Programming Gloves and Debugging the Brooklyn Bridge

Programming Gloves and Debugging the Brooklyn Bridge

Lessons for academic researchers and developers learned by two ex-academics. Presented at SoundSoftware 2013 at Queen Mary, University of London.

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Becky Stewart

June 26, 2013
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Transcript

  1. 1.

    Programming Gloves and Debugging the Brooklyn Bridge Lessons Learned from

    Developing for Interactive Installations Becky Stewart becky@codasign.com becky@antialiaslabs.com Twitter: @theleadingzero
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    Get good at spotting the most common errors Practice at

    creating tests on someone else's code Challenge to think of solutions with a reduced set of resources Teach beginners
  5. 10.

    Document publicly Time up front saves time later Don't have

    to memorise the details Can come across own work on google searches
  6. 11.

    Expect last minute changes Code as if you know that

    you will be asked to change it at the last minute with little or no time to test Encourages modularised code Need confidence in code – needs to be tested! Have tests ready to run so you have some confidence that it will work out (and ways to quickly solve problems when it doesn't)
  7. 12.
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    Manage expectations Help non-experts understand the strengths and weaknesses of

    the software Both for end users and tech transfer offices Boundaries of problem, algorithm, implementation