large truck.
    “I assume you’re bringing it
    down Northlake [Blvd.] to Semi-
    nole Pratt Whitney [Road] and
    then down Orange [Blvd.] all the
    way out to the field there?” Sayre
    asked.
    Silver said that was one of the
    discussions FPL would need to
    have with ITID.
    The construction is slated to go
    on for nine months.
    “You’re going to be moving all
    kinds of equipment, and I don’t
    know how many solar panels,”
    Sayre said. “I don’t know what
    they weigh, but will you be over-
    weight on the semis going in and
    out on the roads?”
    “They won’t be overweight,”
    Silver replied. “They will be fol-
    lowing [Florida Department of
    Transportation] laws.”
    Sayre explained that he is con-
    cerned about the impact on Acre-
    age roads.
    “The long-term impact on the
    roads based on what it does to the
    substructure under the road with
    all the weight on it,” Sayre said.
    FPL, ITID Discuss
    Plans For Solar
    Farm At Iota Carol
    See SOLAR FARM, page 4
    FLAVORS FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL
    OWNER SEEKING MISSING DOG RUBY
    SEE STORY, PAGE 3
    By Gina M. Capone
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    Urban Air Adventure Park,
    an indoor family entertainment
    attraction, made its debut last
    weekend, opening at the site of the
    former H.H. Gregg store in front
    of the Mall at Wellington Green.
    The highly anticipated business
    launched with two days of grand
    opening festivities.
    Families gathered at the grand
    opening to assess and enjoy the
    unique amenities, such as vir-
    tual reality, the ropes course and
    climbing walls, jumping on tram-
    polines and playing in the tubes
    playground.
    Children engaged in recreation
    while parents watched or passed
    time snacking at the Urban Café
    or sipping wine and beer at the
    New Urban Air Adventure Park Opens In Wellington
    parents’ lounge, where bar stools
    and tables face television screens.
    The cool temperature indoors
    allowed patrons to enjoy physical
    activities inside, out of the hot sun,
    and even host birthday parties in
    the oversized private rooms. Each
    party room includes a long table
    with a television, a private host
    who attends to all of the details and
    makes sure the birthday girl or boy
    has the right decorations and food
    to enjoy the special day.
    Saleem Fernandez from Texas
    and Bobby Kreusler from Florida
    own the new Wellington facility.
    Both were on hand to greet the
    community with a soft opening on
    Friday, April 12 for first respond-
    ers, and to meet the general public
    at the grand opening on Saturday,
    April 13.
    By Gina M. Capone
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    Wellington’s Architectural Re-
    view Board approved exterior
    modifications for the 6,000-square-
    foot Ford’s Garage restaurant site
    at the Mall at Wellington Green on
    Wednesday, April 17.
    The burger and beer chain is
    slated to open on June 4, and the
    Wellington restaurant will be the
    first to open on the east coast of
    Florida.
    Ford’s Garage was seeking
    board approval of a metal insulated
    canopy, railings, colors and modi-
    fications to the exterior elevations
    of the building. The Planning &
    Zoning Department received a
    justification statement from Sol
    Design LLC, the architect of
    record.
    Representing Ford’s Garage
    was Stacy Cofield, joint venture
    partner for Ford’s Garage South
    Florida, as well as Carlos Molnar
    and Joseph Caiazza of Sol Design.
    “This is our first meeting for
    the exterior canopy area and en-
    closures for the patios,” Molnar
    said before the meeting. “We
    have been under construction for a
    couple of months now at the Mall
    at Wellington Green for the interior
    work, and now we are working on
    bringing along the exterior.”
    The restaurant will be located
    near the main entrance to the mall
    near the food court. The Welling-
    ton location is important to Ford’s
    Garage.
    “We have roots here because of
    our past association with Outback
    Steakhouse,” Cofield said. “Tim
    Gannon, one of our original found-
    ers of Outback, resides in Palm
    Beach and has for some time. So,
    we are resource-rich here with past
    management and employees. We
    have a very rich relationship with
    Starwood Capital Group as well.”
    Starwood Capital Group is the
    owner of the Mall at Wellington
    Green.
    Cofield explained why Ford’s
    Garage is unique. “The restaurants
    are unique because all of the food
    is fresh. We don’t use any frozen
    By M. Dennis Taylor
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    Wellington officials are hoping
    that before the upcoming hurricane
    season begins, as many people as
    possible will register for the new
    Wellington Alert system that pro-
    vides emergency information from
    the village, Palm Beach County
    and the Federal Emergency Man-
    agement Association’s integrated
    public alert system.
    “It is so important that residents
    register now before a storm hits
    our area,” said Liz Nunez with
    Wellington’s public communica-
    tions department. “We are going to
    be very active on getting as many
    people signed up as possible.”
    Residents should expect an
    intensive campaign over the next
    few weeks trumpeting the new
    community alert system that re-
    places the old Code Red system.
    People who received the older
    While most people are likely
    to sign up for alerts in English,
    speakers of other languages can
    get their alerts translated in 11
    languages, including Spanish and
    Creole, Nunez said.
    Registration for Alert Wel-
    lington is simple. Just go to the
    village’s web site at www.wel-
    lingtonfl.gov starting next week
    and sign up. Even with the word
    just now starting to get out, there
    are already several hundred names
    on the list. “Of course, we want to
    get as many people as possible,”
    Nunez said.
    Nunez noted that because of the
    village’s growing senior popula-
    tion and that, as a group, the senior
    segment is less likely to use social
    media, the village is offering
    plenty of assistance getting seniors
    signed up for the new alert system.
    Using a computer is necessary
    Wellington Board OKs Ford’s
    Garage Restaurant At Mall
    Sign-Up Now For Emergency
    Info From ‘Alert Wellington’
    See ARB, page 4
    Flavors of Wellington, the annual food and wine festival hosted by the Wellington Chamber of
    Commerce, returned to the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center on Friday, April 12 for
    an evening of music, food and fun. Shown above are Wycliffe Golf & Country Club’s Executive
    Chef Christopher Park, Chef Zoltan Beders, Shayn Klis and Jesus Longo, who took the Best in
    Show Display award. MORE PHOTOS, PAGE 5
    PHOTO BY CALLIE SHARKEY/TOWN-CRIER
    “Divine Wine and High Tea With an Oriental Flair” was held
    on Sunday, April 14 at the original Wellington Mall. Proceeds
    went to the Vivian and Adrienne Ferrin Memorial Scholarship
    Fund. My Lovely Couture provided fashions for a fashion show.
    Shown above are Hildreth Stoddart Brown and Audrey Gordon.
    MORE PHOTOS, PAGE 15
    PHOTO BY DENISE FLEISCHMAN/TOWN-CRIER
    See URBAN AIR, page 4
    DESIGNER’S TOUCH HAS A NEW HOME
    SEE STORY, PAGE 7
    products. There is a heightened
    awareness of the service. There is
    uniqueness in the brand. The menu
    is innovative. We are a family
    driven restaurant,” he said.
    The original location of Ford’s
    Garage opened in the historic dis-
    trict of Fort Myers in 2012, close
    to the famed winter residence of
    Henry Ford. With 12 locations,
    Ford’s Garage at the Mall at Wel-
    lington Green will have a similar
    feel, with the ambiance of being
    in a service station in the 1920s
    with vintage Ford vehicles and
    gas pumps.
    The menu has an assortment
    of gourmet burgers, chicken and
    vegetarian products with salads
    and light fare to please everyone.
    They also specialize in “comfort
    food” with the likes of homemade
    meatloaf, chili and macaroni and
    cheese.
    American craft beer is the spe-
    cialty of the restaurant, but they
    also offer wine and cocktails, as
    well as non-alcoholic beverages.
    Code Red messages must sign up
    for the new system. “That way, the
    contacts and names are as current
    as possible,” Nunez said.
    The system will call a traditional
    home landline, send a text to a cell
    phone and/or an e-mail to reach
    residents. There is an associated
    app called “Alert Me Mobile,”
    which can be downloaded for free
    and works on Apple or Android
    phones or smartwatches.
    “The messages can alert you
    about hurricanes, storms, torna-
    does and other weather events,
    evacuation orders, boil water
    notifications, road closings — both
    emergency closings and things like
    inconvenient lane closures before
    a commute — and even commu-
    nity events,” Nunez explained.
    “It lets residents determine what
    information they would like to
    receive and how they would like
    to receive it.”
    Indian Trail Workshop
    Considers Changes
    In Staff Benefits
    The Indian Trail Improvement
    District Board of Supervisors
    wrestled with its organizational
    and salary-range chart at a
    workshop Wednesday, April 17,
    trying to keep staff salaries and
    benefits competitive, so it does
    not lose experienced staff in a
    competitive job market. Page 3
    Bronco Girls Lacrosse
    Team Dominates
    Seminole Ridge 16-2
    The Palm Beach Central High
    School girls lacrosse team host-
    ed rival Seminole Ridge High
    School on Wednesday, April
    10 and dominated the Hawks
    16-2. The victory added to the
    celebration of the Broncos’ se-
    nior night. Palm Beach Central
    (6-9) opened up the contest in
    control of the tempo. Page 21
    See ALERT, page 4
    DIVINE WINE & HIGH TEA
    Pages 16 thru 17
    2019
    GUIDE
    Kreusler, a West Palm Beach na-
    tive, knows the area and works in
    the sports management business.
    He believes, as does Fernandez,
    that Wellington is the perfect com-
    munity for Urban Air Adventure
    Park, which has 79 franchise stores
    in the United States, Canada and
    the United Kingdom.
    Fernandez, an entrepreneur and
    businessman, owns four Urban
    Air franchise locations in Texas
    and Arkansas, and now in Florida.
    “Urban Air Adventure Park is
    a big deal out west and is now
    catching on in the east coast,” he
    explained. “All of our stores are
    well staffed, clean and sanitized,
    where we take pride in the décor,
    and what we offer families.”
    The father of three girls, Fernan-
    Patron Brostrie Scayle (center) is helped in a virtual reality
    adventure by Urban Air staff members Erik and Adam Dokken.
    PHOTO BY GINA M. CAPONE/TOWN-CRIER
    Wellington Seniors Club
    Spring Dinner Dance
    The Wellington Seniors Club
    held its annual Spring Dinner
    Dance on Friday, April 12 at
    the Mayacoo Lakes Country
    Club. Lu White & Friends played
    oldies music that kept guests
    dancing all evening. One lucky
    person from each table won the
    fresh floral centerpieces.
    Page 13
    Wellington Garden Club
    Presents Unique Tour
    The Wellington Garden Club’s
    largest fundraiser of the year
    brought a sold-out crowd on
    a special tour of the Deeridge
    Farms gardens on Saturday,
    April 13. The tour covered more
    than 60 acres of farms and
    gardens. Page 10
    Volume 40, Number 17
    April 26 - May 2, 2019
    Your Community Newspaper Serving Palms West Since 1980
    TOWN-CRIER
    THE
    WELLINGTON • ROYAL PALM BEACH • LOXAHATCHEE • THE ACREAGE
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    Visit Us On The Web At
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    By Ron Bukley
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    Loxahatchee Groves has a new
    neighbor, on an 80-acre site, grow-
    ing sod for the Miami Dolphins
    and the Hard Rock Stadium in
    Miami Gardens.
    Matt Tacilauskas manages the
    facility, located north of North
    Road between B and C roads. He
    said that the first planting of sod is
    now growing.
    “That’s the first field we plant-
    ed,” Tacilauskas said. “We’re hop-
    ing it will be ready for use during
    the football season this fall.”
    Tacilauskas was a golf course
    superintendent for 20 years, most
    recently at the Palm Beach Coun-
    try Club, before he started working
    for the Dolphins, first as a consul-
    tant and then taking over the sod
    operation.
    The Dolphins organization
    bought the site last year and has
    been busy preparing the land and
    transplanting more than 1,000 na-
    tive sabal palms that were on the
    site to the front to act as a buffer.
    The Dolphins previously were
    using independent contractors
    in Alabama, Georgia and North
    Carolina to haul in sod. The fran-
    chise saw the opportunity to source
    the sod locally, keeping the busi-
    ness in Florida and cutting down
    on the environmental footprint to
    transport it.
    The site includes 100 percent
    water retention to ponds located on
    site. “We’re injecting a lot of their
    ways into this place in regard to
    how it’s set up environmentally,”
    Tacilauskas said. “One-hundred
    percent of this property is self-
    contained. Right up to the perim-
    eter, all the water comes back to
    these ponds.”
    The site includes a maintenance
    Loxahatchee Farm
    Growing Sod For
    Miami Dolphins
    See SOD FARM, page 7
    ANNUAL WELLINGTON EGG HUNT
    RESCUED FOALS AT PURE THOUGHTS
    SEE STORY, PAGE 3
    By Denis Eirikis
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    The Marines are ready to land in
    Royal Palm Beach, which is great
    news for area nonprofit organiza-
    tions as squads of retired Marines
    and other veterans act as a free
    cavalry, showing up to provide
    manpower and skills, ready for
    hard work.
    Unified Dream, a nonprofit
    organization headquartered in
    Royal Palm Beach, is made up of
    about 50 local veterans. Under the
    command of retired Marine Corps
    Sgt. Jake Hampu, Unified Dream
    partners with local organizations
    in need of help.
    Their mission is that of serving
    organizations needing manpower,
    while providing disabled Marines
    with the therapeutic value of
    Retired Marines Organize To Serve The Community
    working hard alongside others on
    a detail of cooperation for mutual
    benefit. Helping other nonprofits
    and thereby helping themselves,
    they bring light where lives may
    have grown dark, lost in the shad-
    ows of time after active duty.
    “We breed warriors, send them
    off to battle, bring them back, give
    them a DD 214 and handshake,”
    said Hampu, who explained that
    society too often writes these
    service men and women off and
    forgets them as they return, broken
    by war.
    Hampu recounted heartbreaking
    stories of loss as he described that
    some veterans with Post Traumatic
    Stress Disorder (PTSD) are so un-
    derserved, sometimes so broken,
    that they have started to commit
    suicide at startling rates. “Vets
    By Gina M. Capone
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    Palm Beach County Sheriff’s
    Office Capt. Rolando Silva pre-
    sented the PBSO’s District 8 an-
    nual report comparing statistics
    from 2018 to the previous year
    at the Wellington Village Council
    meeting on Tuesday, April 23.
    “This report will reveal that we
    have had a banner year,” explained
    Silva, commander of the PBSO’s
    substation in Wellington. “As far
    as our trajectory with reported
    crimes, it is continuing to get
    better.”
    Silva led the council through a
    PowerPoint presentation focused
    on crime statistics.
    “Person crimes, property crimes
    and crashes are all down,” he
    noted. “Arrests are down a little
    bit with robberies. We had 13 rob-
    bery arrests in 2017, and we had
    one less in 2018, but the arrests
    for burglaries are up about 14.10
    percent.”
    Mayor Anne Gerwig asked
    Silva to clarify the difference
    between a robbery and a burglary.
    “A robbery is when the victim
    is a person. So, if you take some-
    thing from a person with threat or
    actual violence, this constitutes a
    robbery,” he explained. “This is
    always a felony and is a serious
    crime because the victim is a per-
    son. A burglary is a theft of break-
    ing and entering into a structure
    or a car.”
    Vehicle crashes tend to increase
    slightly during the equestrian
    season, but Silva said that is not
    surprising.
    “This slide shows there was a 13
    percent reduction in crashes [in the
    off season],” he said. “It goes down
    a little bit during the summer and
    picks back up during the season. I
    think that is good news.”
    Traffic citations and warnings
    are up from the previous year.
    “These are up about 15 percent for
    citations and 25 percent in written
    warnings,” Silva said. “We went
    down a little bit in verbal warnings.
    But we like to think that some of
    these efforts resulted in keeping
    By Ron Bukley
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    The Indian Trail Improvement
    District Board of Supervisors has
    set Wednesday, May 1 to hold its
    first public hearing on the budget
    for fiscal year 2019-20.
    “At this point, there are no pro-
    posed increases,” ITID President
    Betty Argue told the Town-Crier
    on Wednesday.
    The board was able to add
    another culvert crew and add a
    district executive director, as well
    as create a road improvement
    fund, relying on carryover from
    this year for a proposed budget of
    $18,576,613.
    “The budget has increased, but
    the assessments have not,” Argue
    said. ‘The reason for the budget
    increasing is because we’re creat-
    ing those additional pots of money
    for future planning, like the road
    repaving of the existing R2 roads
    did have an assessment increase
    for the 2018-19 budget year in
    anticipation of capital projects,
    including paving and drainage im-
    provements, culvert replacement
    and swale renovation, responding
    to residents’ complaints about bad
    conditions.
    “It was for increased funds that
    we needed for infrastructure im-
    provements like the culvert crew
    and equipment that we would need
    to do that,” Argue said. “We’re
    finding that it is far more afford-
    able for us to go this path with [the]
    amount that we have to do, rather
    than contracting each individual
    one out.”
    Argue said that the implementa-
    tion of a second culvert crew will
    cut the total completion time about
    in half, from the year 2050 to 2030.
    “It’s still 10 years away from
    being complete on that, but we’re
    Wellington Council Pleased
    With PBSO’s Annual Report
    ITID To Hold Public Hearing
    May 1 On Next Year’s Budget
    See PBSO REPORT, page 18
    Thousands of eggs, hundreds of kids and beautiful weather added up to another successful
    Wellington Egg Hunt on Saturday, April 21 in Village Park. The free family event included music,
    prizes and vendors. Even the Easter Bunny himself took the time to come out and join the fun.
    Shown above, Ashlynn Jurgens and Verona Campbell count their eggs. MORE PHOTOS, PAGE 5
    PHOTO BY CALLIE SHARKEY/TOWN-CRIER
    The Pilot Polo Team won the CaptiveOne U.S. Open Final, de-
    feating Las Monjitas 12-7 at the International Polo Club Palm
    Beach in Wellington on Sunday, April 21. Completing a perfect
    season, Pilot captured the inaugural Gauntlet of Polo. Shown
    above, Pilot team members Facundo Pieres, Gonzalito Pieres,
    Matias Gonzalez and Curtis Pilot celebrate their victory.
    MORE PHOTOS, PAGE 14
    PHOTO BY GINA M. CAPONE/TOWN-CRIER
    See VETS GROUP, page 18
    REP. LOIS FRANKEL VISITS BINKS FOREST
    SEE STORY, PAGE 7
    down the crash numbers.”
    Silva compared how Wellington
    measures up to other similar com-
    munities in terms of crime.
    “Population-wise, we are in
    the middle between Boca Raton,
    Delray Beach and Palm Beach
    Gardens,” Silva said. “When it
    comes to residential burglaries per
    100 residents, or per capita, we are
    down at the absolute lowest. So, I
    think that is remarkable. When it
    comes to vehicle burglaries, we are
    still the lowest.”
    Vice Mayor Michael Napoleone
    was impressed by how well Wel-
    lington stacks up against its peer
    municipalities.
    “This is a remarkable slide. It
    reflects what a great job you are
    doing keeping our crime rate the
    lowest,” Napoleone said.
    Village Manager Paul Schofield,
    however, noted one item that is
    way up.
    “One thing that was up dramati-
    cally was traffic stops,” he said.
    “The PBSO has been making more
    [and] the drainage improvements
    needed.”
    The unused budget amounts
    from this year will cover increases,
    plus create contingencies to cover
    capital improvements in its five-
    year plan.
    “We’ve proposed that there be
    an increasing amount appropriated
    each year to go into a pot to do the
    road repaving plan,” Argue said.
    “We will be at $2.8 million from
    this proposed budget. That’s how
    much money we would have set
    aside for the road repaving proj-
    ect. I don’t think it’s going to be
    enough, but we’re working toward
    it, so that when it needs to be done,
    we don’t have to have a huge tax
    increase to cover it. That’s why it
    looks like a budget increase, but it
    isn’t really because we’re still stay-
    ing within the assessment dollars
    that we have.”
    Argue noted that the district
    ITID Board Agrees On
    Format For Executive
    Director Interviews
    The Indian Trail Improvement
    District Board of Supervisors
    scheduled Wednesday, May
    29 to interview candidates for
    a new district manager, which
    they renamed “executive direc-
    tor” to clear up confusion.
    Page 3
    Stephen Passeggiata
    Looks To Make Impact
    For The Wolverines
    Spring football has arrived, and
    area gridiron enthusiasts await
    with great anticipation to see
    what the local high schools
    have to bring to the turf. The
    Wellington High School football
    team returns a diverse weapon
    in rising senior Stephen Passeg-
    giata. At six foot, three inches
    and 230 pounds, he hopes to
    lead the Wolverines back into
    the postseason. Page 19
    See ITID BUDGET, page 18
    PILOT WINS GAUNTLET
    Page 15
    2019
    GUIDE
    come home, often disabled, and
    we are forgotten,” Hampu said.
    He explained that the objective
    of Unified Dream is to provide
    veterans with a good mission,
    a sense of camaraderie, and the
    wonderous, therapeutic value of
    working together as a team to
    advance worthy causes.
    Their service has been greatly
    appreciated in the 18 months since
    the organization began.
    “Jake and the veterans are the
    real deal. This is almost too good
    to be true,” said Christina Nico-
    demou, executive director of the
    Delray Beach Children’s Garden.
    The veterans have been de-
    ployed to the Children’s Garden
    at least monthly for a year.
    “Jake and a squad teach carpen- Unified Dream founder Jake Hampu works
    with children on a carpentry project.
    Bridge Opening,
    Charter School
    Among Concerns
    At Tuttle Royale
    By M. Dennis Taylor
    Town-Crier Staff Report
    The Royal Palm Beach Village
    Council last week reaffirmed its
    commitment to a charter school
    being built as part of a large de-
    velopment at the village’s southern
    end, and also expressed a desire to
    have the new bridge at Southern
    Blvd. and Tuttle Road open as
    soon as it could be.
    Developer Brian Tuttle is lead-
    ing the Tuttle Royale project along
    the south side of Southern Blvd.
    just west of State Road 7. It will
    include a variety of residential and
    commercial uses on the site of the
    former Acme Ranches community.
    Included will be a K-12 charter
    school with a STEAM (science,
    technology, engineering, art and
    math) theme. Tuttle said that be-
    cause of the Sunshine Law, he felt
    it was best to bring the matter up
    at a public meeting to ask the full
    council about their current attitude
    toward a charter school at the site.
    “My question is, in general, is
    the council excited about seeing
    the charter school or, in general, is
    the board leaving it up to the devel-
    oper,” Tuttle said at the Thursday,
    April 18 meeting, adding that the
    land could also be used for other
    options, such as office and medi-
    cal space.
    Tuttle also asked if the council
    really felt they needed the charter
    school, given that there are several
    in Royal Palm Beach already.
    Councilman Richard Valuntas
    said that he liked the idea.
    “One of the things that is in-
    See TUTTLE, page 4
    Grace Family Medicine
    Hosts Grand Opening
    In Wellington Plaza
    Grace Family Medicine held a
    grand opening ribbon cutting
    on Thursday, April 18 at 12785
    W. Forest Hill Blvd., Suite 8E,
    in the Wellington Plaza. Grace
    Family Medicine is a direct
    primary care office for all ages.
    They offer free meet-and-greets
    to get to know the doctor, with
    an appointment and same day
    or next day doctor visits.
    Page 13
    Ceremony At Braman
    Honors Teacher, School
    Employee Of The Year
    Braman Motorcars presented
    the 2019 Teacher of the Year
    and School-Related Employee
    of the Year with a free two-
    year lease on a new BMW on
    Thursday, April 18. The Palm
    Beach County School District
    also presented the winners with
    a check for $1,500 during the
    festivities. Page 10

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    Obituaries �����������������������5
    Police/Court �������������������6
    Sports �����������������������������14
    Wonderword ����������������� 12
    Today
    High ����������10:28 a�m� ������� 10:47 p�m�
    Low ������������ 4:10 a�m� ���������4:29 p�m�
    Tomorrow
    High �������������11:11 a�m� ���������11:25 p�m�
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    INsIdE TOday’s GLOuCEsTEr daILy TIMEs
    WWW.GLOUCESTERTIMES.COM
    Pot sales top $100M
    Page 20
    Finnish-American theater comes back on Cape Ann
    Page 9
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    A former Gloucester man
    faces charges tied to two of
    at least 10 break-ins at city
    businesses over the last two
    months.
    George Donahue Jr., 42,
    was arrested Tuesday at
    Salem District Court by
    Gloucester police Detec-
    tive Jonathan Trefry and
    members of the State Police
    Violent Fugitive Apprehen-
    sion Team, according to
    Gloucester police Lt. Michael
    Gossom, the lead detective
    on the investigation. Dona-
    hue was at the court on for a
    hearing on an unrelated mat-
    ter, police said.
    Donahue is accused of
    breaking into the Causeway
    Restaurant and the non-
    profit Wellspring House,
    both on Essex Avenue. He
    was arraigned Tuesday in
    Gloucester District Court on
    charges of:
    „ Breaking and enter-
    ing a building in the night-
    time with intent to commit
    a felony;
    „ Larceny from a building;
    „ Receiving stolen prop-
    erty under $1,200; and
    „ Malicious destruction of
    property under $1,200.
    Police said Donahue was
    identified after several wit-
    ness interviews and the exe-
    cution of search warrants
    at a residence in Gloucester
    and the hotel in Allston,
    where police said he had
    been staying.
    When Gloucester and Bos-
    ton police searched Dona-
    hue’s hotel room, Gossom
    said, officers found about 10
    Suspect charged in two break-ins
    By AndreA HolBrook
    Staff Writer
    Gloucester police have
    charged former Gloucester
    resident George Donahue
    Jr., 42, identified in part
    from this surveillance
    photo, with two in a series
    of break-ins that have
    occurred over the past
    few weeks.
    GLOUCESTER POLICE/
    Courtesy photo
    BOSTON — State campaign finance
    officials missed a deadline Wednesday to
    propose new rules aimed at closing a loop-
    hole for contributions from labor unions.
    The Office of Campaign and Political
    Finance is working on proposed changes
    to a controversial rule that allows unions
    to give up to $15,000 to a candidate every
    time that person runs for office. Its new
    regulations would be aimed at reducing
    super-sized union contribution levels.
    A spokesman for the independent state
    agency said the new rules won’t be avail-
    able this week, despite a self-imposed May
    1 deadline to release them.
    “We’re working out the final details,”
    State misses
    deadline to
    cinch ‘union
    loophole’
    By CHristiAn M. WAde
    Statehouse Reporter
    BOSTON — Lawmakers are fast-tracking
    plans to give cities and towns more money
    to fix potholes, but some say the dollars
    won’t be enough.
    As in previous years, Gov. Charlie Baker
    proposed borrowing $200 million to help
    351 cities and towns repave and make other
    transportation improvements.
    The money is tucked into a bill that seeks
    to borrow $1.5 billion for federally aided
    highway projects and another $200 million
    for rail upgrades.
    Baker’s proposal is short of the $300
    million in pothole money sought by com-
    munities, municipal representatives told a
    legislative panel Wednesday.
    “We believe that our local governments
    Governor,
    lawmakers
    wrangle
    over money
    for potholes
    By CHristiAn M. WAde
    Statehouse Reporter
    Local pie bakers showed off their
    skills as they helped the town
    library raises money for its
    programs.
    The Friends of TOPH Burn-
    ham Library hosted its annual Pie Fest
    fundraiser on Wednesday afternoon,
    where patrons could eat a slice of home-
    made pie for $3, with the money going to
    the library.
    About 20 people made and donated the
    pies, including apple, pecan, Key lime, pea-
    nut butter, and strawberry rhubarb. Others
    made rugelach, muffins, and cookies.
    Good eats for good reads
    PAUL BILODEAU/Staff photos
    Ruby Sullivan, 7, waits patiently as a chocolate pie is sliced up during the Annual Friends of the T.O.H.P Burnham Public Library Pie
    Fest Fundraiser, which was held on the third floor of the library.
    A group of people, in various stages of getting a piece of pie, talk during the Pie
    Fest on Wednesday.
    A strawberry rhubarb pie is sliced into
    serving pieces during the fundraiser.
    Pie Fest raises money for Essex library
    ROCKPORT — A Peabody
    man was sentenced to 21/2 to
    three years in state prison on
    Wednesday after pleading
    guilty to fentanyl and cocaine
    charges.
    Daniel Juan Carrion, 33,
    was indicted last November
    on fentanyl trafficking and
    possession of cocaine with
    intent to distribute following
    an investigation by Rockport
    police.
    At the time, he was on
    probation in Salem District
    Court for driving offenses.
    During a hearing in Salem
    Superior Court, Carrion
    pleaded guilty to reduced
    charges of possession of
    Man sent to prison
    in Rockport drug case
    By Julie MAngAnis
    Staff Writer
    ESSEX — The next phase of con-
    struction at the Northshore Mall
    could make it more of an attraction
    with a focus on entertainment,
    dining and retail, which could
    also benefit the region’s tourism
    industry.
    That was the message from the
    mall’s general manager to tourism
    industry and business leaders dur-
    ing a breakfast at Woodman’s in
    Essex on Wednesday morning.
    While not divulging any specific
    details, Mark Whiting explained
    that the mall will extend its new
    Promenade past the site of the
    former Sears department store
    — which will become a high-
    end fitness center — all the way
    down to Macy’s, adding still more
    Mall plans take center stage
    at regional tourism breakfast
    By etHAn ForMAn
    Staff Writer
    See SUSPECT, Page 7
    See POTHOLES, Page 7
    See UNIONS, Page 7
    See TOURISM, Page 2
    See CASE, Page 2
    RYAN MCBRIDE/Staff photo
    Northshore Mall General Manager Mark
    Whiting, speaks about the mall’s recent
    expansion plans.
    GT_GT_20190502_1_01,2,5,7
    GT_GT_20190502_1_01,2,5,7
    YELLOW
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    GT_GT_20190502_1_01
    FINAL-1 Wed, May 1, 2019 9:00:05 PM
    TODAY FRI SAT
    52°/43° 52°/49° 61°/47°
    The Cape and Islands’ Daily Newspaper
    Thursday, May 2, 2019
    DISTINGUISHED NEWSPAPER OF THE YEAR
    WEATHER & TIDES
    Advice ..................................... C3
    Business ................................. C4
    Cape & Islands ....................... A3
    Classifi ed ................................ C5
    Comics .................................... B5
    Crossword .............................. C8
    Health ..................................... C1
    Nation & World ...................... A6
    Obituaries .............................. C2
    Opinion ................................... A8
    Sports ..................................... B1
    Television ............................... C3
    Gulliver says: ‘Rain
    drain!’
    Complete forecast, B6
    SPORTS ◆ B1
    Sandwich baseball
    too much for Falmouth
    HEALTH ◆ C1
    Study: Time zones can
    shape human behavior
    capecodtimes.com • Vol. 83, No. 105 • $2.50 Cape & Islands
    By Tanner Stening
    [email protected]
    WASHINGTON, D.C. — Federal leg-
    islation that would protect the Mashpee
    Wampanoag Tribe’s beleaguered reservation
    is headed to the House floor for a full vote.
    The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe Reserva-
    tion Reaffirmation Act, introduced by U.S.
    Rep. William Keating, D-Mass., was the first
    bill debated Wednesday during the full U.S.
    House of Representatives Committee on
    Natural Resources markup session. Keating
    crafted the legislation in response to a law-
    suit brought in 2016 in the U.S. District Court
    of Massachusetts by neighbors of the tribe’s
    proposed $1 billion casino in Taunton. That
    lawsuit resulted in the U.S. Department of
    Interior reversing a decision it made the year
    before to take 321 acres of land in Taunton
    and Mashpee into trust on the tribe’s behalf.
    The legislation would clarify the tribe’s
    eligibility for that federal trust protection
    and prevent future legal challenges to the
    reservation.
    The committee voted 26-10, mostly along
    party lines, to move the bill to the floor.
    The tribe has one of the oldest relation-
    ships with the federal government, and
    has been “intentionally and systematically
    stripped of their lands,” U.S. Rep. Ruben
    Gallego, D-Ariz., said during an explanation
    Tribe bill
    headed to
    House fl oor
    for vote
    Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe
    Reservation Reaffi rmation Act
    moves forward in Congress
    amid internal turmoil
    By Geoff Spillane
    [email protected]
    HYANNIS — The Barnsta-
    ble County Fire and Rescue
    Training Academy could
    soon have a new home on
    the Upper Cape.
    Brig. Gen. Christopher
    Faux, executive director of
    Joint Base Cape Cod, and
    Barnstable County Adminis-
    trator John “Jack” Yunits Jr.
    have confirmed discussions
    are underway to relocate
    the academy from Hyannis
    to the base.
    The proposed relocation
    of the facility aligns with
    the vision of base leadership
    to establish a multijuris-
    dictional first responder
    training center there,
    according to Yunits.
    “It’s something that we
    definitely want to do,” Faux
    said. “There’s a lot of excess
    property on the base, and
    using it for first responder
    training is compatible with
    where we are going. We are
    waiting to hear more about
    what they need, and we are
    Fire academy
    may move to base
    County, military offi cials in talks to create
    regional fi rst responder training site
    SEE ACADEMY, A4
    By Eric Tucker
    wand Mary Clare Jalonick
    The Associated Press
    WASHINGTON — Pri-
    vate tensions between Justice
    Department leaders and spe-
    cial counsel Robert Mueller's
    team broke into public view
    in extraordinary fashion
    Wednesday as Attorney Gen-
    eral William Barr pushed back
    at the special counsel's "snitty"
    complaints over his handling of
    the Trump-Russia investiga-
    tion report.
    Testifying for the first time
    since releasing Mueller's
    report, Barr faced sharp ques-
    tioning from Senate Democrats
    who accused him of making
    misleading comments and
    seeming at times to be Presi-
    dent Donald Trump's protector
    as much as the country's top
    law enforcement official.
    The rift fueled allegations
    that Barr has spun Mueller's
    findings in Trump's favor and
    understated the gravity of
    Trump's behavior. The dis-
    pute is certain to persist, as
    Democrats push to give Muel-
    ler a chance to answer Barr's
    testimony with his own later
    this month.
    Barr separately informed the
    House Judiciary Committee
    Rift aired over Mueller report
    Attorney
    General
    William Barr
    testifies during
    a Senate
    Judiciary Com-
    mittee hearing
    on Capitol Hill
    in Washington
    on Wednes-
    day. [ANDREW
    HARNIK/THE
    ASSOCIATED
    PRESS]
    SEE TRIBE, A4
    Attorney General William Barr denies misleading
    Congress and showing bias toward Trump in Russia probe
    SEE BARR, A10
    In a plan to buy Sipson Island for preservation, the main house may be converted into an education center and the boathouse will remain. Private backers of the
    Orleans island sale have gone public in an attempt to persuade town meeting to purchase the property. [MERRILY CASSIDY/CAPE COD TIMES]
    By Ethan Genter
    [email protected]
    ORLEANS — In the middle of
    Pleasant Bay sits a 24-acre, $7.9
    million island. It is well mani-
    cured and surrounded by sandy
    beaches.
    Sipson Island has been in
    private hands since the 1700s,
    when it was bought by a group
    of colonists from a Native
    American sachem, but if a plan
    coordinated by the Friends of
    Pleasant Bay, the Sipson Island
    Trust and the town is approved
    by town meeting, the public
    could have access forever .
    On May 13, voters will have
    the chance to approve $1.5 mil-
    lion in community preservation
    funds to buy a conservation
    restriction on 18 of the 24 acres.
    Cheryl and Rich Nadler, of
    Orleans, have a purchase-and-
    sale agreement with the current
    owners, and all but two of the
    acres eventually will be owned
    by the Sipson Island Trust, a
    soon-to-be nonprofit orga-
    nization that plans to in turn
    buy the land from the Nadlers
    through fundraising. The two
    remaining acres have a cottage
    on them and would continue to
    be privately owned.
    The conservation restriction
    would guarantee public access
    on the long stretches of sandy
    beach and the grassy trails that
    run across the island.
    Rich Nadler initially got
    involved with the island through
    his seat on the Conserva-
    tion Commission. He saw the
    potential for development on
    the island and suggested to his
    wife that they could play the role
    of a private partner to preserve
    the island.
    “I understood its unique
    beauty, historic and environ-
    mental significance, as well as
    its fragile vulnerability,” Nadler
    wrote in an open letter to the
    A ‘one-time opportunity’
    Orleans voters must decide if private island is worth cost of public access
    SEE ISLAND, A4
    By Beth Treffeisen
    [email protected]
    FALMOUTH — Acts of hate
    aimed at Jewish people and
    institutions in Massachusetts
    have hit all-time highs over the
    past two years, according to an
    audit by the Anti-Defamation
    League, and community lead-
    ers on Cape Cod say it’s time to
    acknowledge the problem.
    Confronting
    hate: Cape
    group raises
    awareness
    Anti-Semitic incidents
    in state skyrocket
    SEE HATE, A4
    Find more online
    • BUSINESS: Worcester inter-
    ested in another Pawtucket
    institution, Hasbro
    Find this and more of the
    latest news online:
    milforddailynews.com
    • THE CONVERSATION: How
    African-Americans disap-
    peared from the Kentucky
    Derby.
    Find this and other news in
    the E-Edition Extra, an extra
    section of the digital version
    of the newspaper for our
    subscribers:
    milforddailynews.
    me.newsmemory.com
    SATURDAY
    A shower
    66° / 46°
    FRIDAY
    A few showers
    54° / 49°
    TODAY
    A little rain
    54° / 42°
    Volume 132, Issue 122, 24 Pages, 2 Sections
    Home delivery: 888-697-2737
    News tips: 508-634-7562
    STAT E | A 8
    BOSTON MAYOR
    PUSHES FOR EQUALITY
    Walsh urges Legislature to keep
    pressure on employers to close gender,
    racial gaps
    W EEKEND | B 7
    BERNADETTE PETERS
    POPS INTO BOSTON
    The popular Broadway and film
    star sings songs from her hit
    musicals May 8-9 at Symphony Hall
    LO CA L | A 3
    FORMER
    ADDICT
    SHARES
    STORY
    IN HOLLISTON
    With prom
    approaching, pro
    BMX rider warns of
    ‘gateway drugs’
    Classifieds .........B11
    Comics ............. B10
    Legals .............A4, 8
    Obituaries .........A10
    Opinion .............A11
    Television ........... A9
    BY JESSICA TRUFANT
    DAILY NEWS STAFF
    MEDWAY — The mountain in many
    cultures symbolizes the obstacles we en-
    counter on the journey of life.
    So in honor of those who face a tough
    climb in the fight against cancer, Medway
    native Pamela Bennett on June 20 took on
    a mountain of her own.
    Roberts
    after health
    care ruling
    NATION, A2
    Oil sanctions
    being felt
    in Iran
    BUSINESS, A10
    milforddailynews.com MONDAY, JULY 2, 2012 VOLUME 125 • NUMBER 303 • 20 PAGES • 2 SECTIONS • $1
    Sox win
    to gain split
    SPORTS, B1
    HONORED AS A
    DISTINGUISHED
    NEWSPAPER
    by the New England
    Newspaper
    Association
    The
    DAILYNEWS
    MILFORD
    ■ See what’s happening at the Milford
    library this week. A7
    ■ A Daily Deal, just for you. A3
    These stories you’ll find only in today’s
    print edition of the Daily News
    INDEX
    80/65
    Thunderstorms today,
    clouds, thunderstorms
    later this week.
    Regional forecast, A2
    LOCAL WEATHER
    Classified ......... B8-9
    Comics .................B7
    Crossword ...........B7
    Local News ......A3, 7
    Lottery .................A2
    Nation & World ....A2
    Obituaries ............A8
    Opinion ................A9
    Soduku .................B7
    Sports ......... B1-4, 10
    State ....................A4
    Television .............B6
    WHAT’S GOING ON HERE? By Derek McLean | Daily News staff
    Fresh look for traditional cause
    Boxes Lions use to collect
    eyeglasses get coat of paint,
    and some new graphics
    MILFORD — Milford residents
    passing by the Main Street police sta-
    tion and the Purchase Street Market
    may notice big yellow collection boxes
    on the sidewalk in front of the build-
    ings.
    The boxes are part of a long-standing
    drive by the Milford Lions Club which
    collects donated eyeglasses.
    “Its amazing how many eyeglasses
    we collect,” said the local Lions Club
    president Brian Bodio.
    He said the club receives around 100
    eyeglasses among the two collections,
    when the boxes are emptied every two
    months.
    He said after collecting them, he
    sends the glasses to the state Lions
    Club District 33-A headquarters to be
    restored, refurbished and “provided to
    those in need.”
    The drop boxes have been in place
    for more than 30 years, but during the
    spring they received new graphics and
    were repainted.
    Bodio said the Lions are the largest
    international service organization in
    CARE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT
    SOMETHING? Contact Derek McLean
    at dmclean@wickedlocal.
    com or 508-634-7582.
    End of
    sparkler
    ban urged
    BY MIKE GLEASON
    DAILY NEWS STAFF
    HOLLISTON — A local
    candidate for state repre-
    sentative has come out
    against the state ban on
    sparklers, the small burning
    metal torches that emit
    sparks, often used by chil-
    dren.
    Marty Lamb, a Republi-
    can candidate for the 8th
    Middlesex seat, said he got
    interested in the matter after
    the state Legislature last
    month overwhelmingly re-
    jected a measure to legalize
    sparklers. He called the
    move a symbol of overregu-
    lation in the state.
    “To me, it seems absurd,”
    said Lamb, who is running
    against incumbent Demo-
    crat Carolyn Dykema.
    “Forty-six states allow fire-
    works, with sparklers being
    on the low end of that.”
    The timing of the vote, he
    said, only brings the prob-
    lem into sharper focus.
    “As we get into the Fourth
    of July holiday, it’s a good
    example of how the govern-
    ment controls every aspect
    of our lives,” he said.
    Lamb said the state has
    been inconsistent in ban-
    ning unsafe materials.
    “This is the same Legisla-
    ture that voted to decrimi-
    nalize marijuana,” he said.
    “That strikes me as them
    talking out of both sides of
    FIREWORKS
    Lamb calls law ‘absurd,’ but fire
    marshal says they are dangerous
    MEDWAY NATIVE
    Woman scales Mt. Shasta to
    raise money to fight disease
    The American Legion color guard marches down
    Main Street during the Fourth of July parade in
    Franklin yesterday. At left, Eric Lewis, 7, of Cub
    Scout Troop 126, rides the American flag float. PHOTOS
    BY DAN HOLMES
    Freedom march
    the world.
    He said the Milford Club has so far
    raised $12,000 for the Massachusetts
    Lions Eye Research Fund, and over
    $180,000 over the past two decades.
    Lions Clubs in the state raise more
    than $1 million each year to the fund
    for eye research.
    Boxes Lions use to collect
    eyeglasses have received a
    new coat of paint and
    graphics. DAILY NEWS PHOTO BY
    DEREK MCLEAN
    MENDON
    Horribles
    coming
    to town
    BY MIKE GLEASON
    DAILY NEWS STAFF
    MENDON — The annual
    Horribles Parade — featur-
    ing local children in costume
    marching down Maple
    Street – is set to take place
    tomorrow evening.
    The parade, which starts
    off at 6:30 p.m., is open to
    Rising above cancer
    ONLINE EXTRA For more
    photos of Franklin’s parade,
    go to milforddailynews.com.
    Bennett
    Medway
    native
    Pamela
    Bennett
    climbed Mt.
    Shasta to
    raise money
    to fight
    cancer.
    CONTRIBUTED
    PHOTOS
    INDEPENDENCE DAY
    Towns to hold
    holiday bashes
    BY MATT TOTA
    MILFORD DAILY NEWS STAFF
    Using fireworks, food,
    music, and parades, area
    towns this week will cele-
    brate Independence Day
    with a slew of Star-Span-
    gled extravaganzas.
    Milford — tomorrow
    Fireworks shot from
    Clark’s Island on Milford
    Pond will paint the sky
    starting at 10 p.m. The is-
    land has served as a launch-
    ing pad for the town’s fire-
    works display for more than
    10 years.
    Parks Department Direc-
    tor Michael Bresciani sug-
    gests watching the display
    from Plains Park, Fortune
    Boulevard, Fino Field or
    anywhere around Rte. 85.
    The Milford Lions Club
    Fireworks,
    rides, food to
    mark birthday
    of America
    SEE HORRIBLES, A5
    SEE SPARKLERS, A8
    SEE TOWNS, A8
    SEE RISING, A7
    The
    DAILYNEWS
    MILFORD
    @milforddaily Facebook.com/MilfordDailyNews $2
    milforddailynews.com
    Thursday, May 2, 2019
    By Eric Tucker
    and Mary Clare Jalonick
    The Associated Press
    WASHINGTON — Attorney
    General William Barr pushed
    back Wednesday at complaints
    from Robert Mueller over his
    handling of the Russia investi-
    gation report, leveling his own
    criticism at the special counsel as
    simmering tensions between the
    Justice Department and Muel-
    ler’s team broke into public view
    in extraordinary fashion.
    Testifying for the first time
    since releasing Mueller’s report,
    Barr said he was surprised Muel-
    ler did not reach a conclusion on
    whether President Donald Trump
    had tried to obstruct justice, and
    that he felt compelled to step
    in with his own judgment that
    the president had committed
    no crime. Barr also complained
    that Mueller’s report did not, as
    requested, clearly flag sensitive
    material, creating weeks of work
    for the Justice Department as it
    moved to redact grand jury mate-
    rial that was not intended for the
    public.
    “I’m not really sure of his rea-
    soning,” Barr said of Mueller’s
    decision to not reach a conclusion
    on obstruction of justice. He sug-
    gested that Mueller “shouldn’t
    have investigated” acts on which
    he did not plan to reach a pros-
    ecution judgment.
    Barr’s public defense of his
    actions rebutted complaints by
    Mueller, expressed in a letter and
    phone call, that the attorney gen-
    eral had not adequately portrayed
    the investigation’s findings. The
    revelation of that letter hours
    earlier amplified allegations from
    Democrats that Barr had spun
    the investigation’s findings in
    Trump’s favor.
    Democrats were also likely to
    accuse him of misleading law-
    makers last month when he
    suggested he was unaware of
    concerns on the Mueller team
    about his actions.
    Barr’s appearance Wednesday
    before the Senate Judiciary Com-
    mittee gave the attorney general
    his most extensive opportunity to
    explain the department’s actions,
    including his press conference
    held before the report’s release,
    and for him to repair a reputa-
    tion bruised by allegations that
    he’s the Republican president’s
    Barr, Mueller
    trade barbs
    as probe rift
    goes public
    By Brian Lee
    Telegram & Gazette Staff
    WESTBOROUGH — As cus-
    tomers pulled in to Alltown Mobil
    on Rte. 9 Tuesday, they were
    told that they could enroll in a
    first-in-the-nation option that
    would allow them to pay for fuel
    through their E-ZPass vehicle
    transponders, according to two
    people responsible for the new
    technology. They said the pay-
    ment method eliminates eight of
    the 12 steps at the pump, shav-
    ing 80 seconds from the average
    four-minute transaction.
    "It's not an insignificant
    amount of time," said Kevin
    Condon, founder and chief exec-
    utive officer of Boston-based
    PayByCar.
    The in-car payment technology
    system became available to
    the general public on Monday,
    Condon said.
    Anyone who has an E-ZPass
    toll transponder was invited to
    register for PayByCar through
    a two-step process at www.
    mypaybycar.com. Enrollment
    requires entering the E-ZPass
    transponder number and a credit
    card or other form of payment.
    The PayByCar account is separate
    from customers' toll accounts.
    Condon and PayByCar Presi-
    dent Anand Raman stood in front
    of the 10-pump gas station at
    Rte. 9 and Lyman Street handing
    people cards about the program,
    and answering questions.
    Condon estimated about 100
    people registered Monday.
    Antennas on the gas-station
    canopy read the transponders,
    and when an enrolled customer
    pulls in, he or she will receive a
    text message asking if they want
    gas, and if so, at which pump.
    By the time the customer gets
    out of the car, the pump has been
    activated, Condon said.
    "I don’t have to swipe a card or
    worry about someone looking at
    the PIN number, or skimming,"
    the founder said.
    The customer takes the dis-
    penser nozzle, makes a fuel
    choice, fills up, returns the nozzle
    and the transaction is done. The
    customer gets a receipt, and the
    transaction is recorded via email
    and on the PayByCar account
    page.
    "It’s really seamless," Condon
    said.
    E-ZGas PayByCar uses
    transponders to
    shave time at pump
    From left, PayByCar President Anand Raman and PayByCar founder and CEO Kevin Condon. Their system of paying
    for gas via a car’s toll transponder is in use at the Alltown Mobil station on Rte. 9 in Westborough. [T&G STAFF/RICK
    CINCLAIR]
    By Alison Bosma
    Daily News Staff
    MILFORD – Peter Garrett
    noticed a substantial spike in
    the number of customers when
    his gas station opened Milford’s
    first self-serve pumps off Rte. 85
    earlier this year.
    “I think there’s been a lot of
    pent-up demand in Milford,”
    said Garrett, president of Volta
    Oil, which owns Garrett’s
    Family Market. “There are a
    lot of people who have wanted
    self-serve gasoline.”
    Prior to last October’s Town
    Meeting vote changing the
    bylaw, Milford allowed only
    full-serve gas stations, mean-
    ing customers could not pump
    their own gas. The Town Meet-
    ing article behind the vote was
    sponsored by Volta Oil, and
    Garrett’s Family Market is the
    only gas station in town that
    offers self-serve.
    This weekend, nearly four
    months after their mid-Janu-
    ary opening and less than two
    months after converting all
    Milford self-serve pumps open for business
    Garrett’s Family Market
    hosting party Saturday
    By Cesareo Contreras
    Daily News Staff
    ASHLAND – He went for fun,
    and almost beat a juggernaut.
    Local residents got to see a
    familiar face on “Jeopardy!”
    Monday night, as Adam Levin,
    of Ashland, took on the longtime
    trivia show's reigning, and seem-
    ingly unbeatable, champ, James
    Holzhauer - and very nearly
    defeated him.
    Levin, the sports information
    director at Brandeis Univer-
    sity in Waltham, finished with
    $53,999, just $18 short of Hol-
    zhauer's $54,017. Holzhauer,
    a professional sports bettor,
    earned his 18th consecutive vic-
    tory on Monday, accumulating
    more than $1.3 million.
    “I put everything out there and
    did everything I felt I could possi-
    bly do,” Levin said. “As someone
    who works with student-athletes
    and works at sporting events at
    Brandeis, I see it all the time,
    where great teams and great ath-
    letes and people who go out there
    and give it their all, don’t always
    win every game. As long as they
    gave it their hardest and left it all
    out on the field, they have every-
    thing in the world to be proud of.”
    Levin, a Brandeis graduate, has
    applied for the show sporadically
    over the past decade, starting
    around the time the game show
    started letting people take the
    submission tests online, he said.
    He’s loved the show since he was
    a kid.
    While he’s successfully passed
    Ashland resident proves he’s a gamer
    Adam Levin narrowly
    misses knocking off
    ‘Jeopardy!’ champ
    See JEOPARDY, A4
    See GAS, A4
    See PUMPS, A4 See BARR, A4

    View full-size slide

  30. America’s Page One
    WEATHER
    High 84, Low 58
    AccuWeather report, C8
    Friday 79 | 61
    Saturday 77 | 58
    Sunday 65 | 51
    Monday 74 | 54
    Business .
    . A9
    Comics .
    . B10
    Horoscope B7
    Lotteries .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    . D8
    Marketplace A12
    Movies .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    .
    . B4
    Obituaries .
    . B8
    Opinion .
    . A14
    Television B11
    To advertise, call
    1-800-341-3413. For a
    complete list of numbers,
    see “Contact Us” on A4.
    By Susan Snyder and Erin Arvedlund
    STAFF WRITERS
    When Temple University asked for
    his resignation, Moshe Porat refused
    to give it. Now, the ousted business
    school dean is fighting back.
    Porat, 72, alleges that the universi-
    ty has unfairly blamed him for a rank-
    ings scandal that
    rocked the Fox
    School of Business
    last summer, and
    ruined his reputa-
    tion and legacy.
    He claims that
    for years, he sent
    written directives
    to other Fox staff,
    warning them to
    make sure all the
    data for the rank-
    ings were honest
    and accurate —
    and was assured
    that they were —
    and that, in the
    end, Temple made him a scapegoat
    to protect its own image.
    He asserts that he did not know
    about or authorize the false reporting
    of data or falsify any data provided to
    U.S. News & World Report and other
    rankings organizations. Nor, he main-
    tained, did he dismantle a committee
    charged with oversight of the data,
    as the school contended.
    “Out of loyalty to the university, I
    have been publicly silent for 10 long
    months,” Porat said in a nearly 1,400
    word statement provided to The In-
    See TEMPLE on A6
    Ousted
    dean at
    Temple to
    retaliate
    Moshe Porat plans to sue the
    university, saying he was
    unfairly blamed for false
    data submitted to U.S. News.
    Attorney General William Barr responded to Democratic senators’ tough questioning with calm, citing legal definitions and Justice
    Department policy. One frustrated Democrat, Rhode Island’s Sheldon Whitehouse, accused him of “masterful hairsplitting.”
    Senate Sparring
    The attorney general deflected criticism and calls for his
    resignation. He described Mueller’s letter as “a bit snitty.”
    THIS IS FOR THE COPY-
    RIGHT, YEAR AND VOLUME.
    REGATTAS | B1
    Schools, city pony up
    to dredge Schuylkill
    SANDUSKY CASE | B1
    Shapiro vows appeal
    of Spanier ruling
    SPECIAL SECTION
    IN TODAY’S INQUIRER
    By Devlin Barrett, Matt Zapotosky,
    Karoun Demirjian, and Rosalind S. Helderman
    WASHINGTON POST
    WASHINGTON — Attorney General Wil-
    liam Barr denied Democrats’ accusa-
    tions that he dissembled and misled
    the public about Robert Mueller’s find-
    ings, defending his handling of the
    case during a contentious Senate hearing Wednes-
    day about the special counsel Russia investigation.
    Much of the hearing centered on revelations that
    Mueller com-
    plained more than
    a month ago about
    Barr’s initial public
    depiction of the in-
    vestigation’s find-
    ings. The attorney
    general parried
    many of the Demo-
    crats’ toughest ac-
    cusations and ques-
    tions with avuncu-
    lar answers about
    legal definitions
    and Justice Department policy, exasperating law-
    makers such as Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D., R.I.),
    who accused Barr of “masterful hairsplitting.”
    Mueller wrote a letter in late March expressing
    dissatisfaction to Barr that the attorney general’s
    four-page memo to Congress, which described the
    principal conclusions of Mueller’s investigation
    See BARR on A6
    Is development rising above the dead?
    The massive Schuylkill Yards may cover two large,
    abandoned cemeteries established by early Quakers.
    Assistant District Attorney
    Colleen Osborne had made
    a list of all the people who
    had failed Ethan Okula.
    It’s a long list. The 10-year-old
    foster child, a ward of our city,
    died a wholly preventable death
    in 2016:
    The city Department of Hu-
    man Services let Ethan — who
    had developmental disabilities,
    hearing problems, and a debili-
    tating stomach condition — fall
    through the cracks.
    The agencies contracting with
    DHS falsified a record and mis-
    handled his medical care.
    The nurse at Julia de Burgos
    Elementary School failed to real-
    ize that Ethan’s stomach condi-
    tion had put him in mortal peril
    on the day he writhed in pain in
    See ETHAN on A6
    Guilty pleas, but many more to blame
    ANDREW HARNIK / AP J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE / AP J. SCOTT APPLEWHITE / AP
    Moshe Porat
    was removed as
    head of Fox
    business school.
    SIXERS-RAPTORS PREVIEW | SPORTS, C1
    EMBIID: I WON’T
    FORCE MY GAME
    PHILLIES 7, TIGERS 3 | SPORTS, C1
    FRANCO’S DOUBLE
    CLEARS THE BASES
    THE MUELLER REPORT | BARR TESTIFIES
    “My understanding
    was, his concern
    was not the accuracy of
    the statement of the
    findings in my letter, but
    that he wanted more out
    there to provide
    additional context.
    William Barr’s interpretation of
    a letter from Robert Mueller
    By Stephan Salisbury
    STAFF WRITER
    The massive $3.5 billion
    Schuylkill Yards development
    that begins at 30th Street Station
    and extends west along Market
    Street and JFK Boulevard to 31st
    Street is taking shape in part on
    land that was once occupied —
    and may still be — by two of the
    city’s oldest and largest aban-
    doned historic cemeteries.
    Both burial grounds — known
    as the Upper Burial Ground and
    the Lower Burial Ground —
    were started by the Quakers in
    the 17th century, and were in use
    from the 1680s until the middle
    of the 19th century.
    Here lay the Quaker dead —
    and a huge proportion of the non-
    Quaker poor, African Americans,
    laboring classes, immigrants,
    transients, and others relegated
    to what became burial fields for
    the indigent.
    No records of wholesale remov-
    als or reinterments of skeletal re-
    mains from either cemetery have
    been found in public records. And
    skulls and bones have been repeat-
    edly unearthed during construc-
    tion in the neighborhood over the
    last century or so, according to
    newspaper accounts.
    In one instance, as 30th Street
    See DEVELOPMENT on A4
    BURIAL FIELDS FOR THE INDIGENT
    A SYSTEM ON TRIAL
    MIKENEWALL
    "@MikeNewall
    RATINGS SCANDAL
    In a March 27 letter,
    Robert Mueller took
    issue with William
    Barr’s summarization
    of his Russia report.
    Sen. Kamala Harris (D.,
    Calif.) addresses Barr.
    He later canceled a
    scheduled appearance
    Thursday in the House.
    KEN CEDENO / Sipa USA / TNS
    The Schuylkill
    Yards project
    extends west of
    30th Street
    Station. Burial
    grounds’ exact
    location is
    uncertain.
    TOM GRALISH / Staff
    Photographer
    Ethan Okula was 10 when
    he died of a stomach
    ailment. On Wednesday,
    his foster mother and her
    wife were sentenced.
    THURSDAY MAY 2, 2019 | :"PHILLYINQUIRER | CITY & SUBURBS | C | $2.95 NEWS AROUND THE CLOCK
    © 2019 Philadelphia Media Network | 190th Year, No. 336
    Home Delivery: 215-665-1234 or 1-800-222-2765
    Single-copy price may be higher in outlying areas

    View full-size slide

  31. America’s Page One
    www.scnow.com TheVoice of the Pee Dee $1.50
    INDEX
    Vol. 96, No. 122;
    Florence, S.C.
    BUSINESS, 8B
    COMICS, 4B
    CROSSWORD, 6B
    HOROSCOPE, 6A
    OBITUARIES, 5A
    OPINION, 7A
    STATE, 2A
    SPORTS, 1B
    THE BEST
    CLASSIFIEDS
    IN THE PEE DEE
    PAGE 5B. CALL 317-SELL
    TheVoice of the Pee Dee
    SPORTS South Florence captures District VI championship. Page 1B
    THURSDAY MAY 2, 2019
    Become a fan
    of the Morning News!
    www.facebook/morningnews
    SEND US YOUR NEWS TO [email protected] FOR HOME DELIVERY, CALL 843-317-6397
    TODAY’S
    WEATHER
    High 87, low 65.
    Chance of rain:
    10 percent.
    FRI: 81/66, 80%
    BY MATTHEW CHRISTIAN
    Morning News
    mchristian@florencenews.com
    FLORENCE — Fiesta fun
    will return Friday evening
    to downtown Florence in
    celebration of Cinco de
    Mayo.
    The fifth annual Down-
    town Cinco de Mayo Fiesta
    will be held from 5:30 p.m.
    to 10 p.m. in the 100 block
    of South Dargan Street.
    The 100 block is between
    Cheves and Evans streets.
    Admission is free, but
    proceeds from ticket sales
    for food and drinks will go
    toward the Greater Flor-
    ence Habitat for Humanity.
    Debbie Edwards, execu-
    tive director of the Greater
    Florence Habitat for Hu-
    manity, said Tuesday that
    the proceeds from the fi-
    esta will go to the construc-
    tion of a house on West
    Vista Street by the Great-
    er Florence Habitat for
    Humanity.
    Fiesta fun
    downtown
    will benefit
    Habitat for
    Humanity
    Cinco
    de Mayo
    BY REBECCA CROSS
    Special to the Morning News
    LAKE CITY — Words of truth
    create meaning and movement,
    said artist Tom Owen.
    Owen encourages all people to
    leverage this power of truth and
    “Raise Your Voice” – the phrase
    doubling as his charge to hu-
    manity and title of his 2019 Art-
    Fields piece.
    “This work continues my ex-
    ploration of using color and
    Tom Owen
    Artist spotlight
    CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
    BYARDIE ARVIDSON
    Morning News
    Aarvidsonflorencenews.com
    LAKE CITY – Coinciding with
    the nine-day ArtFields in
    Lake City this week is
    the opening of the
    private Moore Farms
    Botanical Garden to
    the public. It is open
    daily, from 8:30 a.m.
    to 3 p.m. through Sat-
    urday and features art
    installations purchased from
    previous ArtFields.
    Rebecca Turk, director of edu-
    cation and event at the garden,
    said the garden tries to acquire
    at least one piece of artwork from
    the ArtFields exhibit each year
    to display. Art and nature lovers
    attending ArtFields are encour-
    aged to visit the garden. The
    address is 100 New Zion
    Road in Lake City.
    Turk said the self-
    guided tours can take
    as little as 40 minutes
    or as long as a couple
    of hours. Guided tours
    are about an hour and a
    half, she said, and must be
    booked in advance.
    Botanical Garden open during annual event
    ARDIE ARVIDSON/MORNING NEWS
    Moore Farms Botanical Garden in Lake City features 65 cultivated acres
    of land and is open to the public during ArtFields.
    ABOUTTHIS ARTIST
    » From: Newport,
    Kentucky.
    » Age: 59.
    » 2019 ArtFields
    competition
    title: “Raise Your
    Voice.”
    » Medium: Wa-
    terborne enamel,
    acrylic and latex paint, crayon,
    wax pastels on stretched canvas.
    » Venue: So-Lace Boutique.
    » Voting ID: 192144.
    Owen
    “Raise Your
    Voice”is artist
    Tom Owen’s
    encouragement
    to all people
    “to speak truth,
    to bring light.”
    See OWEN, Page 3A
    Art from previous years on display
    See FIESTA, Page 3A
    See ARTFIELDS, Page 3A
    BY MATTHEW CHRISTIAN
    Morning News
    mchristian@florencenews.com
    FLORENCE — Tuition
    will be going up for those
    attending Florence-Dar-
    lington Technical College.
    On Monday, the Flor-
    ence-Darlington County
    Commission for Technical
    Education, the governing
    body for the college, ap-
    proved a 3.3 percent tu-
    ition increase, equivalent
    to an additional $6 per
    credit hour.
    The per-credit hour rate
    will go from $179 to $185.
    Interim President Ed
    Bethea said the board
    looked at the college’s
    budget and decided the
    tuition increase was neces-
    sary to balance the budget.
    He said enrollment was
    declining at the college.
    Bethea said the increase
    would result in roughly
    $500,000 in additional
    revenue.
    “I think that the entire
    Florence-
    Darlington Tech
    Tuition
    rising
    3.3% at
    college
    See TUITION, Page 5A
    BY LAUREN OWENS
    Morning News
    lowens@florencenews.com
    COLUMBIA – Among the nearly
    10,000 teachers and supporters
    protesting Wednesday morn-
    ing at the South Carolina State
    House, nearly 300 Florence One
    Schools teachers came dressed in
    red to protest low pay and poor
    working conditions.
    The rally, organized by the SC
    for Ed teacher advocacy group,
    began at the South Carolina De-
    partment of Education building.
    The participants marched to the
    capitol, chanting phrases such
    as “Where’s Molly?” and “I teach.
    I vote.” State Superientendent of
    Education Molly Spearman did
    not attend the rally, choosing
    instead to serve as a substitute
    teacher.
    Robin Bowman, a Briggs El-
    ementary School teacher and Pee
    Dee area representative for SC for
    Ed, said the turnout for the rally
    Florence teachers join big rally
    ‘A seat at the table’
    LAUREN OWENS/MORNING NEWS
    S.C. Sen. Mike Fanning of Great Falls hypes up the crowd of nearly 10,000 people during the SC for Ed rally Wednesday.
    See RALLY, Page 4A
    LOCAL
    Area shops
    to participate
    in Free Comic
    Book Day.
    Page 2A

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  32. America’s Page One

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  33. America’s Page One
    THE PARAMOUNT CHAMBER PLAYERS PRESENTS
    Masterworks y
    Chamber Music
    MAY 04 @ 7:3O PM
    COMING ATTRACTIONS AND TICKETS ONLINE @ PARAMOUNTBRISTOL.ORG OR CALL 423-274-8920
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    TRUTH. ACCURACY. FAIRNESS.
    Southwest Virginia-Northeast Tennessee The Birthplace of Country Music ® 2010 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service
    INDEX
    Thank you,
    Mack E.
    Harless,
    for subscribing
    to the Bristol
    Herald Courier.
    CLASSIFIEDS ...............B10-B12
    COMICS.................................B8
    DEATHS........................... A2-A4
    OPINION.............................. A10
    TELEVISION..........................B9
    162
    26,430.14
    MARKET
    SUMMARY
    » B6
    REGION
    Restoring renovation fund
    for Sullivan school system
    would mean tax hike » A5
    D
    O
    W
    See BALLAD, Page A9
    See BARR, Page A2
    A&E » A6
    ATTEMPTED TRAFFIC STOP
    Weather » A12
    80/57
    State
    OKs
    Ballad
    NICU
    plan
    Barr,
    Mueller
    trade
    barbs
    Attorney general
    to skip House
    panel’s hearing
    BY DAVID MCGEE
    BRISTOLHERALD COURIER
    The Tennessee Depart-
    ment of Health has ap-
    proved a controversial Bal-
    lad Health plan to consoli-
    date its perinatal services.
    On Wednesday, state
    Health Commissioner Lisa
    Piercey issued her decision,
    approving Ballad’s request
    to consolidate neonatal
    intensive care services in
    Johnson City. She said three
    of her children were treated
    in NICUs, and she under-
    stands the gravity of the
    plan.
    “As a parent, I also know
    firsthand the stressors of
    having a baby in the NICU.
    Three of my four children
    were NICU babies who ex-
    perienced prolonged stays
    due to prematurity, so I
    personally understand the
    significance of this deci-
    sion,” Piercey said in the
    statement.
    Ballad will maintain its
    LevelIIINICUatNiswonger
    Children’s Hospital in John-
    son City while downgrad-
    ing the NICU at Holston
    Valley Medical Center in
    Kingsport from Level III to
    Level I. The plan was met
    with considerable public
    opposition, especially from
    people and elected officials
    in the Holston Valley ser-
    vice area, when it was an-
    nounced last November.
    “In objectively weighing
    the pros and the cons of
    consolidating NICU ser-
    vices, it is my opinion that
    the benefits of doing so
    significantly outweigh the
    detriments,” Piercey said
    in the statement. “Guided
    by the well-established
    standards of regionalized
    perinatal care, I find the
    most notable benefit of
    the consolidation to be the
    enhancement in quality of
    care and patient outcomes,
    secondary to higher patient
    volumes, sufficient physi-
    cian coverage and timely
    specialist access.”
    DAVID CRIGGER/BRISTOL HERALD COURIER
    Multiple law enforcement agencies assisted the Scott County Sheriff’s Office on Wednesday as they conducted a
    manhunt for a suspect who shot at officers during an attempted traffic stop.The incident happened on Roberts
    Creek Road near Hiltons,Virginia.The subject of the manhunt,Timothy Manuel, was later shot and killed.
    DAVID CRIGGER/BRISTOL HERALD COURIER
    A Virginia State Police helicopter and an armored vehicle were among the units that responded Wednesday.
    DAVID CRIGGER/BHC
    Scott County Sheriff Chris
    Holder gives an update.
    Suspect killed
    Bristol man fatally shot after multi-agency manhunt
    BY DALENA MATHEWS and ROBERT SORRELL
    BRISTOL HERALD COURIER
    HILTONS,Va. — An attempted
    traffic stop in Scott County,
    Virginia, on Wednesday
    morning set off a multi-agency
    manhunt in Hiltons that resulted
    in the fatal shooting of a Bristol
    man.
    Scott County Sheriff Chris Hold-
    er said a deputy was traveling
    along Roberts Creek Road when
    he tried to stop a car with out-
    of-state tags that was swerving.
    When the car stopped, the driver
    jumped out and
    began shooting at
    the officer with a
    rifle before fleeing
    into the nearby
    woods, he said.
    The deputy, who
    was not identified,
    was shaken up but
    not injured, the sheriff said.
    The driver, Timothy Manuel, 28,
    of Bristol,Virginia, was believed
    to still be armed and dangerous
    Manuel
    See MANHUNT, Page A9
    BY ERIC TUCKER
    and MARY CLARE JALONICK
    TheAssociated Press
    WASHINGTON — Pri-
    vate tensions between Jus-
    tice Department leaders
    and special counsel Robert
    Mueller’s team broke into
    public view in extraordi-
    nary fashion Wednesday as
    Attorney General William
    Barr pushed back at the
    special counsel’s “snitty”
    complaints over his han-
    dling of the Trump-Russia
    investigation report.
    Testifying for the first time
    since releasing Mueller’s
    report, Barr faced sharp
    questioning from Senate
    Democrats who accused
    him of making misleading
    comments and seeming at
    times to be President Don-
    ald Trump’s protector as
    much as the country’s top
    law enforcement official.
    The rift fueled allegations
    that Barr has spun Mueller’s
    findings in Trump’s favor
    and understated the grav-
    ity of Trump’s behavior. The
    dispute is certain to persist,
    as Democrats push to give
    Mueller a chance to answer
    Barr’s testimony with his
    own later this month.
    Barr separately informed
    the House Judiciary Com-
    mittee that he would not
    appear for its scheduled
    hearing Thursday because
    ofthepanel’sinsistencethat
    he be questioned by com-
    mittee lawyers as well as
    lawmakers.That refusal sets
    thestageforBarrtopossibly
    beheldincontemptofCon-
    gress.
    AtWednesday’s Senate Ju-
    diciary Committee session,
    Barr spent hours defending
    his handling of Mueller’s
    report against complaints
    from Democrats and the
    special counsel himself.
    He said, for instance, that
    he had been surprised
    that Mueller did not reach
    a conclusion on whether
    Trump had tried to obstruct
    justice, and that he had felt
    BRISTOL HERALD COURIER
    WOMEN’S
    COACH OF
    THE YEAR
    » B1
    Take advantage of
    Breaks Interstate
    Park’s Elk Tours

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  34. America’s Page One

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  35. America’s Page One
    SHEBOYGAN - Fishing season is upon us, but before you get out
    your pole and head to the water, you’ll need a license.
    The fine for fishing without a license last year was $222.90,
    so you’ll want to make sure you have one before casting a line.
    “These fees directly impact the quality of fisheries in Wisconsin by
    funding habitat work and stocking efforts throughout the state,” Antho-
    ny Arndt, a conservation warden for the Wisconsin Department of Nat-
    ural Resources, said of the fees associated with getting a license.
    Hook, line
    and sinker
    Ready to go fishing? Here’s what you
    need to know to get your license
    Diana Dombrowski Sheboygan Press
    USA TODAY NETWORK - WISCONSIN
    Land fishermen fish off the north pier in 2017 in Sheboygan. GARY C. KLEIN/USA TODAY NETWORK-WISCONSIN
    See FISHING, Page 3A
    THURSDAY, MAY 2, 2019 ❚ SHEBOYGANPRESS.COM PART OF THE USA TODAY NETWORK
    Volume 113 | No. 137
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    Weather
    High 48° ❚ Low 38°
    Rain. Forecast, 7A
    Packers Hall of Fame will induct former GM Ted Thompson Saturday
    Mike Reinfeldt, a former Green Bay Packers executive, will introduce him. They both
    worked for the Packers in the 1990s. 2A
    XEAJAB-51950x
    MANITOWOC - Two-year-old Gilbert
    A. Grant II was repeatedly beaten and
    abused by his mother and her two room-
    mates in the months prior to his April 26
    death inside a Two Rivers apartment,
    court documents show.
    Grant turned 2 just days prior to his
    death, on April 21 — the same birth date
    of his mother, Rena L. Santiago, 27.
    Probable cause statements for the ar-
    rests of the suspects after his death —
    his mother and her roommates, Bianca
    M. Bush, 25, and David R. Heiden, 28 —
    show the boy was repeatedly beaten by
    the three with open hands, a shoe, a belt
    and a sandal, and had things thrown at
    him by his mother on several occasions.
    The documents also state Grant had
    food shoved down his throat and was
    forced to eat his own vomit by Bush af-
    ter she shoved her fingers in his throat.
    In the week prior to Grant’s death, Hei-
    den said he saw Bush slap Grant in the
    face with an open hand, ground him to
    the couch all day and night, throw
    things at Grant’s face, head and chest,
    and grab Grant by the sides and shake
    him while yelling “What are you doing?”
    He said she “would go to town” hitting
    him.
    Santiago, according to the court doc-
    uments, told police she witnessed all of
    the physical discipline and approved it.
    She also said she was aware of bruises
    on Grant’s body and avoided taking him
    to the doctor for regular check-ups as a
    result.
    On April 26, the day Grant died, Hei-
    den said he spanked Grant on the but-
    tocks with an open hand approximately
    three times, then picked Grant up by his
    Boy, 2, was repeatedly abused prior to death, court documents show
    Brandon Reid
    Manitowoc Herald Times Reporter
    USA TODAY NETWORK - WISCONSIN
    See ABUSE, Page 5A
    Bush Heiden Santiago
    Mother, roommates would hit child, throw things
    MILWAUKEE - As the most severe
    wave of measles in 19 years spreads
    across the country, state representa-
    tives are trying, for the second time, to
    eliminate Wisconsin’s “personal con-
    viction” vaccines waiver.
    Rep. Gordon Hintz, D-Oshkosh, rein-
    troduced the bill to do so Tuesday, three
    years after his first at-
    tempt failed to make it
    out of committee.
    As of yesterday, the
    U.S. Centers for Disease
    Control and Prevention
    reported confirmed mea-
    sles cases in 22 states,
    the highest number since the disease
    was eliminated from the country in
    2000.
    Elimination of endemic measles does
    not mean the disease no longer exists, it
    means the disease is no longer native to
    the U.S. Measles cases can still exist in
    the U.S. due to travelers bringing it here
    and then spreading it to people who are
    not vaccinated.
    Wisconsin is one of 18 states that al-
    lows parents to opt-out of the vaccines
    recommended for children before the
    start of school. Only three states — Mis-
    sissippi, West Virginia and California —
    don’t allow any nonmedical waivers, ac-
    cording to the National Conference of
    State Legislatures.
    Wisconsin has a 5.3 percent exemp-
    tion rate. Only four states — Arizona,
    Alaska, Idaho and Oregon — had higher
    rates of students who did not get the
    measles, mumps, rubella vaccine for a
    Amid measles scare, lawmakers trying to stop vaccine waivers
    Devi Shastri Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    USA TODAY NETWORK - WISCONSIN
    Hintz
    See VACCINES, Page 5A
    Chacín, Aguilar heading in
    right direction as Brewers
    close out arduous April
    SPORTS, 6A

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  36. Next
    9 Welcome and introduction
    9:15 The American reader and the newspaper
    9:45 History and anatomy of page one
    10:20 BREAK
    10:30 Language of design
    11 Modular design and designing modules
    Noon LUNCH
    12:45 America’s page one – PART ONE
    1:45 America’s page one – PART TWO
    2:45 BREAK
    3 Putting it all together
    3:55 Wrapping it all up
    4 Conclusion

    View full-size slide