China and its global economy

21c0a7a7034a6b11140bf7a44e162055?s=47 Tom Paulus
November 17, 2015

China and its global economy

21c0a7a7034a6b11140bf7a44e162055?s=128

Tom Paulus

November 17, 2015
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Transcript

  1. GLOBAL BUSINESS CHINA AND ITS GLOBAL ECONOMY

  2. READING REVIEW - WHAT YOU SHOULD ALREADY KNOW… CHALLENGES IN

    WESTERN-CHINESE BUSINESS RELATIONSHIPS: THE CHINESE PERSPECTIVE ▸ The ideals of sinocentrism, modesty, long-term orientation, guanxi, in/out group, and high-context culture ▸ The differences that do not coexist between China and Western culture, such as modesty and in/out group orientation. Practices coexist.
  3. READING REVIEW - WHAT YOU SHOULD ALREADY KNOW… PARADOXES OF

    CHINA’S ECONOMIC BOOM ▸ Discuss how that even though China was behind during the Industrial revolution, they caught up after the 1960’s and 1970’s with the open door policy that was instituted. ▸ China uses “step-by-step” economic changing instead of “big bang” economic changing. ▸ Japan fought Western influence and was more successful. ▸ Odd thing about China is that they are growing despite sanctions and financial crisis. Have recently passed up U.S. as the number one economy.
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  6. GUANXI THE ART OF DEALING WITH CHINESE BUSINESSMEN

  7. A CROSS CULTURAL MEETING CAN YOU CLOSE THE DEAL? (

    CLICK TO START TIMER )
  8. IT IS VERY DIFFICULT FOR WESTERN BUSINESSMEN TO ESTABLISH GUANXI,

    DUE TO PERCEIVED CULTURAL DIFFERENCES, AND DISTINCT BUSINESS PRACTICES. PROBLEM SOLVING
  9. PROBLEM SOLVING ADDRESSING AN ISSUE - A CLASS ON CHINESE

    BUSINESS INTERACTION ▸ Create a class here on SDSU campus that is designated to help International Business students learn how to facilitate a meeting like you just experienced, and plus other interactions and laws about conducting business in China. ▸ It would be a two part class. Where during the first part, students travel to China in the Summer, as a group with their Professor. With the goal of providing the students with an opportunity for full cultural immersion.
  10. PROBLEM SOLVING ADDRESSING AN ISSUE - A CLASS ON CHINESE

    BUSINESS INTERACTION ▸ The Second part of the course would involve guest speakers, workshops; immersive activities and assignments which allows students to showcase and apply what they learned during their trip to China. ▸ Chris’ dad has experience working in Asian countries for business and he could be of valuable assistance to the learning process. The class would work closely with the Aztec Mentorship Program, who could help the students in the class have access to mentors who have conducted business in China. ▸ A useful professor for this class would be SDSU’s very own Dr. Todd Myers, an Economics professor who also teaches an Asian State and Society course. He would be a great candidate because of his knowledge of the American markets and communication, and the Asian societies. ▸ There would be a sister program in China: at Yale University in Beijing, which could serve as a school to Study Abroad in.
  11. PROBLEM SOLVING ADDRESSING AN ISSUE - A CLASS ON CHINESE

    BUSINESS INTERACTION ▸ We would work closely with Dr. Sinclair and the other Honors College Faculty to develop the curriculum for the Course. We would also collaborate with faculty members from the College of Business, the International Student Center, and the aforementioned on-campus organizations. ▸ This course not only provides students with an High-Impact experience, but it also invokes global citizen ship, and fulfills the Honors Minor requirement to partake in a credit-bearing international experience. It also offers credit towards the Honors Minor.
  12. PROBLEM SOLVING ADDRESSING AN ISSUE - A CLASS ON CHINESE

    BUSINESS INTERACTION ▸ We will judge the success of our class based on whether or not students who have participated in the class are able to successfully bridge the gap between Chinese and Western global businesses by conducting a mock business deal between Chinese Exchange Students and American Exchange students. ▸ There is an immense amount of logistics that needs to be taken care of, as well as the monetary and cultural issues. Cross cultural communication may also lead to delays.
  13. LOOKING BACK WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED? ▸ We have a

    deeper understanding of the intercultural relationships ▸ We also have learned how to properly interface with Chinese and other Asian markets.